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  1. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dewey View Post
    Sophie, I always use the French Academy as an example when I talk to my students about language. They are always surprised to learn about it and sometimes wonder why Americans don't have something similar. I always tell them their grammar school teachers probably served the same purpose--and in any case, Americans tend to resist authority over such things.

    Out of curiosity, how do the average French people regard the authority of the French Academy's pronouncements? Do people actually listen to them and try to "obey" when they decide, for example, that "hot dog" should not be allowed into the French language? (I made up that example!) And what happens when people use words and phrases deemed "incorrect" by the Academy? Do they receive thirty lashes with a red pencil?
    I think it's a case of national pride...

    not to mention that French schools are much stricter than their US counter parts.

    (I am saying that as German who was amazed by the French system, and appalled by the US one...)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by CDE Driver View Post
    It is puzzling to me why people come on a thread like this and tell everyone that it is not a worthwhile discussion. If it is so bothersome to you why not just scroll past?

    I, for one, enjoy a lively discussion about our language. If not for the people that care about it I fear it will fall in to terrible disrepair.
    Oh, every now and then the urge to sit on that high horse just overwhelms certain folks.

    I mean, it's a horsey forum. People whine about their trainers, their horse-buying sagas, their saddles not fitting, their riding-related underwear issues, and sure, even riding-related spelling. And then someone has to scratch that itch to wade in with "but cancer! And death! AND DEATHCANCER!"


    14 members found this post helpful.

  3. #143
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    Another fascinating linguistic quirk is the "needs done" expression. "These stalls need cleaned," "these hooves need picked," "this wood needs split," and so on. I'm in the PNW and first heard this in the context of the horse world.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  4. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by arbiter View Post
    Another fascinating linguistic quirk is the "needs done" expression. "These stalls need cleaned," "these hooves need picked," "this wood needs split," and so on. I'm in the PNW and first heard this in the context of the horse world.
    That's very interesting. I collect regional expressions. Here in the South, people say "might could" all the time.

    My midwestern mother would always say "the dog wants out/in." Growing up, I never heard anyone else say that,
    I heard a neigh. Oh, such a brisk and melodious neigh as that was! My very heart leaped with delight at the sound. --Nathaniel Hawthorne


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  5. #145
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    Love this thread. Although it doesn't show up too much here, I hate "balling" when one means "bawling", and I REALLY wish people would just be done with it and say "crying" or maybe "crying really hard."

    The following excerpt from "Uncle" by one of my favorite poets of all time, James Tate, is, to me, the only proper use of the word "balling." Although there is not much proper about it.

    ..." the family never cared much for Homer, even after

    he ginned himself into a wall and died balling with a deaf-mute in an empty Kansas City Hall."

    Whoops! He made "gin" into a verb. Poetic license I guess.
    Only part of me worries...the other part doesn't believe in it.
    Wings of Desire



  6. #146
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    Fustrated and libary. Really?

    Oh! And a TA where I work says "Axe" instead of "Ask". I was THRILLED when a colleague (fellow rider!) chimed in and said, "She's not going to AXE you ANYTHING!"
    Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
    White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

    Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  7. #147
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    "He was tasked with . . ." AARGH! I have actually heard this on NPR, fer crissake!
    What's wrong with you?? Your cheese done slid off its cracker?!?!



  8. #148
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    All right is two words!

    When someone says borrowed instead of loaned. "I borrowed her my car."

    Boughten.

    The last two drive me batty when I hear them used.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #149
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dewey View Post
    My midwestern mother would always say "the dog wants out/in." Growing up, I never heard anyone else say that,
    Not in the midwest and we say that around here too. Very frequently (since the dog wants in/out way too often).


    4 members found this post helpful.

  10. #150
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    Quote Originally Posted by oliverreed View Post
    "He was tasked with . . ." AARGH! I have actually heard this on NPR, fer crissake!
    Oh, if you're in the military you're constantly tasked with something or other. You learn to deal with it
    Eventually you get to task others with stuff.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  11. #151
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    Quote Originally Posted by dacasodivine View Post
    All right is two words!.
    Totally disagree with this. As the daughter of 2 teachers and having been brought up in the great British education system, I can assure you that "alright" is indeed a word.

    "All right" means that everything was right
    "alright" means it was OK, not great, but OK

    For example,
    "These numbers are all right". However, perhaps after a concert or a meeting "It was alright".

    Totally different meanings.

    Of course if the person you are referring to was trying to infer "all right" by writing "alright" then indeed it would be wrong.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  12. #152
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    Quote Originally Posted by arbiter View Post
    Another fascinating linguistic quirk is the "needs done" expression. "These stalls need cleaned," "these hooves need picked," "this wood needs split," and so on. I'm in the PNW and first heard this in the context of the horse world.
    Also here in the PNW and I've never heard that one...horse world or elsewhere.

    What does drive me crazy is the pronunciation of Washington as WaRshington.....by people who have grown up here (meaning they don't have an accent to blame)!
    __________________________________
    Forever exiled in the NW.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  13. #153
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    Learned this one not too long ago and it blew my mind! I didn't realize that "comprised of" is 100% incorrect.


    http://grammarist.com/usage/compose-comprise/


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #154
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    I enjoy a discussion on the language - what I don't like is the snobbery or
    disdain for others that comes through many posts.

    I hereby give notice that I cannot type, I cannot spell, I am dyslexic, poorly educated and I find print hard to read these days without glasse. AND I couldn't care less.

    Especially annoying is when somebody comes on to criticise and get it wrong.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique


    4 members found this post helpful.

  15. #155
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eventer55 View Post
    Hope you feel "alot" better soon
    This has probably been posted her, but just in case...

    http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.co...verything.html

    makes me laugh out loud every single time!



  16. #156
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kate66 View Post
    Totally disagree with this. As the daughter of 2 teachers and having been brought up in the great British education system, I can assure you that "alright" is indeed a word.

    "All right" means that everything was right
    "alright" means it was OK, not great, but OK

    For example,
    "These numbers are all right". However, perhaps after a concert or a meeting "It was alright".

    Totally different meanings.

    Of course if the person you are referring to was trying to infer "all right" by writing "alright" then indeed it would be wrong.
    aight....
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  17. #157
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    I happily use both.

    LONGE: When I work my two appaloosa mares it is longe. They obediently work around me in a controlled manner at the speeds I ask for, no tugging, pulling, dragging of human involved.


    LUNGE: When I work my mule ( sometimes) it is lunge. Even when wearing a bit he does on occasion put me in a waterski type activity. Where there is tugging, pulling, dragging involved .



  18. #158
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dewey View Post

    Out of curiosity, how do the average French people regard the authority of the French Academy's pronouncements? Do people actually listen to them and try to "obey" when they decide, for example, that "hot dog" should not be allowed into the French language? (I made up that example!) And what happens when people use words and phrases deemed "incorrect" by the Academy? Do they receive thirty lashes with a red pencil?
    Hehe, 30 lashes! That would be fun!
    The Academy has actually passed "decrets" that are simplifying rules, or accepting several spellings or uses as correct, so it's all for the better!

    Journalists tend to ignore the Academy and use "franglais". I have seen TV programs where the journalist / host was using English terms (such as, "c'est un "tribute" à ...) and the guest (actor and comedian) answered "Oui c'est un hommage à ...". So people do care. Some take it a bit too far!

    I always tell my students who go to France, not to be taken aback if they try speaking French and people answer them in English (it's because they want to practice their English, nothing more) or if people correct them (most are truly trying to be helpful, not mean!).

    When I was a student I took a course called "indo-european languages" and it was just fascinating.

    I want one of those T-shirts that says

    The Power of the Comma:
    Let's eat Grandma.
    Let's eat, Grandma.
    Ottbs - The finish line is only the beginning!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #159
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jane Honda View Post
    I love word play too! Spoonerisms will have me rolling with laughter quicker than anything.
    Technically speaking the following was a spoonerism - well half a spoonerism anyway. (Warning: extremely rude word uttered on BBC)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-JpNravrwZc



  20. #160
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    Quote Originally Posted by PNWjumper View Post
    Also here in the PNW and I've never heard that one...horse world or elsewhere.

    What does drive me crazy is the pronunciation of Washington as WaRshington.....by people who have grown up here (meaning they don't have an accent to blame)!
    I've heard the "needs XXXX" expression, just within the past year. I too am in PNW. Another thing I've heard here is the non-negative use of "any more" (or is it now officially "anymore"?).

    I grew up saying things like "I can't see the horse any more" or "The sun never shines any more". Not only two words, but also used in conjunction with a negative. Here in the PNW I hear things like "It's so sunny anymore!" Huh? And of course when I HEAR it I can't tell whether it is one word or two, but I have seen it written as one word and MS Word actually corrects me when I try to write it as two. So that's TWO THINGS (hats off to Llamas with Hats, for anyone who gets that reference!).
    Arrange whatever pieces come your way. - Virginia Woolf

    Did you know that if you say the word "GULLIBLE" really softly, it sounds like "ORANGES"?



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