The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 10 of 14 FirstFirst ... 89101112 ... LastLast
Results 181 to 200 of 267
  1. #181
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2005
    Location
    Sandy, Utah
    Posts
    6,489

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by purplnurpl View Post
    I totally say soda and hoagie. : )
    So not Texan.

    One time my friend asked me to grab a "coke" for her at the gas station. So I bought a coke. I brought it back and she looks at it disgusted and says, "what's this? I wanted a Dr. Pepper."

    I'm still confused.
    Allow me to explain. In my homeland (Texas), carbonated nonalcoholic beverages are generically referred to as 'coke.' Not soda, not pop. So, here is the dialogue:

    Do you want a coke?
    Sure.
    What kind?

    And while I have the floor, may I inject only one of my pet peeves related to foxhunting? If you are 'non-paid' hunt staff (including secretary on the administrative end of things), you are HONORARY, not HONORABLE. As in, honorary whipper-in, honorary secretary, honorary huntsman. Meaning that you hold the position as an amateur. Now, you can call my husband 'honorable,' but he's a judge and actually not honorable when he forgets decades of experience and asks me a hard question (okay, any question) before I've had my first cup of coffee in the morning.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #182
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2005
    Location
    Australasia
    Posts
    1,204

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HeartsongHorses View Post
    This discussion is moot.

    1. open to discussion or debate; debatable; doubtful: a moot point.
    2. of little or no practical value or meaning; purely academic.

    This discussion is not mute

    1. silent; refraining from speech or utterance.
    2. not emitting or having sound of any kind.
    Oh gosh though, how I wish some discussions were indeed mute
    where am I, what day is it, am I still having a good time?


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #183
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 1999
    Location
    South Coast Plaza
    Posts
    20,488

    Default

    Another clanger: using "heresy" when you mean "hearsay."
    EDDIE WOULD GO


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #184
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2009
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,713

    Default

    Well I guess someone must inform the British Horse Society right away that they can't spell as in their books they have sections on LUNGING *sarcasm *


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #185
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    4,729

    Default

    if it helps the OPer any we taught our horses to work in a circle centered upon their handler without an attachment between the two, reverse on voice command.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #186
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2011
    Location
    southeast Georgia
    Posts
    3,374

    Default

    Lots of southerners use "coke" as a generic word for soda. When I lived in Boston, it was "tonic."
    I heard a neigh. Oh, such a brisk and melodious neigh as that was! My very heart leaped with delight at the sound. --Nathaniel Hawthorne



  7. #187
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2011
    Location
    southeast Georgia
    Posts
    3,374

    Default

    Pet peeve: using i.e. for e.g.

    "i.e.": id est, meaning "that is"
    "e.g.": exempli gratia, meaning "for example"
    I heard a neigh. Oh, such a brisk and melodious neigh as that was! My very heart leaped with delight at the sound. --Nathaniel Hawthorne


    3 members found this post helpful.

  8. #188
    Join Date
    Dec. 30, 2006
    Posts
    1,209

    Default

    Love the COTH grammar lessons!
    from sunridge1:Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.it is going to be good until the last drop!Eleneswell, the open trail begged to be used. D Taylor


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #189
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 1999
    Location
    Harrisburg, PA USA
    Posts
    6,546

    Default

    Oh, the Brits would change as much away from the French language as they could possibly do. No love lost there.



  10. #190
    Join Date
    Sep. 8, 2006
    Location
    Fredericksburg, VA
    Posts
    2,662

    Default

    And this one, which blows my mind:

    A person who owns his/her own restaurant is not a "restauraNteur" but a "restaurateur" -- no "N" -- seriously!

    And another one -- while you may loathe (with an "e") your SO's ex-wife/girlfriend, you are loath (NO "e") to create any drama with him/her!

    "Business!” cried the Ghost, wringing its hands again. “Mankind was my business. The common welfare was my business; charity, mercy, forbearance, and benevolence, were, all, my business.”


    2 members found this post helpful.

  11. #191
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    14,870

    Default

    Actually, the Brits like the French as a rule and have let old animosities die a natural death....they like their wine, their cheese, their food..

    But Winston Churchill called the enemy Nazzies; would not add the German pronounciation.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #192
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 1999
    Location
    Harrisburg, PA USA
    Posts
    6,546

    Default

    Sure, in modern times. But equestrian terminology goes back a long, long way, to when things were not quite so cozy.



  13. #193
    Join Date
    Sep. 4, 2012
    Location
    Southeast US
    Posts
    1,532

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by purplnurpl View Post
    I totally say soda and hoagie. : )
    So not Texan.

    One time my friend asked me to grab a "coke" for her at the gas station. So I bought a coke. I brought it back and she looks at it disgusted and says, "what's this? I wanted a Dr. Pepper."

    I'm still confused.
    I love comparing the different regional dialects. When I lived in Michigan, it was "pop" and "you guys." When I lived in eastern Pennsylvania, it was "soda" and "youse guys." When I lived in Texas, it was "coke" (even if you drank Dr. Pepper) and "y'all."

    When I first started traveling a lot for work, I used to end up cycling through all the regional terms for "pop" until I stopped getting the blank look in the server's eyes. I now generally always use "soft drink," which people everywhere seem to get. But, I grew up with "pop," so that's my default around home.



  14. #194
    Join Date
    Nov. 29, 2007
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,013

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kate66 View Post
    Of course if the person you are referring to was trying to infer "all right" by writing "alright" then indeed it would be wrong.
    (Emphasis mine)

    Another common one -- I think you should have used "imply" here, Kate, unless I'm misreading your meaning.
    "However complicated and remarkable the rest of his life was going to be, it was here now, come to claim him."- JoAnn Mapson


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #195
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2002
    Location
    Boogerville, USA
    Posts
    858

    Default

    One that I've not seen mentioned is when someone writes:
    "My horse is colicing!!" "My *pone coliced!!" It colicking/colicked.
    Would you go picnicing? No. "One time my friend and I picniced at that lake." No. No, you picnicked at that lake. It's picnicking/picnicked.


    *When grown people "baby-talk spell" pone for pony, or worse donk, for donkey. Donk is not a word. Please lose the cutsey; it's gagging me.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #196
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2003
    Location
    Nonsuch House
    Posts
    3,507

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CDE Driver View Post
    It is puzzling to me why people come on a thread like this and tell everyone that it is not a worthwhile discussion. If it is so bothersome to you why not just scroll past?

    I, for one, enjoy a lively discussion about our language. If not for the people that care about it I fear it will fall in to terrible disrepair.
    A valid point and maybe a moot point (it may already be in disrepair.) For those who think we should be more concerned with the downtrodden and poor, if they (the downtrodden and poor) were to use better language skills they might get the job they are applying for. Equestrian web sites that misspell conformation and confirmation make me wonder about their attention to detail.

    I just spoke to a friend who was trying to hire someone just to run a cash register and couldn't find anyone with proper speech, let alone spelling skills. They were not looking for a Mensa candidate. . . it was a grain store!
    RIP Kelly 1977-2007 "Wither thou goest, so shall I"

    "To tilt when you should withdraw is Knightly too."


    3 members found this post helpful.

  17. #197
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2007
    Location
    Maryland USA
    Posts
    1,586



  18. #198
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2003
    Posts
    3,589

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rallycairn View Post
    (Emphasis mine)

    Another common one -- I think you should have used "imply" here, Kate, unless I'm misreading your meaning.
    Interesting observation, but I actually still think I am right. From Oxford dictionary online........
    "There is a distinction in meaning between infer and imply. In the sentence the speaker implied that the General had been a traitor, implied means that the speaker subtly suggested that this man was a traitor (though nothing so explicit was actually stated). However, in we inferred from his words that the General had been a traitor, inferred means that something in the speaker’s words enabled the listeners to deduce that the man was a traitor. The two words infer and imply can describe the same event, but from different angles. "



  19. #199
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2003
    Posts
    3,589

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Eventer55 View Post
    A valid point and maybe a moot point (it may already be in disrepair.) For those who think we should be more concerned with the downtrodden and poor, if they (the downtrodden and poor) were to use better language skills they might get the job they are applying for. Equestrian web sites that misspell conformation and confirmation make me wonder about their attention to detail.

    I just spoke to a friend who was trying to hire someone just to run a cash register and couldn't find anyone with proper speech, let alone spelling skills. They were not looking for a Mensa candidate. . . it was a grain store!
    I completely agree with this. I work for a large corporation. I will not employ anyone with spelling mistakes on their resume as it reflects a lack of attention to detail, at a minimum, or a lacking in their education. Likewise I would not employ a vendor who submitted proposal documents that were rife with grammatical errors as I would feel that if they were incapable of taking the time to correct their submission or were incapable of recognising the error in their submission then they were not capable of doing the work that I requested.

    On the same vein, if a horse advert is written poorly, I am much less likely to bother looking at the horse.

    It spills into all sorts of areas - poor spelling, poor manners etc etc. I would never have dated a guy that couldn't use a knife and fork properly and who chewed with his mouth open either!


    6 members found this post helpful.

  20. #200
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2011
    Location
    On a horse.
    Posts
    395

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kate66 View Post
    I completely agree with this. I work for a large corporation. I will not employ anyone with spelling mistakes on their resume as it reflects a lack of attention to detail, at a minimum, or a lacking in their education. Likewise I would not employ a vendor who submitted proposal documents that were rife with grammatical errors as I would feel that if they were incapable of taking the time to correct their submission or were incapable of recognising the error in their submission then they were not capable of doing the work that I requested.

    On the same vein, if a horse advert is written poorly, I am much less likely to bother looking at the horse.

    It spills into all sorts of areas - poor spelling, poor manners etc etc. I would never have dated a guy that couldn't use a knife and fork properly and who chewed with his mouth open either!
    Hear-hear! I'm a university professor (English and literature), and am appalled at the "skills" with which my students are initially outfitted. I usually spend the first month of each semester attempting to convince them that literacy and language impact all areas of their lives.


    5 members found this post helpful.

Similar Threads

  1. Phase V or Phase 5 Saddle
    By europa in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Feb. 10, 2011, 10:19 PM
  2. Longe exercises?
    By netg in forum Dressage
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Jan. 31, 2011, 09:40 PM
  3. Bucking on the Longe
    By Czar in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: Mar. 29, 2010, 09:55 PM
  4. Weird one- Teaching a dog to lunge (longe)?
    By kookicat in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: Jul. 16, 2009, 05:50 AM
  5. To longe or to lunge?
    By cnvh in forum Off Course
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: Apr. 23, 2009, 03:57 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •