The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 345
Results 81 to 99 of 99
  1. #81
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2008
    Posts
    4,554

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Big_Grey_hunter View Post
    Calambar is consistently posts uneducated, rude, close minded, bull-headed responses to pretty much every topic. Nothing anyone on this board says will change that.
    yep, and that's why I never answer him/her.



  2. #82
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 1999
    Location
    Harrisburg, PA USA
    Posts
    6,541

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by spotteddrafter View Post
    Completely and totally agree. My dogs (golden retriever, goldendoodle) are incredibly affectionate - and they often initiate it! Hugs, kisses, full-body lean-ins, snuggles in bed, trying to sit in my lap when it's tv time (super fun when both dogs each weigh 70# and believe they should both be on my lap), etc. I didn't train them to be this way, they just ARE.
    Which is why one should never extrapolate limited personal experience to broad generalizations. ;-)

    Golden retrievers and goldendoodles craving snuggle time? Don't think that would surprise anyone. Scent hounds, either (most scent hounds have been bred for hundreds of years to live/hunt in pack i.e., close quarters with others, conditions).

    Other breeds aren't that way.

    LOL, I had my brother's 2 Golden Retrievers live with us for 9 months once when they moved across country and were having a new house built. The 2 sweetest dogs in the world, but they drove my daughter nuts with their never-ending quest when they, as Big_grey_hunter said, "followed you around begging to get hugged, held, rubbed, and scritched." Her own dog? A Shetland Sheepdog. Utterly charming and affectionate, but cloying and clinging? Never. Different strokes for different folks.

    I have a couple German Shepherd Dogs now who although they will tolerate smooches and one often actively seeks them out from me, I wouldn't recommend anyone to get in their faces. Ever. As I've said, they know that as dogs they MUST tolerate idiot humans, but you can see they hate it and I protect them from that human behavior as much as possible.

    I think it's safe to generalize that dogs don't like people getting in their faces or petting them in front of their eyes. Or hugging. Of course many have learned to not only tolerate it, but to like it.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #83
    Join Date
    Jul. 13, 2008
    Posts
    2,898

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Big_Grey_hunter View Post
    Calambar is consistently posts uneducated, rude, close minded, bull-headed responses to pretty much every topic. Nothing anyone on this board says will change that.
    I'm not talking about winning over Calamber. Anyone reading that exchange - full of malicious humor, directed at an outnumbered opponent and aimed to wound through unanswerable mockery - would either titter along or wonder if any cause that has jetsmom and cowboymom as proponents might be flawed.



  4. #84
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2006
    Location
    Seabeck - the soggy peninsula
    Posts
    3,759

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cowboymom View Post
    That's an ACD! In my circles they're called "truck dogs" b/c they will guard your truck for you with their lives! They are tough.

    Calamber, I guess that gives you a lot of reading to catch up on!
    Actually, it just reinforces how widespread the lunacy is but that should not really surprise anyone, given how longwinded the discussions get over the reasoning powers of dogs. Thanks for the list of loons though, birds of a feather and all of that.
    "When written in Chinese, the word "crisis" is composed of two characters, one represents danger, the other represents opportunity."

    John F Kennedy



  5. #85
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2006
    Location
    Seabeck - the soggy peninsula
    Posts
    3,759

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by D_BaldStockings View Post
    So was your dog totally unsocialized, and abused (as you claim an 'unloving' dog must be) or just a normal terrier who didn't like you being pushy so he yelped and snapped at you?

    And what would you have done if your correction had elicited a second, more serious bite?
    Put the dog to sleep/death?

    Not saying you were wrong in your response as it did work, but disparaging safe, proven methods or desensitizing or other behavior altering training that is less likely to result in blood and tears seems unwise.

    As far as new age, I've been around for well over a half century and rehabbing biting dogs have been a trainers problem since long before my time.

    Each dog is an individual and what works for one may be inappropriate and ineffective or counter-productive with another.
    Read the whole thought, he was an intact male, he was asserting his dominance as they do sometimes, contrary to all of the great theorists who themselves make quite a bit of hay creating all kinds of bizarre new theories. Perhaps you may want to read it again. No, actually if the dog were to bite after a correction I would dedicate my whole life, and the total resources of the bank including and up to selling my house, just to prove how much I wuved my widdle misunderstood puppy, if we had to end up living on the street, well that is just great because I proved what any unbalanced human being does these days, sacrifice all as the country literally goes to the dogs. And then that long list of experts would have so many more resources to use. Great business plan right?!
    "When written in Chinese, the word "crisis" is composed of two characters, one represents danger, the other represents opportunity."

    John F Kennedy



  6. #86
    Join Date
    Aug. 5, 2007
    Posts
    1,146

    Default

    I am only seeing Calamber attempt to assert dominance over the thread topic.

    If you would prefer to get bitten so you can enjoy 'dominating' your dog no one will stop you. I just don't understand why you think it is training.


    It isn't a debate class, only a discussion in response to a problem the owner has.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  7. #87
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
    Posts
    13,232

    Default

    Why do I keep thinking "Extinction Burst"?


    2 members found this post helpful.

  8. #88
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 2001
    Posts
    1,006

    Default

    jetsmom,

    Awesome. Click treat for you!



  9. #89
    Join Date
    Jul. 22, 2008
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    2,035

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vacation1 View Post
    I'm not talking about winning over Calamber. Anyone reading that exchange - full of malicious humor, directed at an outnumbered opponent and aimed to wound through unanswerable mockery - would either titter along or wonder if any cause that has jetsmom and cowboymom as proponents might be flawed.
    I understand what you're saying here, but a small period of time cohabiting with Calamber & jetsmom/cowboymom on this board would make it abundantly clear who the more reasonable parties were, as would a cursory examination of posting history.

    The links that jetsmom posted are extremely useful. Dominance theory does a tremendous disservice to dogs; the complex social structure of wild wolves and feral dogs doesn't even line up with that outdated methodology. Don't tell Calamber that though. It's alllllll a big hippie conspiracy.
    bar.ka think u al.l. susp.ect
    free bar.ka and tidy rabbit


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #90
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2006
    Location
    Seabeck - the soggy peninsula
    Posts
    3,759

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rubyfree View Post
    I understand what you're saying here, but a small period of time cohabiting with Calamber & jetsmom/cowboymom on this board would make it abundantly clear who the more reasonable parties were, as would a cursory examination of posting history.

    The links that jetsmom posted are extremely useful. Dominance theory does a tremendous disservice to dogs; the complex social structure of wild wolves and feral dogs doesn't even line up with that outdated methodology. Don't tell Calamber that though. It's alllllll a big hippie conspiracy.
    It is, after all, a New Age, where human beings are just so called "evolved" cave people, not so terribly surprising that there are those who are admired that think the dog is either a wolf or feral dog society. I don't think the hippies had much of any idea about anything that was not handed to them by the partisans of the Tavistock Institute, or the pipe dreams of their "peace" pipes. This is really the new normal of the virtual reality generations, and SURPRISE, is where the new age spirituality comes from, it is not really new, in fact it is as old as the Roman Empire, and older. Animism comes to mind. Since I have no accepted definitive scientific texts for those who hang on their every word, I will have to bid adieu to the pack mentality, those who are different most assuredly are strangers to be whipped into line or out of the pack. If you want to read about that, check out "The Lonely Crowd". Interesting mind benders, one of the grandfathers of the New Age psychology/psychos.
    "When written in Chinese, the word "crisis" is composed of two characters, one represents danger, the other represents opportunity."

    John F Kennedy



  11. #91
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2008
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    1,601

    Default

    I'm a little late to this thread, but I wanted to join in because I do a lot of volunteer work and fostering for a local greyhound adoption group and really love them.

    I will say that MOST of them are not snappy or growly about touching and affection, even around their face, despite their upbringing on the track. I consider MOST of them to be way easier, fresh off the track, than almost any other breed out there.

    However, for people that have never worked with greyhounds straight off the track, they do deserve a bit more leeway about their behaviors at first. They are generally really great companions, but the first few months can seem strange for people that are used to more "typical" breeds like retrievers and shepherds. They have spent their entire lives up to that point with other greyhounds, and their human interaction has usually been very much a business relationship. And I don't believe that most of them these days are mistreated, they just don't grow up like most dogs do. They are like adult puppies when you get them as far as knowledge of home and human life goes except with certain ingrained adult behaviors.

    Other dogs grow up as puppies in human homes. Greyhounds grow up on farms with other greyhounds and then go to training with other greyhounds and then go to the track with other greyhounds. They are used to ALWAYS having their own space once in a kennel environment and always having other dogs near (but in separate kennels) - they have NEVER had to share bed space or had any dog or human near their food. This creates some unique tendencies. This also means a lot of their body language is VERY subtle - they've only really ever needed to communicate them to other dogs, who are way more observant than humans. Plus, sighthounds as a group have always been bred to be fairly aloof and independent becuase of how they worked with humans.

    Our greyhound has lived with us for over 2 years now and has been off the track for 3, and she still has a mild "sleep startle." She is in no way vicious about it, and we work on it, so it's pretty mild these days. She lets us hug her (she comes and buries her head in my armpit so she can get ear rubs) and allows anyone in her face and quite likes children (just try and pull her away if there are little kids adoring her), but when she's asleep, you have to be careful - I let her sleep with me sometimes, but we would never snuggle with her face by mine (she's not much of a snuggler anyway). These days, she'll sometimes wake up and grumble, but that's pretty much it unless one of the cats has decided to launch off of her during sleep or something. This isn't that uncommon with greys (though it's not something most of them have by any means) because they never got conditioned to be okay with getting jostled around during sleep in a home as younger dogs.

    It's likely the OP's dog really loves the affection but just hasn't gotten used to people in his space yet, despite enjoying it, and maybe gets spooked when he realizes there's a human RIGHT THERE by his face even though he's put himself right by that human's face. Seems weird, but they really are getting used to a completely alien life. A lot of them are total love bugs but haven't quite figured out how all that attention works.

    Despite all of this, these dogs usually adapt beautifully and become better citizens than many dogs raised in human homes. I foster all the time, and I could have 3 at once no sweat because they are just so easy. They can have quirks, but most people who adopt a greyhound know this by the time of adoption if the adoption group is any good.

    For the OP: as mentioned, greytalk is a great resource - a LOT of knowledgeable members on there. Also, if your adoption group is anything like ours, there should be several knowledgeable people within the group willing to talk you through this. If you haven't contacted them about this, you absolutely should because they would want to know and can help you work through the issue. Plus they should know just in case the dog ever has to be returned to them. Within our group, we are always always willing to take a dog back and find a better match.

    I would guess this is a behavior that will get better with time, but if you ever decide you can't live with it, your adoption group (or another greyhound group) would likely take the dog on no problem - I know ours would.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  12. #92
    Join Date
    Feb. 15, 2007
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    777

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Anne FS View Post
    Which is why one should never extrapolate limited personal experience to broad generalizations. ;-)
    Oh, I agree completely!

    I was just responding to the poster who said that all dogs (their generalization, not mine) do not like to be hugged, or otherwise accept similar physical affection. I just mentioned that I personally have owned 3 different kinds of dogs and all 3 of them were/are extremely physically affectionate. I also have friends who have various breeds and cross breeds of dogs. The vast majority of them initiate physical affection, however I have personally also been around dogs who will not tolerate it. But, such a blanket statement of "most dogs do not like physical affection" is just ridiculous.
    “Riding a horse is not a gentle hobby, to be picked up and laid down like a game of Solitaire. It is a grand passion.” ~Emerson



  13. #93
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2002
    Location
    Fairfax, VA USA
    Posts
    5,719

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bort84 View Post
    I'm a little late to this thread, but I wanted to join in because I do a lot of volunteer work and fostering for a local greyhound adoption group and really love them.

    I will say that MOST of them are not snappy or growly about touching and affection, even around their face, despite their upbringing on the track. I consider MOST of them to be way easier, fresh off the track, than almost any other breed out there.

    However, for people that have never worked with greyhounds straight off the track, they do deserve a bit more leeway about their behaviors at first. They are generally really great companions, but the first few months can seem strange for people that are used to more "typical" breeds like retrievers and shepherds. They have spent their entire lives up to that point with other greyhounds, and their human interaction has usually been very much a business relationship. And I don't believe that most of them these days are mistreated, they just don't grow up like most dogs do. They are like adult puppies when you get them as far as knowledge of home and human life goes except with certain ingrained adult behaviors.

    Other dogs grow up as puppies in human homes. Greyhounds grow up on farms with other greyhounds and then go to training with other greyhounds and then go to the track with other greyhounds. They are used to ALWAYS having their own space once in a kennel environment and always having other dogs near (but in separate kennels) - they have NEVER had to share bed space or had any dog or human near their food. This creates some unique tendencies. This also means a lot of their body language is VERY subtle - they've only really ever needed to communicate them to other dogs, who are way more observant than humans. Plus, sighthounds as a group have always been bred to be fairly aloof and independent becuase of how they worked with humans.

    Our greyhound has lived with us for over 2 years now and has been off the track for 3, and she still has a mild "sleep startle." She is in no way vicious about it, and we work on it, so it's pretty mild these days. She lets us hug her (she comes and buries her head in my armpit so she can get ear rubs) and allows anyone in her face and quite likes children (just try and pull her away if there are little kids adoring her), but when she's asleep, you have to be careful - I let her sleep with me sometimes, but we would never snuggle with her face by mine (she's not much of a snuggler anyway). These days, she'll sometimes wake up and grumble, but that's pretty much it unless one of the cats has decided to launch off of her during sleep or something. This isn't that uncommon with greys (though it's not something most of them have by any means) because they never got conditioned to be okay with getting jostled around during sleep in a home as younger dogs.

    It's likely the OP's dog really loves the affection but just hasn't gotten used to people in his space yet, despite enjoying it, and maybe gets spooked when he realizes there's a human RIGHT THERE by his face even though he's put himself right by that human's face. Seems weird, but they really are getting used to a completely alien life. A lot of them are total love bugs but haven't quite figured out how all that attention works.

    Despite all of this, these dogs usually adapt beautifully and become better citizens than many dogs raised in human homes. I foster all the time, and I could have 3 at once no sweat because they are just so easy. They can have quirks, but most people who adopt a greyhound know this by the time of adoption if the adoption group is any good.

    For the OP: as mentioned, greytalk is a great resource - a LOT of knowledgeable members on there. Also, if your adoption group is anything like ours, there should be several knowledgeable people within the group willing to talk you through this. If you haven't contacted them about this, you absolutely should because they would want to know and can help you work through the issue. Plus they should know just in case the dog ever has to be returned to them. Within our group, we are always always willing to take a dog back and find a better match.

    I would guess this is a behavior that will get better with time, but if you ever decide you can't live with it, your adoption group (or another greyhound group) would likely take the dog on no problem - I know ours would.
    What a helpful (and thoughtful) response!
    "Hope is a good thing, maybe the best of things, and no good thing ever dies."

    "It's supposed to be hard...the hard is what makes it great!" (Jimmy Dugan, "A League of Their Own")


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #94
    Join Date
    Feb. 11, 2013
    Posts
    52

    Default

    I wasn't about to wade into the dominance discussion but I have been reading along and enjoying these responses. Thanks to those who suggested greytalk forums - great resource. Also, the Hound's former foster person is a friend and has been very helpful.

    Thanks especially to Bort84. Your description of OTTG quirks is very accurate and I think your interpretation is pretty much right on. Even though Hound appeared to be tolerating close proximity it was like he suddenly realized: Whoa! Too close! and freaked out. We've been working in everyday ways to desensitize him to various stimuli. It's going well. The thought of returning this dog never crossed our minds. He's so easy to live with it's ridiculous; aside from those two incidents he's honestly never done anything bad. He's extremely gentle and affectionate and likes to sleep about 80% of the time.

    He's a funny fellow though, & the ways he's different from other dogs are pretty interesting. I agree, like most OTTG he came off the track having had no intimate dealings with human beings and no idea of the pidgin 'language' that dogs raised in a house pick up very early on, which allows them to communicate with people. He's picking this up quickly, but it's a lot to learn.

    He sometimes reminds me of a spooky horse. Shiny objects are alarming - once he shot across the room when the sun glanced off my wristwatch. We recently went for a walk on a windy day and a paper plate went flying through the air, which was a Big Deal. Just yesterday he jumped straight up in the air like a pogo stick when the book I was reading made what he thought was a weird noise when I turned the page. Once you invite him to investigate these new experiences he will bravely approach and sniff, so he is getting a little more adjusted every day. But yeah, Life-with-People-In-A-House is still full of surprises.

    Bort, You mentioned that your greyhounds coexist comfortably with your cats. Any tips about how to integrate the two? This Hound does not presently live with my 5 cats, but BF and I will be moving them all to live together in a new place this summer. My primary concern is the safety of my cats, so I want to proceed with caution. If Hound was not a promising candidate I wouldn't be trying this. He has been tested as 'cat tolerant' and was previously fostered at a home with a cat. He's met my cats several times under controlled conditions, which seemed to go well - everyone was nervous, but mutually respectful. I have been thinking about how to make this introduction go as smoothly as possible.



  15. #95
    Join Date
    Feb. 10, 2006
    Location
    Middle of Nowhere, take a right, FL
    Posts
    4,443

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by threedogpack View Post
    step one, don't get in his face. If he's an off the track dog, remember they wear muzzles for a reason.

    training: stay off his face. Most dogs don't like it anyway, they just tolerate it. Leaning or bending over is also a big no no for most dogs.
    They wear muzzles for several reasons but not because they are known for biting people.

    The muzzle is a guide for photo finishes.

    In Australia it is (was?) the law for all greyhounds to wear muzzles in public which is ridiculous and may be a holdover from the days when many racing people encouraged people to think of greyhounds as mysterious and ferocious creatures. They often discouraged adoptions because they feared (rightly) that once people got to see them (as one said, on every street corner) they would not find them so exotic and even worse, they would start to get upset about some of the ways dogs were treated and killed. Which they have and that isn't counting the numerous large scale cruelty cases of massive starvations or shootings. Most people do not realize how heavily they are culled from birth through out their careers. But that is getting way off topic.

    Greys wear their muzzles any time they are around other dogs. For one thing they have paper thin skin, no fat and their muscles are THISCLOSE to the surface. For another thing they are dogs and act like dogs, they jump and scratch and nip and bite and fight just like other dogs (almost all are also entire). In races some dogs will bite to try and keep a dog from passing them.

    I would definitely work with this dog for awhile, he hasn't been off the track very long and he isn't well socialized. But I'd be wary of getting anywhere near his face not that I would WANT to get near my dogs' faces. I've never understood that and I HATE being licked. (really, they just like the salty taste) So I can't say I'd blame a dog for not wanting to have anyone near their face but they do need to learn to refrain from growling and biting, like it or not.
    Every mighty oak was once a nut that stood its ground.

    Proud Closet Canterer! Member Riders with Fibromyalgia clique.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #96
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2008
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    464

    Default

    I also fostered greyhounds for a rescue, so I can add a few more comments.

    Foster parents not only get started on house training, but they try to expose the greyhounds to many different things. For us, this included tile floors, stairs, pools, and cactus. We also tested their response to small animals such as cats and small dogs, and simulated child behaviors to see how well suited the dogs might be to homes with other pets and kids. I recall observing the growl-snap response to in-your-face* several times. As bort84 noted, most don't do it, but some do. These dogs were not recommended for adoption to homes with kids.

    *Note - this situation was simulated while the dog was muzzled. A muzzle might be a good thing to own if, for example, guests unexpectedly arrive with children in tow.

    Another thing to consider is that although most dogs are bred as companions, racing greyhounds are bred for two main traits: prey drive and speed. They are not bred for temperament, intelligence or looks. Thus, these traits are highly variable within the population - greys come in every color and coat pattern, and they range from super smart to dumb as rocks. Racing greyhounds today (in the US) are hundreds of generations removed from their ancestors who both hunted and lived as companions to people. Despite this, most greys are sweet and willing to please.

    Regarding introducing your grey to cats, he was either tested for his response with an "expert cat" or fostered with one. Living with a cat is different from testing with a cat. I always introduced the cats to the foster dog one at a time. I started with the most bad-ass of the cats. This is the cat that won't flee at the sight of the dog (the last thing you want your cat to do is run). A bad-ass cat will stand his ground and throw a fit - hiss, spit, make himself huge. In the first introduction (supervised by one person to handle the cat and one to handle the dog) we allowed the muzzled dog to approach the cat. The dog was usually curious and wanted to sniff. The cat would respond by growling, hissing, and if provoked further, swatting at the dog. Generally, the dog would yelp, leap backwards, and run away from the cat. We would repeat this several times until the dog learned not to approach the cat (this is where you learn your grey's position on the intelligence spectrum) and the dog would be praised profusely for being good around and ignoring the cat. Then, we would slowly introduce the other cats, reinforcing good behavior with bad-ass cat* as needed. Any time the dog was loose with the cats for the first few weeks, he or she wore a muzzle. If your cats are indoor-outdoor, plan to have your dog in a muzzle when loose in the yard. Outdoor cats often invoke a different response.

    *Note - we sometimes had to restrain our bad-ass cat. Over time he learned the drill and would just try to head the whole thing off by marching straight up to the new grey and swatting. You want your grey to learn that cats should be respected, but they should also be comfortable entering a room with a cat in it. Don't be alarmed if you find yourself having to rein in an over-zealous cat.



  17. #97
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2008
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    1,601

    Default

    Completely agree with smm20 on starting a grey with cats. My older male cat is the alpha of our pack. He will stand his ground with any dog and is a great intro for non cat savvy dogs. So start with your most brave kitty for the first "nose to nose" intro (always on a lead and muzzled).

    With new fosters, I always keep them on lead and tethered to me around the kitties until I feel pretty confident of their reactions. Then they might be allowed in a small space (living room) muzzled and usually with a lead on their collar so I can grab it quick if needed. If they mostly ignore the cats, then they stay muzzled but can be leash free.

    Set up your furniture so the cats can super quick run behind a couch and out of the room. Baby gate areas (baby gates far enough off the ground the cats can sneak under) so you can always keep an eye on things and the cats can escape. The cats should always have a safe room nearby to escape to (we do this with a baby gate they can slip under to our guest room).

    Just don't trust the new grey for a couple of weeks, even if he seems okay. Crate or separate securely when you can't be there and err on the side of caution. Another good idea: use the poop guard in the muzzle (it's a solid piece of plastic that fits in the front of the muzzle: prevents poo eating AND keeps little cat appendages from getting through the spaces in the muzzle.

    Also, as mentioned previously, praise profusely for ignoring the cats, and NEVER allow any kitty chasing, ever. Don't ever let them outside together (an indoor feline friend suddenly looks like a tasty morsel running free in a big yard). If you end up with a really tough case (not that common if they've been tested), you should ask your adoption group or a qualified behaviorist for more advanced help.

    Despite these warnings, you will likely know very quick whether yours will be an easy cat case or not. Most of my fosters that test cat safe are easily trained to be super cat safe. However, you do get one once in awhile that is fine in the office with an aloof cat and then really wants to eat cats in a home setting. Again, be in close contact with your adoption group (if they are any good at all - most greyhound groups are) and they can help you immensely if needed = )



  18. #98
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2008
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    1,601

    Default

    Also wanted to follow up summerhorse's muzzle comments. The track muzzles are used to gauge order of finish, as she said. They are also used because, like horses, very competitive greys can get somewhat aggressive (nips, bites) while racing. They don't have jockeys on their backs to prevent nipping and such. But it's not like they have some innate desire to maul one another. On the contrary, because of life on the track, this breed has been bred to be overall very quiet and laid back about other dogs and their environment. Otherwise how would they endure track life? They get turned out together on the track, grow up together on the farm, and must race together without causing a dog fight. They also must be content to sleep all day in kennels between turnout sessions. When greys have issues with other dogs, it's often because they've only other been around other greys for their ENTIRE lives and don't always recognize other breeds as similar to themselves (dogs).

    There are the separate turnout "basket" muzzles that are used when all the greys get turned out for exercise. It's not because this breed is more aggressive or prone to nipping, it's because they have the absolute thinnest skin and coat of any dog you'll ever meet. Holy cow. If you've never owned a greyhound, you have no idea how nerve wracking it can be. Their skin can rip like paper. A snag that could send a greyhound to the e-vet might not even draw blood on a lab. Not an exaggeration. I will say some greys can get that competitive drive during turnout play, and with their thin skin, a normally harmless nip can rip that skin badly. But they definitely DON'T wear muzzles because they are snarling snappy biting beasts.

    I have to say, as a greyhound owner and active fosterer, I LOVE that this breed is so used to muzzles from a young age. It makes introductions with other greys (also muzzled usually) SO much safer. Imagine if every breed was so used to muzzles? Maybe there wouldn't be such a stigma about using them and training your dog to respond APPROPRIATELY to them. Think of the drama and stress saved. I honestly wish every dog owner started their pup from a young age learning about a properly fitted muzzle. It's a great tool to have when needed, even if you only need it once in a blue moon. When I bring home fosters, I pop a muzzle on the new dog and a muzzle on my grey (which causes zero stress on either side because they are trained to happily accept them). This reduces owner AND dog stress during intros. What a nice tool.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #99
    Join Date
    Feb. 10, 2006
    Location
    Middle of Nowhere, take a right, FL
    Posts
    4,443

    Default

    One of mine was racing around the yard and got too close to some kind of palm and it ripped a huge L in his side. It was about 4" one way and then 4-5" back the other way. The vet used up his entire supply of local anesthetic stiching him up. (Greys are also Thoroughbred sensitive to the 10th power!) He didn't want to put him under just for that (since they sometimes die from anesthetic).

    They are wonderful dogs though, just take a bit more time in the beginning.
    Every mighty oak was once a nut that stood its ground.

    Proud Closet Canterer! Member Riders with Fibromyalgia clique.



Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 130
    Last Post: Jan. 19, 2012, 06:55 PM
  2. Replies: 9
    Last Post: Nov. 26, 2010, 09:45 AM
  3. abscesses on face after getting teeth done???
    By alterationstation in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: Nov. 23, 2009, 05:30 PM
  4. Replies: 25
    Last Post: Apr. 12, 2009, 01:11 AM
  5. Personal Space/Weanling Colt?
    By Samotis in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: Jul. 16, 2008, 04:51 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •