The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 11 of 14 FirstFirst ... 910111213 ... LastLast
Results 201 to 220 of 267
  1. #201
    Join Date
    Nov. 29, 2007
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    914

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kate66 View Post
    Interesting observation, but I actually still think I am right. From Oxford dictionary online........
    "There is a distinction in meaning between infer and imply. In the sentence the speaker implied that the General had been a traitor, implied means that the speaker subtly suggested that this man was a traitor (though nothing so explicit was actually stated). However, in we inferred from his words that the General had been a traitor, inferred means that something in the speaker’s words enabled the listeners to deduce that the man was a traitor. The two words infer and imply can describe the same event, but from different angles. "
    Hmm, well, it seemed to me you were saying that the subject was writing something ("alright" vs. "all right"), and that subject (the writer) would then be implying something, that another person, the receiver or observer of the action, could then infer as "alright" or "all right." However, if someone read or heard "all right" vs "alright" and then wrote it according to his/her interpretation, then he or she would be inferring rather than implying, so maybe the latter is what you meant? (And isn't this stuff truly fun to think about? )

    BEVERLY, another Southerner here who grew up saying "coke" for any kind of soft drink! I've kind of trained myself out of it, but in my mind, "coke" is any soda/soft drink/pop.
    "However complicated and remarkable the rest of his life was going to be, it was here now, come to claim him."- JoAnn Mapson


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #202
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2011
    Location
    southeast Georgia
    Posts
    2,669

    Default

    People who feel that we shouldn't be having this discussion because there are more important things to worry about than the difference between "lie" and "lay" may assume that there is nothing but grammatical sniping going on. I must say that I don't feel it's appropriate on a public forum like this one to correct others' posts unless a)there is some genuine misunderstanding taking place or b)the other person is correcting others and needs to be put in her place. We all know that sometimes happens, but on the other, horse-related threads, I try not to correct people.

    However, I know that many people are inherently fascinated by language issues even if few people enjoy being corrected. I believe that this is true in spite of the fact that they may have been bored to tears by sentence diagramming in school or tedious worksheets on which they had to identify subject and predicate. People love talking about language. I use a sociolinguistics theme in my Composition II class, and the students love it.

    I belong to another forum, a baseball forum, in fact. Several years ago, I started a thread there called "The Grammar Thread" to enable people to discuss grammar issues and language in general. It attracted 632 posts.
    I heard a neigh. Oh, such a brisk and melodious neigh as that was! My very heart leaped with delight at the sound. --Nathaniel Hawthorne



  3. #203
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2000
    Location
    Chatham, NY USA
    Posts
    4,098

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RedHorses View Post
    The one that has me scratching my head is "me" - somewhere along the line "me" seems to have become a word that only idjits use ("me like hockey"). People are using "I" where they should be using "me" and I have to wonder why. "This is a picture of my horse and I" is incorrect use of "I". There's an easy way to check which to use - remove the other party and repeat the sentence. Would you say "This is a picture of I"? Of course not, you'd say "This is a picture of me" so when you put your horse back in it becomes "This is a picture of my horse and me." It works both ways - "My horse and I went on a hack today" is correct because you would also say "I went on a hack today."
    Because some grade school teacher went after a kid who said "Me & Tommy went to the movies.." "It's Tommy & I...Tommy & I...Tommy & I..." The drill stuck, the concept didn't. Yeah, it makes me stark raving crazy. I work with people who have their Master's and the number of them who JUST DON'T GET THE CONCEPT...I've tried to use the same examples as you, to no avail.
    Where's the beat head on desk icon?
    www.ayliprod.com
    Equine Photography in the Northeast



  4. #204
    Join Date
    Feb. 26, 2011
    Location
    Its not nowhere, but you can see it from here
    Posts
    3,550

    Default

    Not going to go through all 11 pages, I have read snippets here and there. Has anyone touched on the may/can confusion? It is one of my peeves as I try and raise semi-literate offspring
    From AliCat518 "Seriously, why would you NOT put fried chicken in your purse?!"



  5. #205
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2002
    Posts
    3,656

    Default

    Languages are fascinating!

    The English language has borrowed so many words from the French, it's mind boggling. Some are obvious (dressage / volte / piaffer / restaurant / rendez-vous...) but did you know, for instance, that mushroom comes from the French mousseron, which is a type of edible "champignon" that grows in fields?
    Ottbs - The finish line is only the beginning!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #206
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2011
    Location
    southeast Georgia
    Posts
    2,669

    Default

    That's fascinating, Sophie! I never would have guessed that "mushroom" has a French origin.

    I have enjoyed your posts. You referred to commas earlier. You might enjoy the recent best-seller Eats Shoots and Leaves by Lynne Truss. I have to admit I didn't read the entire thing. She was a little too fussy even for me.
    I heard a neigh. Oh, such a brisk and melodious neigh as that was! My very heart leaped with delight at the sound. --Nathaniel Hawthorne



  7. #207
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 2005
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    1,357

    Default

    My favorite Craigslist gems;
    Philly colt
    Chiwawa
    Chehua
    Spaded
    Genital
    Gentile
    Unfortunately, the list never ends.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  8. #208
    Join Date
    Nov. 29, 2007
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    914

    Default

    Hey, what are everyone's thoughts on "good" vs. "well" wishes? I think I may wish someone well, with "wish" being the verb modified by the adverb, "well," but I send someone "good" wishes or "best" wishes, not "well" wishes, because wishes in that case is a plural noun requiring an adverb to modify it. However, I know that plenty of folks reason persuasively that "well wishes" is correct. Thoughts?
    "However complicated and remarkable the rest of his life was going to be, it was here now, come to claim him."- JoAnn Mapson



  9. #209
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2011
    Location
    On a horse.
    Posts
    395

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rallycairn View Post
    Hey, what are everyone's thoughts on "good" vs. "well" wishes? I think I may wish someone well, with "wish" being the verb modified by the adverb, "well," but I send someone "good" wishes or "best" wishes, not "well" wishes, because wishes in that case is a plural noun requiring an adverb to modify it. However, I know that plenty of folks reason persuasively that "well wishes" is correct. Thoughts?
    In the case of "wish someone well", "well" is an adverb. Since "good" is an adjective, it can only modify a noun, not a verb. Therefore one can't "wish someone good" (unless you're wishing them into a state of goodness). However, "good wishes" is a noun phrase, as is "best wishes". In those cases you're seeing an adjective + noun. Since "well" isn't an adjective (it's an adverb), it would be grammatically incorrect in formal language to use "well wishes". That doesn't mean it can't be a colloquialism though



  10. #210
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2011
    Location
    southeast Georgia
    Posts
    2,669

    Default

    Actually, "well" can be an adjective, as in "I don't feel well" ("not ailing, healthy"). In this case, it's a predicate adjective. "Well wishes" seems to me to be used in a similar sense. "Well" in this case is used as an adjective meaning "in a satisfactory condition, right, proper."
    I heard a neigh. Oh, such a brisk and melodious neigh as that was! My very heart leaped with delight at the sound. --Nathaniel Hawthorne



  11. #211
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2011
    Location
    On a horse.
    Posts
    395

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dewey View Post
    Actually, "well" can be an adjective, as in "I don't feel well" ("not ailing, healthy"). In this case, it's a predicate adjective. "Well wishes" seems to me to be used in a similar sense. "Well" in this case is used as an adjective meaning "in a satisfactory condition, right, proper."
    Yes, "well" can be an adjective, but not in the instance I mentioned. Since wishes, themselves, can't have actual health, they can't be "well." Although someone can be a well-wisher. Similarly, one would say "good health" not "well health." Regardless, language is pretty flexible, and colloquial sayings often have their own, accepted rule sets.



  12. #212
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2011
    Location
    southeast Georgia
    Posts
    2,669

    Default

    I see your point, but "well" can also mean "right or proper," and I believe that in this sense "well wishes" is grammatical. We can agree to disagree, however. My copy of Fowler is in my office--will check it tomorrow to see if he weighs in on this.
    I heard a neigh. Oh, such a brisk and melodious neigh as that was! My very heart leaped with delight at the sound. --Nathaniel Hawthorne



  13. #213
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2011
    Location
    On a horse.
    Posts
    395

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dewey View Post
    I see your point, but "well" can also mean "right or proper," and I believe that in this sense "well wishes" is grammatical. We can agree to disagree, however. My copy of Fowler is in my office--will check it tomorrow to see if he weighs in on this.
    lol. I agree with you about the secondary meaning. Although, I'm beginning to think I'm a glutton for punishment because I logged on to COTH was a break from grading essays!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #214
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2011
    Location
    southeast Georgia
    Posts
    2,669

    Default

    Hahaha...so did I. I have three classes' worth I should be grading right now.

    Just thought of another instance: "I wish you well." "Well" here is an adjective acting as object complement. I think it has that secondary meaning here, not its primary (adjective) meaning of "healthy." OK, I promise: this is the last post I make tonight on "well."

    Good luck with the grading.
    I heard a neigh. Oh, such a brisk and melodious neigh as that was! My very heart leaped with delight at the sound. --Nathaniel Hawthorne


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #215
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2011
    Location
    On a horse.
    Posts
    395

    Default

    Wanna trade?! Maybe we should start a COTH grading exchange board, lol. I wonder how many other prof and teacher folk are on here?



  16. #216
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    In Trouble with Dad...
    Posts
    29,899

    Default

    I grade yours you grade mine?
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #217
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2011
    Location
    southeast Georgia
    Posts
    2,669

    Default

    Yeah, trading might reduce the boredom factor, but I suspect it would be only a temporary fix. Ah, well.
    I heard a neigh. Oh, such a brisk and melodious neigh as that was! My very heart leaped with delight at the sound. --Nathaniel Hawthorne



  18. #218

    Default

    Hope you feel "alot" better soon
    Exactly.
    Live Free Or Die Hard


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #219
    Join Date
    Apr. 27, 2008
    Posts
    2,160

    Default

    While we're grumping, I remember when "rescue" was a verb, not a noun.
    I have a Fjord! Life With Oden



  20. #220
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2006
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    5,291

    Default

    One that's been popping up on my Facebook feed tonight is a seemingly high end ranch/b&b in the area with a pretty decent fan base (a couple thousand "likes"). They've apparently recently acquired horses and have several posts to "name the new employees" (horses). Almost all of the posts with new geldings list them as:

    Gilding (boy horse)

    Where can I get me one of those gold-coated horses? I really want to suggest the name "Lily," but it's not a boy name and I don't think they'd get it.

    I will say that I expect to see that on Craigslist and other more-often-low-end places. But not on an upscale marketing facebook page. Sure doesn't make me feel like I'd be in good hands if I decided to spend a weekend with them!
    __________________________________
    Forever exiled in the NW.



Similar Threads

  1. Phase V or Phase 5 Saddle
    By europa in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Feb. 10, 2011, 09:19 PM
  2. Longe exercises?
    By netg in forum Dressage
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Jan. 31, 2011, 08:40 PM
  3. Bucking on the Longe
    By Czar in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: Mar. 29, 2010, 08:55 PM
  4. Weird one- Teaching a dog to lunge (longe)?
    By kookicat in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: Jul. 16, 2009, 04:50 AM
  5. To longe or to lunge?
    By cnvh in forum Off Course
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: Apr. 23, 2009, 02:57 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness