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  1. #41
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    Jan. 31, 2007
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    A little over at the knee doesn't bother me, conformation-wise. I had a weaver for 10 years, and I had to be specially choosy about which shows to go to. I ended up with her because the seller couldn't find anyone who would buyher with the weaving problem. I learned to work around it and she was a super sound, terrific horse. Had her 10 years, and then sold her to a forever home...she is still jumping wonderfully and is turned out 24/7....so no more weaving problem.
    I would trust your gut when buying horses, but that's just me. And, buying any horse has a lot of risk attached to it. Buy something you love.



  2. #42
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
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    Fort Collins, CO
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    Quote Originally Posted by blame_the_champagne View Post
    I just got pictures of her from those days (cringe!) and I'm wondering if she has ulcers from the previous race career + malnutrition. Maybe when we treat those the cribbing will lessen? Here's to hoping for a good month and a clean vet check!
    It's a good bet that's she's got ulcers. Treating her with omeprazole is a good idea.

    Also have a good dentist check her mouth. Teeth are often neglected in lower level claimers.


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  3. #43
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    Dec. 30, 2010
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    152

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    Quote Originally Posted by blame_the_champagne View Post
    She was rescued from a low end auction (many kill buyers) because she was half starved and wasn't going to sell to a good home. I just got pictures of her from those days (cringe!) and I'm wondering if she has ulcers from the previous race career + malnutrition. Maybe when we treat those the cribbing will lessen? Here's to hoping for a good month and a clean vet check!
    I think you will find a lot of her problems will originate from her less-than-ideal track life. I'd treat for ulcers and have her teeth done for sure. One of my current horses came from a similar situation, and he was a stall walking, weaving wreck when I got him. Once he figured out the routine and adjusted to non-track life, the stall walking and weaving pretty much stopped. He's out half the day, which is a big help.

    As for the rest of the stuff, if she is "that ride" for you, the rest doesn't matter. I've owned cribbers and weavers and neither really bothers me as long as they are "that ride".


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  4. #44
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    Jan. 9, 2013
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    256

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    I've had her on trial since Wednesday and she hasn't cribbed or weaved once (and I've spent HOURS in her stall, obserserving her, grooming her, etc.)!!! We'll see, but so far so good.

    However, bad news is that when my ferrier hoof tested her she was very sore everhwere but right front. She was severely overtrimmed (and barefoot on concrete) when rescued in October. The big concern, according to ferrier, is PEDAL OSTEITIS: http://www.anvilmag.com/farrier/012f4.htm. Ferrier is worried because she's been sore/inalmmed internally for so long now that it could have done permanent bone damage (not reversible), esp. if it was going on for years while she was developing/growing.

    I'm super worried, because I think she's wonderful! Any experience with this? Has anyone else bought/rescued a horse that was sore for a long period for a long period of time? Did they heal? Was there long term damage? Did you x-ray?

    http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=...type=3&theater

    http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=...type=3&theater



  5. #45
    Join Date
    Jul. 25, 2003
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    Boston Area
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    At this point I think you need to bring a vet in and get their opinion and films if necessary.

    If she's just sore, hoof boots with pads could help but you need to know what's going on with those feet.
    Equine Ink - My soapbox for equestrian writings & reviews.
    EquestrianHow2 - Operating instructions for your horse.


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  6. #46
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2005
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    PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by blame_the_champagne View Post
    I'm super worried, because I think she's wonderful! Any experience with this? Has anyone else bought/rescued a horse that was sore for a long period for a long period of time? Did they heal? Was there long term damage? Did you x-ray?

    Yes to x--ray, it was how we found that the horse had pedal osteitis. And the horse did go on and do just fine--shoeing change (pads) and time. It will depend on the x-ray though. Good luck with her!
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **


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  7. #47
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2011
    Location
    Cynthiana KY (~40 min. NE of Lexington)
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    I don't know how recent the videos were that you just posted, but she looks pretty sound to me. Granted the footing is cushy, but... She's a very attractive mover. I'd say vet her and go on with it. She was only $500, I think I remember you saying in a previous post. That's a lot of horse for $500, IMHO.

    Sheila
    Sheila Zeltt
    Chestnut Run Stable & Zeltt Racing Stable
    www.Zeltt.com
    Standing "Tiz Brian" at Stud, 16.1 h bay TB by Tiznow


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  8. #48
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
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    Fort Collins, CO
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    I agree that she needs to be vetted. I know she's a "cheap" horse, but the unsound ones cost just as much to keep--usually more--than the sound ones. I'd go into it with a VERY good idea of what your "stop, this is enough" point is. For me, at least, on a horse like this? I'll radiograph one joint. If the vet feels looking at more than one is necessary, I walk.

    Her racing record is suspicious. She looked like a horse just one race away from breaking her maiden and then her last three starts are terrible. Serious drop in form. And then dumped at a killer sale? Super, super suspicious. (Oh, she "stumbled at the start" of her last good race. Still went on to finish 2nd, but would wonder if she was injured there. You can watch the race here and it looks like she did stumble badly.)



  9. #49
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    Jan. 9, 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by fairtheewell View Post
    I hope you finally just buy this mare and turn her into what she is talented to do...you don't "ride" cribbing and weaving (those can be managed). You love everything about this mare. Your heart has told you this already..circumstances have told you this already...Just do it and don't look back. If she ends up a superstar nobody will care if she cribs and weaves.

    How's that for enabling!!!
    Took your advice and have her on trial. Not a crib nor a weave in sight since Wednesday. Perfect behavior; happy horse. However, she was positive for soreness when hoof tested. See my post "Horse Shopping Drama. How should I proceed?" to give me more great advice



  10. #50
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    Jan. 9, 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simkie View Post

    Her racing record is suspicious. She looked like a horse just one race away from breaking her maiden and then her last three starts are terrible. Serious drop in form. And then dumped at a killer sale? Super, super suspicious. (Oh, she "stumbled at the start" of her last good race. Still went on to finish 2nd, but would wonder if she was injured there. You can watch the race here and it looks like she did stumble badly.)
    Yes, I agree. It makes me very nervous. I can't decide if it's worth the risk??? But my heart just goes out to this sweet filly who's had such a terrible time in life so far. I know I can't rescue them all, but if I could rescue just one and get a nice horse out of it I'd be stoked. They also kept her for eleven months after her last race (rehabing said mystery injury and starving her???) before they dumped her (disgusting). They kept her brother (who also stopped racing) for those eleven months and took them together to the kill auction (both severely emaciated). I'm hoping maybe the owner ran out of money and hung on to them for a while, hoping to get back in the game, but it could very likely be an injury situation. The rescuer said she talked to the trainer and he said she was never injured, just too slow, but of course we'd take his word with a serious grain of salt.



  11. #51
    Join Date
    Dec. 6, 2000
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    SE Mass
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    FYI, my OTTB is now 21, we evented Novice for many years, fox-hunted, etc. He would always hoof test positive if the farrier did it a certain way. Farrier told me that. Horse was sound until he was 16, then we started to lower what he did, because he was sore after drops, and I didn't have the funds to make him comfortable doing more, so we did what he was happy to do. Stopped jumping him at 18. Really not that bad a career for a horse that had very sensitive feet. Admittedly, next time, I want a horse with perfect feet, but I am sure that something else will be a problem. So if Xrays are OK, and she is sound a passes the vet, maybe she is just a wimp when hoof-tested like my guy. My horse is still sound most days with no bute, but if we were to jump if would hurt his tootsies. Not too bad at 21.


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  12. #52
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    Aug. 25, 2005
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    Northeast
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    Please. please, -In both your posts about this mare, it is fArrier.


    Also, I have owned and known tender footed horses. They did not have pedal osteitis, they just liked making me pay for shoes.

    So get the radiographs, after the vet looks at her. His price sounds pretty reasonable for the pics. It sounds as though in the process of not feeding her, they also neglected her feet, and then had their car mechanic brother-in-law trim her.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.


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  13. #53
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    Apr. 14, 2001
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    Fort Collins, CO
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    Quote Originally Posted by blame_the_champagne View Post
    Yes, I agree. It makes me very nervous. I can't decide if it's worth the risk??? But my heart just goes out to this sweet filly who's had such a terrible time in life so far. I know I can't rescue them all, but if I could rescue just one and get a nice horse out of it I'd be stoked. They also kept her for eleven months after her last race (rehabing said mystery injury and starving her???) before they dumped her (disgusting). They kept her brother (who also stopped racing) for those eleven months and took them together to the kill auction (both severely emaciated). I'm hoping maybe the owner ran out of money and hung on to them for a while, hoping to get back in the game, but it could very likely be an injury situation. The rescuer said she talked to the trainer and he said she was never injured, just too slow, but of course we'd take his word with a serious grain of salt.
    This mare was definitely NOT "too slow." She had back to back seconds, running for a $32,000 claiming tag and damned near won--TWICE. Not only was she super close to breaking her maiden, there is a LOT of room to go down in cheaper claiming races. (Our cheapest claiming price here at Arapahoe Park is a TENTH of what this mare was running for.) There's a reason why she went from running really well to running last. She was hurt, or she started bleeding through lasix or *something.*

    Do you know for sure that the people who brought her to the auction are the people who last raced her? Perhaps her racetrack connections gave her away to what they thought was a good home, but those owners didn't feed her and then took her to the sale?



  14. #54
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    Jun. 30, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by merrygoround View Post
    Please. please, -In both your posts about this mare, it is fArrier.
    Perhaps her man is french or trained in France, in which case he is a ferrier - Alain has Ferrier on his truck though he's been working in English speaking Canada for a long while



  15. #55
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    Aug. 25, 2005
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    Northeast
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    Quote Originally Posted by alto View Post
    Perhaps her man is french or trained in France, in which case he is a ferrier - Alain has Ferrier on his truck though he's been working in English speaking Canada for a long while
    Ah!
    Noun
    ferrier (plural ferriers)
    (obsolete) a ferryman

    And perhaps, he is all wet.

    I will be very curious as to a veterinarian's opinion on the feet, and perhaps the whole horse. So until Mon, Adieu!!!!
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  16. #56
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    Jul. 2, 2012
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    I used to be one of those who said vices didn't bother me... until I owned a horse who cribbed all his life to the point where he wore his top teeth completely down and could barely eat in his older years. That was with wearing a collar his whole life, and having tried every kind of collar on the market. Never again!



  17. #57
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    Jul. 24, 2007
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    98

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    I realized today. At work. That I am the horse equivalent of a weaver. I wiggle a leg or knock my knees together constantly (quietly) all day long. Not because of stress, or ulcers or any number of things. It is just something I do. And I am 51 and completely sound.
    We have several cribbers and a weaver at my barn. They are dealt with accordingly. Toys, collars, turn out and most of all correct diets to their needs. The cribber plus weaver is an awesome athlete (not my own btw) and the most adorable, much loved horse you could imagine. It is just something he does. My two cents worth.



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