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  1. #21
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    Jun. 30, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by enjoytheride View Post
    OMG super cute. The only thing I don't like is his head is a little big and his neck a little short.
    I bet he grows into his head he's not yet 4, I believe.

    Definitely ask for some u/s video, also some grooming/tacking/handling as he looks pretty tense in that "liberty" footage (may just be the indoor).

    Depending on the snow/ice level, see if you can get some field footage; the farm seems a wonderful place to be a horse & if he's been living in a herd situation he'll have great horse/horse skills.

    Of course, it's only 3 hours could be a great day trip if the roads & weather cooperate



  2. #22
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    Feb. 3, 2000
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    Nokesville, VA
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    Quote Originally Posted by enjoytheride View Post
    OMG super cute. The only thing I don't like is his head is a little big and his neck a little short.
    I'd much rather have a big head on a short neck than a big head on a long neck!!!.
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
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    Jun. 1, 2002
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    Indiana
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    Hey, his head size wouldn't stop me. I just couldn't think of anything else besides "squeee cute!"



  4. #24
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    Dec. 13, 2012
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    Thanks for the input! I agree he does look quite tense in the video and wasn't terribly fond of the canter, mostly due to his bunny hopping his back legs and not reaching under him. Could just be nerves and the fact that he's being chased! Question for those of you who own connies- is four too young to start regular work and some jumping once he's good on the flat? Not too familiar with the general growing patterns of these guys, and I'd like something to be able to take to a couple of little events this year. For those of you who are curious about his pedigree, here's his mom and dad's!

    http://www.devonridgefarm.com/Avenn%...20Pedigree.htm

    http://www.devonridgefarm.com/Dillons%20Gallery.htm



  5. #25
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    Jul. 19, 2003
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    Middleburg, VA
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    This is why I hate videos of horses being "at liberty"....or, more accurately, being chased! It rarely shows them in a good light. They bunny hop, go around tense, often with their heads straight up and their backs hollowed out and their tails flipped over their backs. It just is not an appealing way to show off a young horse's gaits!

    That being said, I would still go see him and ride him. He's very appealing.

    As to your question about what you could do with him, I, personally, would not hesitate to do some jumping and, if he's progressing well and has as good a brain as he seems, taking him on some little outings later on this year.



  6. #26
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    Feb. 3, 2000
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    Nokesville, VA
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    4 is definitely not too young to start serious work. Many of them are out competing at 4.

    He has very nice bloodlines.

    Smithereen is the sire of Hideaway's Erin Go Bragh who was a very succssful eventer.

    Spring Ledge Bantry Bay is one of the "grand old men" of US Connemara breeding.

    The dam's bloodlines are nothing to sneeze at either. Texas Hope (1/2 TB) is one of the US foundation sires. Some people like him and some don't (he also appears further back in the pedigree several more times).

    He should be a good jumper. You will have to assess him in person to see what his dressage will be like- I agree that the "chased around" video doesn't tell you much.

    Quote Originally Posted by horsenic View Post
    Thanks for the input! I agree he does look quite tense in the video and wasn't terribly fond of the canter, mostly due to his bunny hopping his back legs and not reaching under him. Could just be nerves and the fact that he's being chased! Question for those of you who own connies- is four too young to start regular work and some jumping once he's good on the flat? Not too familiar with the general growing patterns of these guys, and I'd like something to be able to take to a couple of little events this year. For those of you who are curious about his pedigree, here's his mom and dad's!

    http://www.devonridgefarm.com/Avenn%...20Pedigree.htm

    http://www.devonridgefarm.com/Dillons%20Gallery.htm
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #27
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    Jul. 9, 2002
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    405

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    I have a 5 year old, that I started as a 3 year old, and started jumping and did some schooling shows as a 4 year old. I dont jump big stuff (2'9), but I try to get her out alot and this seems to have served her well. Connemaras seem to have a short neck for a while compared to their heads. Atleast all of mine did ...and they seem to grow into the head around age 6. I think in general, they have short necks. I am fairly new to the breed though.



  8. #28
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    Feb. 3, 2000
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    Nokesville, VA
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    If you look at the breed standard, they are SUPPOSED to have a long back, which makes the neck look short in comparison.

    As long as they can graze without bending their knees, or splaying their legs, I consider the neck long enough.
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).



  9. #29
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    Oct. 23, 2000
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    Illinois
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    I think you could have an absolute blast with him. Get him out on a lot of trail rides that can include jumping little logs, going through water, different terrain, etc. and he should be able to get to some very small events later this year.

    Love the bloodlines!



  10. #30
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    Apr. 20, 2009
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    Raeford, North Carolina
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    Okay, he is a '10' on the cute scale. Go try him!
    "Drawing on my fine command of the English language, I said nothing" - Robert Benchley
    Cotton would fight.
    http://buildingthegrove.blogspot.com/



  11. #31
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    May. 2, 2007
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    Luthersville, GA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janet View Post
    4 is definitely not too young to start serious work. Many of them are out competing at 4.

    He has very nice bloodlines.

    Smithereen is the sire of Hideaway's Erin Go Bragh who was a very succssful eventer.

    Spring Ledge Bantry Bay is one of the "grand old men" of US Connemara breeding.

    The dam's bloodlines are nothing to sneeze at either. Texas Hope (1/2 TB) is one of the US foundation sires. Some people like him and some don't (he also appears further back in the pedigree several more times).

    He should be a good jumper. You will have to assess him in person to see what his dressage will be like- I agree that the "chased around" video doesn't tell you much.
    Janet beat me to it. He has a very good pedigree for sport. Both his sire and dam have had long and successful performance careers. He's got a lot of TB blood close up, so I wouldn't be surprised if he ends up in the 15 hd range. The ponies often aren't done growing until they're 5 or 6. The coming 5 (in June) year old I just sold grew 3/4" in 3 months.

    The canter is hard to judge, but he has a lovely trot, and his sire is a very nice mover. Haven't seen any video of his dam.

    It'd be worth the drive, Jocelyn is lovely, and you should be able to see his sire, dam and multiple half-siblings.
    Fade to Grey Farm
    Eventing, Foxhunting & Connemaras
    *NEW* website:www.fadetogreyfarm.com



  12. #32
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    May. 2, 2007
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    Luthersville, GA
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    PS I love your 'different approach', Connemaras are incredible ponies!
    Fade to Grey Farm
    Eventing, Foxhunting & Connemaras
    *NEW* website:www.fadetogreyfarm.com



  13. #33
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    Dec. 13, 2012
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    Thanks! I'm excited to go try him. Jocelyn promises I won't be disappointed! Nice to know he has a good pedigree on him as well, I have no clue how to decipher anything Connemara related in regards to breeding



  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by horsenic View Post
    Thanks! I'm excited to go try him. Jocelyn promises I won't be disappointed!
    DON'T forget your video camera!!!

    & make your camera operator do some practise runs in the meantime if it's been awhile


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #35
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    Feb. 3, 2000
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janet View Post
    Texas Hope (1/2 TB) is one of the US foundation sires. Some people like him and some don't (he also appears further back in the pedigree several more times).
    Here is a thread about the influence of Texas Hope and Little Heaven.

    http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/sh...le-Heaven-quot
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).



  16. #36
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    Sep. 11, 2010
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    The Sunny South
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    Buying a nice young connemara is like investing in something long term - they are hardy, tractable, well sized for most adults (big bodies), sure footed, athletic, and usually stay fat on air. They are the kind of horse you buy for yourself, for your kids, for your husband to ride, for grandma to hop on, etc. Then, if you have a down period, you lease them out to the five or six families who would be wanting to lease said pony.

    I used to ride connemaras and love them. I plan to get one as a "second horse" one day down the road when I can justify another mouth to feed!
    My boy, "Mr. Nice Guy"

    Ask me about Final Furlong, Inc. - promoting "Responsible retirement for thoroughbred racehorses through the racing industry".


    2 members found this post helpful.

  17. #37
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    Dec. 13, 2012
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    Ya I really do love the breed. Well I'm going to look at a couple of TBs the same time as him so we'll see who wins me over!



  18. #38
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    Mar. 1, 2003
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    Happily in Canada
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    I used to live in the Edmonton area - Jocelyn Davies is a nice lady with nice horses. I love this gelding's eye and expression. Best of luck!
    Blugal

    You never know what kind of obsessive compulsive crazy person you are until another person imitates your behaviour at a three-day. --Gry2Yng


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #39
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    Mar. 12, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janet View Post
    Here is a thread about the influence of Texas Hope and Little Heaven.

    http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/sh...le-Heaven-quot
    OMG, your link led to a wonderful article about Rocky that I had not seen before. I think he is my favorite horse after Spectacular Bid. OP, you can't go wrong with a cute connemara!
    "All top hat and no canter". *Graureiter*



  20. #40
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    May. 2, 2007
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    Luthersville, GA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fractious Fox View Post
    Buying a nice young connemara is like investing in something long term - they are hardy, tractable, well sized for most adults (big bodies), sure footed, athletic, and usually stay fat on air. They are the kind of horse you buy for yourself, for your kids, for your husband to ride, for grandma to hop on, etc. Then, if you have a down period, you lease them out to the five or six families who would be wanting to lease said pony.

    I used to ride connemaras and love them. I plan to get one as a "second horse" one day down the road when I can justify another mouth to feed!
    Well said. My long term (Connemara) investment takes me foxhunting, wins his dressage classes, has clear rounds at the jumper shows, and at the end of the month we will make our debut at Intermediate. He is a pony of a lifetime!
    Fade to Grey Farm
    Eventing, Foxhunting & Connemaras
    *NEW* website:www.fadetogreyfarm.com



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