The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 12 of 14 FirstFirst ... 21011121314 LastLast
Results 221 to 240 of 267
  1. #221
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2008
    Location
    Delaware Valley
    Posts
    1,825

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kate66 View Post
    Interesting observation, but I actually still think I am right. From Oxford dictionary online........"There is a distinction in meaning between infer and imply."
    There is a critical distinction, but the other poster is right. While the words can certainly describe the same event, the speaker/writer implies, and the listener/reader infers. Think of it as giving versus receiving. You can't "infer" something by "writing" it.

    Affect and effect are often mixed up as well, often by educated people.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #222
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    4,737

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dewey View Post
    That's fascinating, Sophie! I never would have guessed that "mushroom" has a French origin.
    What surprise, they are the same people who decided escargot was a great appetizer



  3. #223
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    12,976

    Default

    I am frequently amused by the thought that someone having an higher education means they have to know every grammar rule. Maybe they can do advanced mathematical equations that others would not even dream existed. Being smart about something does not mean you automatically are smart about everything.

    Not saying errors are OK on professional documents, just saying the comments about 'and they have a masters' some how makes it shocking that they do not know the nuances of the language. If their masters was in English then sure, it would just be wrong. Knowing enough to easily communicate does not equal dissecting the oddities of our language.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #224
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2002
    Posts
    3,987

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by clanter View Post
    What surprise, they are the same people who decided escargot was a great appetizer
    Ah yes, the old, same old stereotype. What I never understood is that some people think cooked snails are disgusting, but raw oysters are just fine?

    lol
    Ottbs - The finish line is only the beginning!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #225
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2004
    Location
    Rolling hills of Virginny
    Posts
    5,976

    Default

    Not French, but I think snails in garlic butter are divine, and hate raw oysters. I call 'em snot on the half-shell. Puke!
    The plural of anecdote is not data.



  6. #226
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2002
    Location
    Boogerville, USA
    Posts
    858

    Red face Just to keep this "horse-related" ...

    One that I've not seen mentioned is when someone writes:
    "My horse is colicing!!" or "My *pone coliced!!" The verb form of colic is colicking/colicked.
    Would you go picnicing? No: "One time my friend and I picniced at that lake." No. You picnicked at that lake. Verb form of picnic is picnicking/picnicked.


    *When grown people "baby-talk spell" ~ pone for pony, or worse donk, for donkey. Pone is cornbread. Donk is not a word. Please lose the cutsey; it's gagging me.



  7. #227
    Join Date
    Apr. 15, 2003
    Location
    Northeast MA
    Posts
    4,074

    Default

    Many great points being discussed herein. May I add a random comment or two?

    Mr. Frugal uses a line when discussing charitable works with certain boards: "Doing well by doing good". Discuss.

    Many years ago, long before the internet took over our world, Yankee magazine had an article about regionalisms. Part of it was a quiz that would list regional names for various things. We've mentioned soda/ tonic/ pop/ coke, but what do you call the thing you carry water in? Is a pail or a bucket? There were perhaps 20 items, as I recall. But the answer key could identify your place of upbringing to within 100 miles. It would be fun to see if that has been updated and if the specificity of regionalisms has changed.

    And lest I forget, "piss ant" might also be derived from the Elizabethan English "pismire": aka ants, whose nests were considered to smell like urine back then and later called piss ants. If so, returning G.I.s picked the term up from the British troops rather than the French.
    They don't call me frugal for nothing.
    Proud and achy member of the Eventing Grannies clique.



  8. #228
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2011
    Location
    southeast Georgia
    Posts
    3,374

    Default

    An article that may be of interest to readers of this thread:

    http://www.thedailybeast.com/newswee...n-t-worry.html
    I heard a neigh. Oh, such a brisk and melodious neigh as that was! My very heart leaped with delight at the sound. --Nathaniel Hawthorne


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #229
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    10,957

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by arabhorse2 View Post
    Lunge is fine to use. Lounge however, is not. They don't mean the same things.
    Sadly some horse do attempt to lounge on the longe.

    Then too there are those who attempt to lunge while being longed.
    Last edited by merrygoround; Feb. 28, 2013 at 05:04 PM.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #230
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2008
    Location
    Delaware Valley
    Posts
    1,825

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dewey View Post
    An article that may be of interest to readers of this thread:

    http://www.thedailybeast.com/newswee...n-t-worry.html
    Love it. From the article:

    My message to these people, delivered from the lofty heights of my newly acquired mavenhood, is this: stop beating up on yourselves. It's only a grammatical error, not a drive-by shooting. Words are wonderful, but they're not sacred. And between you and I (aha!), nobody's perfect.
    I have a confession. I pretty much write for a living. Everything I write - whether legal briefs or articles - is edited. Sometimes heavily. Out of hundreds of things I've written, I can count on one hand the ones that didn't come back with corrections. It's okay. I didn't kill anyone or break any laws or even get myself fired.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  11. #231
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2005
    Location
    Sandy, Utah
    Posts
    6,490

    Default

    Hey. I happen to very much enjoy consuming escargots. And I will add, so does my Jack Russell Terror who wanders the yard searching endlessly under the vinca for crunchy treats (yes he eats the shells too). BTW it is the same snail but I don't harvest my own for cooking!



  12. #232
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2004
    Location
    ILLINOIS :)
    Posts
    1,422

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
    http://imglol.com/media/a/a2/a2t/a2t2k-no-lunging.jpg

    In this context:
    "I tried to go and help them!"

    instead of:
    "I tried to go to help them!"

    The first sentence doesn't make any sense. I tried to go. I tried to help them. They're not seperates that need a conjunction: I tried to go TO help them.
    Actually, either usage may be correct:

    "I tried to go and help them!"--The person is saying that he/she made the effort to both leave AND help. In essence, "I tried to go and tried to help them!"

    "I tried to go to help them!"--The person is saying that he/she tried to leave TO help.

    However, I do agree that most people probably mean the first statement and say the second one instead.

    Oh, BTW to everyone: The word is "English," not "english."
    "And now . . .off to violin-land, where all is sweetness and delicacy and harmony and there are no red-headed clients to vex us with their conundrums."


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #233
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2004
    Location
    ILLINOIS :)
    Posts
    1,422

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dewey View Post
    I see your point, but "well" can also mean "right or proper," and I believe that in this sense "well wishes" is grammatical. We can agree to disagree, however. My copy of Fowler is in my office--will check it tomorrow to see if he weighs in on this.
    Of course, then there is that camp that would argue that "well" can also be considered a noun (a state of being, in this case a good one), which would change all the labels again. . . .
    "And now . . .off to violin-land, where all is sweetness and delicacy and harmony and there are no red-headed clients to vex us with their conundrums."



  14. #234
    Join Date
    Sep. 4, 2012
    Location
    Southeast US
    Posts
    1,537

    Default

    Of course "well" is a noun. I get my water from one.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  15. #235
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2011
    Location
    On a horse.
    Posts
    395

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NoSuchPerson View Post
    Of course "well" is a noun. I get my water from one.
    lol! And in that case a well wish would be one followed by a tossed penny! I've always wanted a wishing well


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #236
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2004
    Location
    ILLINOIS :)
    Posts
    1,422

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DancingFoalFarms View Post
    lol! And in that case a well wish would be one followed by a tossed penny! I've always wanted a wishing well
    Or is that a well-wish?
    "And now . . .off to violin-land, where all is sweetness and delicacy and harmony and there are no red-headed clients to vex us with their conundrums."


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #237
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2002
    Posts
    3,987

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dewey View Post
    An article that may be of interest to readers of this thread:

    http://www.thedailybeast.com/newswee...n-t-worry.html
    Great article!
    I've always loved grammar (French grammar, in my case! Oh so tricky!) and languages, even as a kid, I loved dictations, I loved it when we had to map out / analyze sentences, I loved it all!

    But math? Talk about pulling teeth!!!
    Ottbs - The finish line is only the beginning!



  18. #238
    Join Date
    May. 31, 2004
    Location
    Fayetteville NC
    Posts
    396

    Default

    From someone who quietly corrects printed signs sporting wayward apostrophes and misspelled words, this thread is like a siren call I cannot resist. While I would agree language is indeed fluid, is the only alternative to allow it to deteriorate into a willy nilly soup of letters, without proper form or function?

    This is something up with which we cannot put!

    As for those who say they "could care less", perhaps they mean to say they "could NOT care less" about this thread.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  19. #239
    Join Date
    Sep. 4, 2012
    Location
    Southeast US
    Posts
    1,537

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fluffie View Post
    Or is that a well-wish?
    Absolutely. Not to be confused with the first star I see tonight-wish, the falling star-wish, the blowing out the birthday candle-wish, or the magic lantern-wish.



  20. #240
    Join Date
    Jul. 15, 2005
    Location
    Cambridge Springs, PA
    Posts
    3,122

    Default

    Do the people who spell lunge as longe or lounge pronounce it the way they spell it? Never quite understood longe, and lounge is just completely wrong. Never heard of longe before about 5 years ago... just seems pretentious.

    By the way:

    http://www.smartpakequine.com/search...tore_ID=Equine

    http://www.bitofbritain.com/SearchRe...p?Search=lunge

    http://equestrian.doversaddlery.com/search#w=lunge

    Try searching for "longe" .... you get a lot of long things.
    www.hogbackhillfarm.com



Similar Threads

  1. Phase V or Phase 5 Saddle
    By europa in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Feb. 10, 2011, 10:19 PM
  2. Longe exercises?
    By netg in forum Dressage
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Jan. 31, 2011, 09:40 PM
  3. Bucking on the Longe
    By Czar in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: Mar. 29, 2010, 09:55 PM
  4. Weird one- Teaching a dog to lunge (longe)?
    By kookicat in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: Jul. 16, 2009, 05:50 AM
  5. To longe or to lunge?
    By cnvh in forum Off Course
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: Apr. 23, 2009, 03:57 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •