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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 5, 2012
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    206

    Default Honest Opinions of my TB, Please

    Update: I've decided to keep and work with him. His videos are no longer up. Thank you to everyone who responded! I really appreciate the advice.

    --------------
    I'm an advanced beginner with about eight months of lessons under my belt coming off a several month knee and back injury that has kept me out of the saddle. I had previously decided to sell my horse not knowing how long it would take me to heal, but it looks like I'll be able to return to normal activity within a few weeks.

    This has led me to question selling my horse. He's a lovely, sensitive, six year old Thoroughbred who is quite green. I bought him for just $600. Now I'm considering keeping him and investing in some serious training. I'm looking at Eric Dierks as I think his approach would suit my boy well. My main question is if the money would be well invested. I have no idea what to look for when I look at a horse for the mostpart.

    These are videos of my former training as she is helping me to sell him. He had not been worked in several months:

    His walk- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aEXusiGX2x0
    His trot- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eiYoMGh6hj4
    His canter- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QyIg_hHXjsM

    (I feel it's necessary to note I would of course reimburse her for her time if I choose not to sell.)

    I don't have any videos of his jump but we have jumped to about three feet and he seems to take to it well.

    So, what do you think? I'm not looking to ride in the Rolex or anything, but I would like to explore eventing.
    Last edited by lferguson; Feb. 26, 2013 at 11:23 AM. Reason: update



  2. #2
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    Apr. 6, 2004
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    Elkton
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    You've only had 8 months of lessons and you're jumping 3 feet? Call me a judgey wudgy bear but that seems a bit much. My first trainer took it very slowly with me (even coming from years of western pleasure background), but I wasn't jumping that high in that short amount of time.

    But that's a moo point (the kind a cow makes and doesn't matter...) if you like the horse and have a bond with it and he's safe, invest in the training. Horse shopping can suck, and if you like what you have keep it. He seems sweet!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
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    Dec. 5, 2012
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    Heh No, I appreciate any feedback. We only jumped that high a few times. I was mostly working on crossrails. My trainer knew I really wanted to jump and she indulged me. To be fair to her, my balance and body awareness are probably better than average after eight months as I'm a Pilates instructor, but I know I could spend years on flatwork with plenty to improve.

    Thanks for the response!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
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    El Paso, TX
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    Default

    I'm a hunter person, but he's a cute enough mover that he'd do well in local hunter shows and maybe more, once he is fit and using himself. (He took a couple of funny trot steps, but I am assuming it was cause he wasn't really moving forward, not that he was off). He has a nice canter, which will be even nicer when he is fit/balanced.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 9, 2005
    Location
    Unionville, PA
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    3,284

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    I really like him! I think he is worth putting the training into. (Besides, I agree with MC, horse shopping sucks!)
    Delaware Park Canter Volunteer
    http://www.canterusa.org/



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 17, 2009
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    The Mitten
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    My first thought is that he is sore somewhere... feet maybe? Is he shod?

    My next thought: he has a lovely hindquarter, just like a mare at our barn. Once she was started into a progressive training program (her owner became a working student) and built herself up, she became a fabulous mover and had jump to spare.


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  7. #7
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    Mar. 14, 2010
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    Earlysville, Virginia
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    I thought he looked incredibly sore and/or stiff? But I could only see partial videos due to iffy wifi
    Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
    White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

    Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.


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  8. #8
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    Jul. 10, 2006
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    Far far away
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    You're a very green rider, as you should be at 8 months into it and your horse is tolerating this like a saint. Keep him!!! And also find out why he's so stiff and not quite right. I can't pinpoint what's going on with him, but check for lyme if nothing shows up in his feet or back or ?????

    If you get him feeling really well, he may become a little playful, but if he does you can then think about selling him and finding a more appropriate horse.

    At this point in your riding you need much more balance before you canter. Please consider speaking with your trainer about moving forward more slowly. Was your injury from a fall from a horse?


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  9. #9
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    Dec. 5, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by SEPowell View Post
    You're a very green rider, as you should be at 8 months into it and your horse is tolerating this like a saint. Keep him!!! And also find out why he's so stiff and not quite right. I can't pinpoint what's going on with him, but check for lyme if nothing shows up in his feet or back or ?????

    If you get him feeling really well, he may become a little playful, but if he does you can then think about selling him and finding a more appropriate horse.

    At this point in your riding you need much more balance before you canter. Please consider speaking with your trainer about moving forward more slowly. Was your injury from a fall from a horse?
    The woman in the video is actually my former trainer.

    Newman is actually usually very forward, and though I wouldn't describe him as hot, "playful" seems about right. I'm not sure what happened prior to this video being shot as I wasn't present. He needs a lot of conditioning, so I imagine he's quite tired here from previous shots.

    My injuries were unrelated. I have yet to fall, despite an unexpected gallop we once took in an open field. (Knock on wood. haha)

    Perhaps he is stiff from the cold and hadn't properly warmed up. I really don't know, but as several of you have mentioned it, I'll definitely be looking into it. He has *ahem* Thoroughbred feet, and my farrier wants to shoe him in the spring, so perhaps the rough footing in the arena (which was obviously still under construction and let in rain) was hurting his feet. I've had several people look at his tack, and it does fit properly.

    Thank you all so much for the feedback! I'd appreciate any more comments anyone else has.



  10. #10
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    Oct. 10, 2007
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    down south
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    He's cute. I see something a little off as well though. He really drags his hind feet in all gaits and seems stiff. Stiffness can be normal though and with work and building him up physically can help that. I would check out why he drags his hind feet so much though. Like someone said maybe check lymes, or epm if there's nothing in the feet going on.
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole



  11. #11
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    Dec. 23, 2010
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    He looks like a good guy but as you say you are an advanced beginner and you own a green sensitive horse. In most cases that's not a good combination. I think it's great that you would like to put him in training with a BNT but I also think you should look for a good trainer for yourself and take lessons on quiet well schooled horses in order to better your riding. This way you'll be a more competent rider and will be better able to ride him when he is more trained. You'll have a much better chance of being able to ride him when he's done with training and hopefully you two will be able to develop a good partnership.


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  12. #12
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    Dec. 5, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by plainbay22 View Post
    He looks like a good guy but as you say you are an advanced beginner and you own a green sensitive horse. In most cases that's not a good combination. I think it's great that you would like to put him in training with a BNT but I also think you should look for a good trainer for yourself and take lessons on quiet well schooled horses in order to better your riding. This way you'll be a more competent rider and will be better able to ride him when he is more trained. You'll have a much better chance of being able to ride him when he's done with training and hopefully you two will be able to develop a good partnership.
    Thank you for the advice! I am currently looking for a new trainer and want to get back into regular lessons. In case you missed it, the woman in the video is not me. Newman and I make a surprisingly nice pair, and I fell in love with him after riding some quiet schooling horses for several months. Apparently I have very quiet hands and cueing, and I think we make a nice fit personally. But I couldn't agree more; we both need training. A lot of it.



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by lferguson View Post
    He has *ahem* Thoroughbred feet, and my farrier wants to shoe him in the spring, so perhaps the rough footing in the arena (which was obviously still under construction and let in rain) was hurting his feet. I've had several people look at his tack, and it does fit properly.

    Thank you all so much for the feedback! I'd appreciate any more comments anyone else has.
    Ahh, could well be his feet then. A good chiropractor begins by looking at a horse's feet because if the base isn't good he is then set up for all kinds of problems above his feet. But don't become so hyperfocused on his feet that you miss something else. I'm just guessing and your best bet is to explore it with your vet.

    He looks like a good guy. Good luck with your lessons and good luck with him.



  14. #14
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    Dec. 5, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by SEPowell View Post
    Ahh, could well be his feet then. A good chiropractor begins by looking at a horse's feet because if the base isn't good he is then set up for all kinds of problems above his feet. But don't become so hyperfocused on his feet that you miss something else. I'm just guessing and your best bet is to explore it with your vet.

    He looks like a good guy. Good luck with your lessons and good luck with him.
    I will be having the vet out soon thanks to all the helpful observations from more experienced eyes. Thank you!



  15. #15
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    May. 17, 2010
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    He looks very quiet and sweet, which makes me lean toward keeping him. However, you are both very green, not a good combo. So I think if you are willing to be VERY patient and slow, it might work. It can never hurt to put a green bean in with an accomplished trainer and Eric Dierks seems good.



  16. #16
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    Oct. 22, 2001
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    Rather than take advice from us, might not be a bad idea to take the horse with you to someone you might want to work with and get a few lessons to assess. It may be that he's not the right horse for you; it may be that he will make up into something quite safe/sensible/lovely - but it's fairly hard to tell from those videos (though I would say that I didn't see any obvious dealbreakers in them). Either way, in your shoes, I'd want to see if I could find a solid program to put him, perhaps with a few professional rides every week in addition to lessons (if that's in your budget). But it's really going to be a process - no instant fix here! Depending on where you are located, there's probably a few folks here who could offer suggestions. While I like Eric, I'm not sure he is who I would pick for a fairly green horse/rider combination in that type of program.


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  17. #17
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    Nov. 12, 2001
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    Dry Ridge, KY USA
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    Eric will do well with training your horse and you. You should sign up for lessons with him, too. You are lucky that he is in your area to help you. Occasionally, he will come to Lexington, KY and give lessons. Whenever he gets over here, I try to ride with him.

    I agree about your boy being a bit tight through his back and shoulders. If he is barefoot, then perhaps his feet are a bit ouchy? I am happy that you are getting the Vet out to check him out.

    Are you feeding him a biotin, amino acid hoof suppliment? Farrier's Formula and HB 15 are very good for TB feet.

    Good luck with your boy!
    When in Doubt, let your horse do the Thinking!



  18. #18
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    Dec. 5, 2012
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    Thanks for your input, GoSpots! I'm looking at local trainers and am hoping to do just as you suggest as soon as I find someone suitable.

    Quote Originally Posted by Auburn View Post
    Eric will do well with training your horse and you. You should sign up for lessons with him, too. You are lucky that he is in your area to help you. Occasionally, he will come to Lexington, KY and give lessons. Whenever he gets over here, I try to ride with him.

    I agree about your boy being a bit tight through his back and shoulders. If he is barefoot, then perhaps his feet are a bit ouchy? I am happy that you are getting the Vet out to check him out.

    Are you feeding him a biotin, amino acid hoof suppliment? Farrier's Formula and HB 15 are very good for TB feet.

    Good luck with your boy!
    He's actually not in my area. I would have to ship him from here in Indiana. I'm continuing to look at closer trainers and am hoping to visit a few within the next couple weeks. I'll be moving to Georgia in May, which would be a great time to spend some time at Renovatio Farm with it much closer.

    I'm glad you mentioned a hoof supplement! I have been looking at Farrier's Formula but wasn't sure what would be a good choice. Thanks for the recommendations!



  19. #19
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    Feb. 4, 2004
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    He's cute. Agree with others that in the video he is not moving very forward, sort of mintzing along, less balanced at the canter, but seems very steady/reasonable. Getting along well as a pair is the most important thing, so if you do that is good reason to keep him at least for a bit and see how it goes.

    I'm not sure if I understand the question about "money well invested" though. If you mean a good horse to take lessons/pursue eventing on, it sounds like you already have your answer because you enjoy him so much. More training will make any horse more enjoyable and valuable.

    But if you mean turn a profit, IME very few event horses will in a professional program (as in, if it cost you 10K to have him in a professional program for 6 months, he might not gain 10K in value). Not a knock on any horse/trainer, just the economics of it. Professional programs are $$ and most horses don't appreciate that quickly.

    My OTTB with poor feet does well on Biotin Plus. I also treat for white line disease in the spring, as he is susceptible to crumbly feet.



  20. #20
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    Aug. 4, 2009
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    MD
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    You do know your video has been removed???

    You have of course made sure of ALL the costs involved before sending a horse off to be professionally for training. You may not get your investment back or equal to, so evaluate the horse and seriously think about how you want to spend your money and what you plan to gain.

    Locally boarding where you can take a few lessons on your horse and have the trainer do a few scheduled rides while you watch weekly may benefit both you and your horse together as a team....

    'll be moving to Georgia in May
    Julie Richards is in Neuman GA..which might work for you...



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