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  1. #381
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    Quote Originally Posted by hunter.pleasure View Post
    Thank you TKR!!!!
    Isn't it interesting that most of the pro-slaughter comments on this page are by apparent alcoholics? They're talking about early-morning drinking. Wassup?
    We thought drinking would deaden the impact of posts from anti slaughter groups who have no solutiond.


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  2. #382
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    Horsehair fabrics are woven with wefts of tail hair from live horses and cotton or silk warps. Horsehair fabrics are sought for their lustre, durability and care properties and mainly used for upholstery and interiors.[2]

    Horsehair is used for the crafts of horsehair hitching, horsehair braiding, pottery, and in making jewelry items such as bracelets, necklaces, earrings and barrettes.[3] It is used to make some wall and fine arts paintbrushes. Painting is one of the areas where horsehair is still widely used today. The horsehair is processed, cut to size and fitted to paint brushes that are used for anything from painting walls to painting pictures to be hung in galleries. Horsehair is desirable for paint brushes because of its smooth lay and ability to hold a large amount of paint acting as a reservoir and allowing the painter to stop less frequently.[4]

    Horsehair is used for violin and other stringed instrument bows. Another use in the art community comes from pottery and basket weaving where the hair is used for distinct accents and styling.[5]

    The use of horsehair for fishing has a wide range of applications. The most widely applied use for horsehair is in the fishing line. The hair is spun together and made into very long lines
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horsehair



  3. #383
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fairfax View Post
    Thank you for your subjective article.

    Horses are livestock. Your analysis of who sells and why is recycled pap circulated by Animal Rights

    The issue re slaughter house versus crime has already be explained and the original paper did not address the impact of English second language or no english at all coupled with ethnic isolation. While providing a financial living for the workers, the children are often isolated and turn to gangs.

    This is NOT because they work in slaughter. It is no different than any employment that has concerntrations of ethnic groups because whites from North America don't want to do THAT type of work

    Anti slaughter groups such as HSUS DO restrict the manner that horses can be killed. Their sponsored vets REFUSE to kill any healthy horse or old healthy horse just because the owner can no longer afford it.

    I would suggest you read more on the subject.
    Well El Paso is 75% Hispanic, and we are the safest city in the nation compared to other cities of our size...I'd say that is a large concentration of an ethnic group. Many do not speak English. Kind of disproves your theory. (Oh...and we also have a very low avg income, and high number of illegal aliens).


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  4. #384
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fairfax View Post
    We thought drinking would deaden the impact of posts from anti slaughter groups who have no solutiond.
    Nice try Leo. Oh, and nice typo as well...i guess it was the result of drinking? Misspellings are usually underlined with a red squigily line, how did you miss that?

    As for "no solutions", I find this comment completely unbelieveable.

    As I mentioned in an earlier post, solutions have been posted over and over again on many of the threads regarding this topic. You replied on an earlier post that you don't recall seeing ideas/solutions, yet you (and the other regulars on the anti-slaughter team) have put down most if not all of the solutions that have been mentioned.

    You all are so quick to take the easy way out. Why none of you ever think it's okay to explore alternatives first is beyond my comprehension.

    I've written it before and I'll write it again: slaughter is a cop out for people who don't feel the need to responsibly care for their horses or need a place to dump the young horses they bred and can't sell or the broodmares they no longer want to breed, the cow horses who have worked for years and are ready to retire, etc, etc.

    If you think the so called abundance of "unwanted horses" is a problem, I suggest you check out a group in the PNW who are part of a group called Auction Horses who are quite active on Facebook and have a good following on their forum. They find homes for numerous horses at the auctions in the Washington/Oregon area and are quite successful at doing it. It requires a passion and committment to the WELFARE of horses and sets an amazing example for others to follow.

    Again, all I ask is you and the other people congregating in Bluey's basement take the time to consider options, before choosing the easy route.
    Proud owner of a Slaughter-Bound TB from a feedlot, and her surprise baby...!
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  5. #385
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fairfax View Post
    Horsehair fabrics are woven with wefts of tail hair from live horses and cotton or silk warps. Horsehair fabrics are sought for their lustre, durability and care properties and mainly used for upholstery and interiors.[2]

    Horsehair is used for the crafts of horsehair hitching, horsehair braiding, pottery, and in making jewelry items such as bracelets, necklaces, earrings and barrettes.[3] It is used to make some wall and fine arts paintbrushes. Painting is one of the areas where horsehair is still widely used today. The horsehair is processed, cut to size and fitted to paint brushes that are used for anything from painting walls to painting pictures to be hung in galleries. Horsehair is desirable for paint brushes because of its smooth lay and ability to hold a large amount of paint acting as a reservoir and allowing the painter to stop less frequently.[4]

    Horsehair is used for violin and other stringed instrument bows. Another use in the art community comes from pottery and basket weaving where the hair is used for distinct accents and styling.[5]

    The use of horsehair for fishing has a wide range of applications. The most widely applied use for horsehair is in the fishing line. The hair is spun together and made into very long lines
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horsehair
    And 800000 horses die by other than slaughter each year, and horsehair is an item that RENDERERS can use/obtain easily without killing perfectly healthy horses for their meat.


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  6. #386
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    Quote Originally Posted by jetsmom View Post
    And 800000 horses die by other than slaughter each year, and horsehair is an item that RENDERERS can use/obtain easily without killing perfectly healthy horses for their meat.
    Are you serious?
    All those pages and you have not realized yet that slaughter is where SOME horses are used one more time, as the natural, renewable resource SOME horses can be for us thru slaughter, horses that are going to be DEAD anyway, the solutions those for banning slaughter give for those SOME horses is to have animal control kill them and send them to the landfill?

    In what crazy world does that make any sense, to have an asset those horses are thru slaughter and now ban that process to waste it all on a whim of some animal rights extremists and their followers?



  7. #387
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    Quote Originally Posted by andylover View Post
    If the horse owners is not responsible then it becomes the burden of the tax payers.. too much history to not refute that.. there is a surplus of horses, always has been.. the public when wanting to go buy a horse want plenty of supply in which to look at and will complain when there isnt enough horses in which to view. plus with less horses, those that are on the market for sale for personal use and not for food the price will see no end. the horse truly may again become only for the well to do.. ok, so again there is a surplus, but I dont think turning us more into human guinea pigs to determine if down the road 20 some odd years that all of a sudden "oops yep bute, banamine etc causes cancer" and let those survivors sue "us" is the route to go.. we have all heard those stories where in big corporations is actually cheaper to pay off the lawsuit claims then to stop production etc.

    Fairfax, taxes are paid to support the U.S., including the farmer, rancher, as well as the horse industry. As a horse owner, I support tractor, truck, and trailer companies which in turn pay their share of taxes from my business. I support local business by paying top dollar for tires, oil changes, etc. I pay more into the insurance company as well as higher license plate fees - all because I own horses. I support local ranchers with the purchase of hay, I support local horticulture centers by providing manure.. I support my vets.. All of these companies pay employees and employees pay taxes plus the business itself pays income taxes. so if the tax payer is complaining because of their perceived rise in taxes, then if the horse industry went away completely - how much do you think that would affect the economy in general?
    If this has been broached before in this posting, I didnt mean to duplicate.. may have missed the posting
    Live horses generate far more money that impacts our domestic economy than slaughter [that takes the profit overseas-plants are foreign owned and were notorious for paying very little in taxes] ever could.

    Considering that the average horse at slaughter is 7, in good weight, not lame and sane... those horses offer far more financially [in so many ways] as riding horses, sport horses, or pets than they do as meat.
    Particularly when you consider that the #1 buyer of meat, the EU, wants clean meat without specific banned drugs, as verified by a passport [starting in July]. Once this passport requirement is in place those 100,000 US horses who do not have passports will not have a slaughter value.

    Just a few of the numerous studies available on the Google re: the economic impact of horses

    In CO:

    Horse industry study, by the numbers:
    • Douglas/Elbert horse industry spending: $100 million to $135 million
    • Colorado Horse Park generates $15 million annually in spending
    • Industry supports 1,400-1,950 direct and indirect jobs in Douglas and Elbert
    • Douglas County’s horse population ranks 40th in the nation
    • 66 percent of survey respondents make more than $250K per year




    http://www.ourcoloradonews.com/castl...9bb2963f4.html


    TX in ‘98


    Developed by
    Department of Department of Department of
    Animal Science Large Animal Medicine & Surgery Agricultural Economics


    Horseowners have $13 billion invested in barns, towing vehicles, trailers, tack and
    related equipment and spend $2.1 billion annually just to maintain their horses.

    ! In showing and racing alone, almost 300,000 owners, family members & volunteers
    spend $3 billion per year attending competitive events with over 250,000 horses.

    ! Texas horses are valued at $4.2 billion.

    ! Annual cash receipts for horses bought/sold exceeds $354 million. Horse receipts are
    over 2 times greater than the combined total for hogs, sheep and lambs, and are 1.1
    times the total receipts for Texas wheat.

    ! Total impact of the horse industry to Texas economy exceeds $11 billion annually.



    http://animalscience.tamu.edu/files/...industry10.pdf


    Va

    • The Virginia horse industry has an economic impact of $1.2 billion.

    • The industry generated more than 16,000 jobs in 2010 in Virginia with the greatest effects in the agriculture and ag services sectors, and a lesser effect in the areas of trade and construction.

    • The largest areas of economic impact continue to be in Northern Virginia. More than 1,600 jobs in Fauquier and Loudoun are horse related. However, the largest employment impact in the state is in Rockbridge Country—the location of the Virginia Horse Center in Lexington. More than 1,330 jobs are industry related in Lexington and Buena Vista.

    • The horse industry in Virginia generates $65.3 million in state and local taxes. More than 50% of that figure represents state taxes.

    • Horse owners spend $873 million annually on horse-related expenses—including feed and bedding(the largest area of expense), boarding, training, tack, capital improvements, and labor. These expenses average out to $4,060 per horse.

    • Nearly 1,200 horse shows and events were held in Virginia in 2010 - generating $25 million in revenue. Some 939,000 people attended Virginia horse shows and competitions last year. Out of state participants spent an average of $3,100 per event per “travel party.”

    • Horses are the 9th largest agricultural commodity in Virginia according to cash receipts and Virginia ranks 12th in the nation for numbers of horses. According to the Census of Ag Statistics, while the number of farms in Virginia decreased between 1997-2007, the number of farms with horses actually increased(from 10,972 to 13,520) during that same period—offsetting a more significant decline in farms.


    http://www.vhib.org/virginia-equine-...act-study.html


    In NY [2012]

    The horse industry has a $4.2 billion effect on the New York state’s economy and generates 33,000 full-time jobs. Commerce related to the industry accounts for $187 million in state and local taxes for New York, according to the New York State Equine Industry Economic Impact Study.


    http://www.bizjournals.com/albany/ne...ibutes-42.html



    done by Deloitte Consulting LLP


    Highlights of the national study include:
    There are 9.2 million horses in the United States.

    4.6 million Americans are involved in the industry as horse owners, service providers, employees and volunteers. Tens of millions more participate as spectators.

    2 million people own horses.

    The horse industry has a direct economic effect on the U.S.of $39 billion annually.

    The industry has a $102 billion impact on the U.S.economy when the multiplier effect of spending by industry suppliers and employees is taken into account.

    Including off-site spending of spectators would result in an even higher figure.
    The industry directly provides 460,000 full-time equivalent (FTE) jobs.
    Spending by suppliers and employees generates additional jobs for a total employment impact of 1.4 million FTE jobs.

    The horse industry pays $1.9 billion in taxes to all levels of government.

    There are horses in every state. Forty-five states have at least 20,000 horses each.



    http://www.horsecouncil.org/national...horse-industry


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  8. #388
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    Quote Originally Posted by andylover View Post
    Using, as an example, the warnings imposed by the Federal govt to post on cigarette packing at the expense of the govt and the cigarette companies that smoking causes cancer, birth defects etc. I find it challenging at best to think that extensive testing wasnt perfomed before the manufacturers to banamine, bute, wormers etc. before the warnings were labeled didntdo their homework. Once the labeling is to include warnings not for human consumption then without confirmed results to prove otherwise then the labeling exists for a reason. However even with the labeling with the addition of horse meat to the food chain in the US and those who already consume tainted meat - those may be first to file a lawsuit against the manfufacturer when after eating horsemeat they develop cancer.
    So guessing the companies that produce those products with the health warnings are saving their own finacial butts by attempting to stop liable cases with continued testing to the health risks.
    Many times pharmaceutical companies apply a label not because their testing has shown a negative effect, but because there is not testing.

    For example, warnings against using drug X in children under age Y.
    That's not there because the studies they did showed the drug harmed children under the age of Y, but because testing on kids that age and under isn't available nor financially worth doing.

    Drugs effects in pregnant women. Again a population not excited to sign up to test drugs and the effects on themselves or their unborn children.


    Notoriously hard to get test subjects of certain groups and for certain drugs with limited or no expected benefit for that specific population for the use of the drug in that population,... well, there's no reason to do the testing to begin with.

    I don't know that this is the reason there are so few studies on these primarily veterinary drugs and their effects of administered to people [whether directly dosed or via consumption of an animal who was dosed], but it's possible.


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  9. #389
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela Freda View Post
    Many times pharmaceutical companies apply a label not because their testing has shown a negative effect, but because there is not testing.

    For example, warnings against using drug X in children under age Y.
    That's not there because the studies they did showed the drug harmed children under the age of Y, but because testing on kids that age and under isn't available nor financially worth doing.

    Drugs effects in pregnant women. Again a population not excited to sign up to test drugs and the effects on themselves or their unborn children.


    Notoriously hard to get test subjects of certain groups and for certain drugs with limited or no expected benefit for that specific population for the use of the drug in that population,... well, there's no reason to do the testing to begin with.

    I don't know that this is the reason there are so few studies on these primarily veterinary drugs and their effects of administered to people [whether directly dosed or via consumption of an animal who was dosed], but it's possible.
    That is true, why spend millions to test a drug for a very small market?

    As for the comment that horses have a greater economic impact alive, well, that long post is moot question for those horses that we have NO USE for, that become a liability then to dispose of at our cost, as thru animal control.

    Remember, horses are not widgets we can get in an order for so many, fabricate that number and then shut the line and not make any more.

    Horses are bred for many reasons, not just because someone orders so many for a certain use.
    What we have to do is figure what to do with those that then are not finding some use.
    SOME of those is what we have been using one more time thru slaughter.
    Why waste what we can get from the natural, renewable resource SOME of those horses can be thru slaughter, on a whim from some fringe animal rights extremists?



  10. #390
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    That is true, why spend millions to test a drug for a very small market?

    As for the comment that horses have a greater economic impact alive, well, that long post is moot question for those horses that we have NO USE for, that become a liability then to dispose of at our cost, as thru animal control.

    Remember, horses are not widgets we can get in an order for so many, fabricate that number and then shut the line and not make any more.

    Horses are bred for many reasons, not just because someone orders so many for a certain use.
    What we have to do is figure what to do with those that then are not finding some use.
    SOME of those is what we have been using one more time thru slaughter.
    Why waste what we can get from the natural, renewable resource SOME of those horses can be thru slaughter, on a whim from some fringe animal rights extremists?
    Because the market for that meat is drying up, come July, when the EU will require clean passports for the 100,000 horses the US ships to them to slaughter for human consumption who do not have a passport.

    Keep ignoring the elephant in the room if you want...


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  11. #391
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela Freda View Post
    Because the market for that meat is drying up, come July, when the EU will require clean passports for the 100,000 horses the US ships to them to slaughter for human consumption who do not have a passport.

    Keep ignoring the elephant in the room if you want...
    You are not listening.
    The european market is not that large and they have plenty of other suppliers than the USA horses.
    There are much larger markets that use real science, know what residues really mean and don't have scaremongering animal rights extremist groups pushing their myths.



  12. #392
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    Looks like the low demand in the EU is causing a problem for at least one Canadian slaughterhouse.

    http://news.nationalpost.com/2013/03...rta-horsemeat/
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  13. #393
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    Quote Originally Posted by jetsmom View Post
    Well El Paso is 75% Hispanic, and we are the safest city in the nation compared to other cities of our size...I'd say that is a large concentration of an ethnic group. Many do not speak English. Kind of disproves your theory. (Oh...and we also have a very low avg income, and high number of illegal aliens).
    El Paso is a great city. I have a good friend who owns a home management company with his wife and sister. It has been very successful AND El Paso was where Californians were purchasing investment property.

    Many years ago...in the 70's..I was taking a bus from Florida to Santa Barbara and there was a lunch stop over in El Paso. I did not discover I had left my pack with wallet, passport etc...money at the restaurant. Next stop we called them..expecting to hear it had been stolen...and it turns out a customer turned it into the manager...they sent it on to me.

    My theory...nah...the study done by Anne was primarily done at Brooks Alberta where there is a meat slaughter plant (no horses) and it is staffed by Somalians. That is why there is a huge disconnect. Plants in Ontario that she studied ALSO had Somalian employees in great numbers

    El Paso could support a slaughter plant. The transition between spanish and english is consistent..however many in San Diego would challenge your comments about safe as would friends in Tucson and Phoenix. There is much violence due to conflicts arising from Mexican versus others issues.

    I do not think that slaughter plants are any more ressponsible for violence than police forces are for wife beating



  14. #394
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    Quote Originally Posted by jetsmom View Post
    And 800000 horses die by other than slaughter each year, and horsehair is an item that RENDERERS can use/obtain easily without killing perfectly healthy horses for their meat.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    Are you serious?
    All those pages and you have not realized yet that slaughter is where SOME horses are used one more time, as the natural, renewable resource SOME horses can be for us thru slaughter, horses that are going to be DEAD anyway, the solutions those for banning slaughter give for those SOME horses is to have animal control kill them and send them to the landfill?

    In what crazy world does that make any sense, to have an asset those horses are thru slaughter and now ban that process to waste it all on a whim of some animal rights extremists and their followers?
    jetsmom has a good point here. The only extra asset coming from slaughter that can't come from rendering is meat. The meat from the slaughtered horses goes overseas and who profits from selling the meat? The foreign owned companies that are backing the slaughter houses!

    I guess you are okay with the money made from the MEAT going to people other than U.S. citizens. We all know the people doing the dirty work aren't going to profit.
    Proud owner of a Slaughter-Bound TB from a feedlot, and her surprise baby...!
    http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e350/Jen4USC/fave.jpg
    http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e3...SC/running.jpg


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  15. #395
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    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    Looks like the low demand in the EU is causing a problem for at least one Canadian slaughterhouse.

    http://news.nationalpost.com/2013/03...rta-horsemeat/
    Of course they are going to complain and say busines is down. No diffferent than when Mad Cow stopped all beef exports to the U.S. (Thank you R-Calf...even though the president of R Calf has his cattle just across a barb wire fence on the Montana....Alberta border)...nothing about safety...alll about money

    When they claim business is down...woe is us...they will apply for government support.

    Only a couple of plants are actively going after the Asian market like Ft. MacLeod is. But then..they are a leader. The same plant you quoted was also the "talk piece" for the rumour that ALL equine melats were banned fromn Europe and they were going to need a bail out. They would not accept any American trucks with equines stating they did not want to be stuck with them.

    However...thge truth was...they were right back in business that Wednesday when they accepted THIRTEEN truck loads.

    So much is new and is going to cause confusion. The label problem however was NOT from Canada nor Mexico... It was from EUROPEAN sources.

    Demand also dropped during the summer...all businesses know there will be glitches and ups and downs.



  16. #396
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    Quote Originally Posted by jenm View Post
    jetsmom has a good point here. The only extra asset coming from slaughter that can't come from rendering is meat. The meat from the slaughtered horses goes overseas and who profits from selling the meat? The foreign owned companies that are backing the slaughter houses!

    I guess you are okay with the money made from the MEAT going to people other than U.S. citizens. We all know the people doing the dirty work aren't going to profit.
    Back to economics....year one

    The slaughter plant is employing AMERICANS right in the United States.

    Wallmart has clothing manufactured in CHINA where they pay very little..but NO AMERICANS are employed except in their stores.

    Weston foods of Canada owns Wonder Bread and around 60% of all major U.S. Bakery companies. Royal Bank of Canada owns Wells Fargo (52%). Ever see T.D. Waterhouse...Toronto Dominion..Canadian Bank. Ever see BMO...Bank of Montreal...Canadian...U.S. companies own foreign companies...anbd here is the kicker...they don't even pay income tax back to the U.S. They keep everything off shore.

    Your point demonstrates a clear lack of knowledge....back to the books for you...



  17. #397
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    You are not listening.
    The european market is not that large and they have plenty of other suppliers than the USA horses.
    There are much larger markets that use real science, know what residues really mean and don't have scaremongering animal rights extremist groups pushing their myths.
    Fairfax "Only a couple of plants are actively going after the Asian market like Ft. MacLeod is. "
    So which is it, Asia is a big importer, or not?

    Canada's horsemeat industry

    In 2011:
    • Canada's four federally licensed slaughterhouses killed 89,348 horses
    • Canadians consumed about 300 tonnes of horsemeat
    • Canada exported 13,489,000 kg of horsemeat to Europe


    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/story/...da-foodie.html

    Table 2: Value and volume of meat of horses, asses, mules or hinnies, chilled or frozen (020500) exported to Belgium, France and the Netherlands in 2011
    [it shows country of origin/slaughter,*incl Canada... so the amounts sent to EU vs others is clearly shown]

    Canada to:
    Belgium 45,784 [100 KG]
    France 18,362

    on page 2 of
    http://www.hsi.org/assets/pdfs/horse...on_Oct2012.pdf

    from:
    Data extracted from Eurostat database , EU27 Trade Since 1995 By HS6. Accessed 7th September 2012.



    By the way the 6 month hold/feedlot thing is for the EID not passports:

    Since 31 July 2010 it has been required that horses destined for slaughter should be accompanied by a signed (by the last owner) Affidavit documenting the identity and the non-use of growth promoters and medical treatments for the previous six months in order to document the eligibility of the animals to be slaughtered for export to the EU.

    Council Directives 96/22/EC and 96/23/EC."
    The CCA undertook, in the absence of legal requirements for having medical treatment records, to discuss with the industry, either a compulsory participation in a quality assurance scheme or require a Livestock Information Sheet with the compulsory information included as a prerequisite for EU-
    eligibility of the horses. An action plan for exports of horse meat produced by the CFIA in response to the request of 17 April 2009 (by letter from the Commission Services) to Third Countries exporting horse meat to the
    EU to implement systems on equine ID, traceability and keeping of medical records in order to provide equivalent guarantees to those provided for in EU legislation was forwarded to the Commission Services on 23 October 2009. The action plan was evaluated and was acceptable.
    Nevertheless, the CFIA was requested to update the Commission Services concerning guarantees that could be delivered by the US authorities regarding the treatment history of US horses exported to Canada for direct slaughter or rearing....

    From 31 July 2010 slaughterhouses exporting horse meat must have a system of records of all animals for slaughter including individual description, records of illness and treatment (for the last six months) and a so-called Equine Identification Document (the EID), signed by the owner as an affidavit. The EID is applicable for all horses including Canadian and US horses. Both US and
    Canadian horses for slaughter have to be accompanied by an EID and moreover the US horses are accompanied by a health certificate and an owner-shipper certificate.


    Treatment records
    • The imported horses from the US were accompanied by the signed Affidavit (EID) of the last owner, covering the medical treatment during the last six months, which in many cases was a horse dealer. Nevertheless, no official guarantee was received by the CFIA from the US authorities that this guarantee was verified and could be considered as reliable.


    Live horses for immediate slaughter are imported from the US. According to the CFIA, approximately 66 000 live horses were imported annually from the US for immediate slaughter out of a total annual slaughter of horses of approximately 93 000. All of these horses were slaughtered in EU approved premises.




    http://archive.constantcontact.com/f...487022880.html


    The majority of Canadian horsemeat is exported to European and Asian countries, and Canada is currently the largest exporter of horsemeat to Europe. In 2012, Canada exported 2.1 million kilograms of horsemeat to Switzerland, which represented the highest valued horsemeat export market for Canada last year.

    http://blogs.montrealgazette.com/201...anada-release/



    Canadians consume about 650,000 pounds of horse meat and export about 30 million pounds of it each year, ...

    http://metronews.ca/features/horse-m...ss-in-alberta/
    Last edited by Angela Freda; Mar. 5, 2013 at 11:33 AM.



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    Bluey - I am hardly a nutjob or connected to PETA as you would like to "label" me or anyone else who opposes horse slaughter. Yes, I am an animal activist and proudly wear that label as it applies to someone who cares about animal welfare. I get really sick of people deciding that the best way to "fix" a "problem" with animals is to simply kill them and walk away. Why indeed does a horse have to have a "last use" as dinner? I actively work in rescue of pet animals and horses constantly -- wish I was smarter and more wealthy and could do more. But I refuse to accept that slaughter is the answer. It wouldn't matter if breeding was all done by discriminating breeders and there were better laws about horsekeeping or any other way you might consider -- there would still be those who neglect or abuse them and throw them away because they simply don't care. I don't care if horses have been eaten over the years or it's accepted in Europe or Asia -- it's wrong! With horse slaughter many very viable, young and nice horses are quickly snapped up for slaughter instead of getting a real chance. I doubt seriously it will be monitored down every avenue as far as transport, care or the actual kill floor to insure "humane" treatment. It's just another disgusting thing that people do to a very noble creature for reasons of greed who deserve much better. If it weren't for Tippi Hedren, Defenders of Wildlife, Causes and other groups who monitor and make a difference, the plight of animals would be much worse. I started this thread so that those who wish could email or call the governor's office and say "NO" to the repeal of the ban on horse slaughter. If you feel differently, fine. However, denigrating those who are against it and labeling us in a derogatory manner is total *BS*!
    PennyG


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #399
    Join Date
    Jun. 19, 2011
    Posts
    3,057

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    Jenn Living in California...how lucky...Bay area..Tiburon???


    83% of big U.S companies, contractors use offshore tax havens
    GAO: 83% of big U.S companies, contractors use offshore tax havens
    Jan 16 (Washington Post) - The US Government Accountability Office (GAO) has just issued a report showing that 83 of the 100 largest publicly traded corporations and 63 of the 100 largest federal contractors rely on offshore subsidiaries to do business and cut their tax bills. Some have received tens of billions in bailout money: Citigroup, for example, has received $25 billion from the bailout fund, plus $300 billion in government guarantees — and has 427 tax haven subsidiaries; 91 in Luxembourg, 90 in the Cayman Islands and 35 in the British Virgin Islands


    http://taxjustice.blogspot.ca/2009/0...ws-jan-17.html



  20. #400
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    Quote Originally Posted by TKR View Post
    Bluey - I am hardly a nutjob or connected to PETA as you would like to "label" me or anyone else who opposes horse slaughter. Yes, I am an animal activist and proudly wear that label as it applies to someone who cares about animal welfare. I get really sick of people deciding that the best way to "fix" a "problem" with animals is to simply kill them and walk away. Why indeed does a horse have to have a "last use" as dinner? I actively work in rescue of pet animals and horses constantly -- wish I was smarter and more wealthy and could do more. But I refuse to accept that slaughter is the answer. It wouldn't matter if breeding was all done by discriminating breeders and there were better laws about horsekeeping or any other way you might consider -- there would still be those who neglect or abuse them and throw them away because they simply don't care. I don't care if horses have been eaten over the years or it's accepted in Europe or Asia -- it's wrong! With horse slaughter many very viable, young and nice horses are quickly snapped up for slaughter instead of getting a real chance. I doubt seriously it will be monitored down every avenue as far as transport, care or the actual kill floor to insure "humane" treatment. It's just another disgusting thing that people do to a very noble creature for reasons of greed who deserve much better. If it weren't for Tippi Hedren, Defenders of Wildlife, Causes and other groups who monitor and make a difference, the plight of animals would be much worse. I started this thread so that those who wish could email or call the governor's office and say "NO" to the repeal of the ban on horse slaughter. If you feel differently, fine. However, denigrating those who are against it and labeling us in a derogatory manner is total *BS*!
    PennyG
    Hey, you made my point for me, thanks.



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