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  1. #121
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    Sep. 13, 2002
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    living in red neck valley...
    yeesh--
    People say, "I haven't never" or "I haven't ever"
    OMG.
    I've caught myself letting it slip once or twice, at which point I slap myself.
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #122
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    Oct. 1, 2005
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    Sandy, Utah
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    Hey Nezzy, it's grammar police. Sorry, as an erstwhile spelling bee queen I just couldn't resist.

    Must skip much reading since I need to get back to work! But as to the original post, indeed, 'longe' is correct, it is an Anglicization of zee French word. Just like dressage for example. My theory is 'lunge' came to be acceptable for the same reasons many immigrants got new names when they got to Ellis Island- someone heard the correct French pronunciation and just winged it.

    But really, 'lunge' originated as a fencing term.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  3. #123
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    Oct. 23, 2004
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    Sisters, Oregon
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    "I seen it".... that makes me want to scream.

    The word literally. I'm quite sure most people don't know what that means.
    Kanoe Godby
    www.dyrkgodby.com
    See, I was raised by wolves and am really behind the 8-ball on diplomatic issue resolution.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  4. #124
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    Dec. 2, 2009
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    Oh, and I typically spell it longeing even though my little spelling thing screams at me, because longing makes it read like I am missing my horse, and lunging makes it read like I am removing his lungs, and lungeing...well, that reads like I am jumping at him randomly (which I'm sure he would not appreciate either.)

    I am aware, however, that both longe and lunge are correct.



  5. #125
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 1999
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    Harrisburg, PA USA
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    5,620

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    Quote Originally Posted by purplnurpl View Post
    we don't speak English, we speak American.
    Slaughter away...

    and also, lunge is correct. Go try to by a longe line and see how far you get...
    I've bought longe lines several times. Yes, the word is French, as are many of our equestrian terms. So if you learn classical terms, you learn Longe and most certainly would never write "lunge," which is simply a phonetic spelling of the French word. Dressage, anyone? Haut ├ęcole? Passage? Pirouette?


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  6. #126
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    Aug. 31, 2011
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    southeast Georgia
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ace View Post
    OMG, RedHorses! That's exactly how I figure out when to use "me" or "I", too! I think that people think "I" sounds more formal somehow, so default to that when in doubt. I also hate when people say "myself" when they mean "me."

    As for lunge vs. longe, I wonder if that's a regional thing. I'm from the Midwest and we always said "lunge." I wondered if "longe" was like line-driving or something.

    I try not to have too many grammatical/speaking pet peeves since I'm sure I use a number of things incorrectly, but I still have some!
    This tendency is what sociolinguists call hyper-correction. People want to be correct, so the use a word that sounds more correct even if it is incorrect. This tendency often occurs with who and whom also. Another example is the compulsion to say "I feel badly" instead of "I feel bad."
    Last edited by Dewey; Feb. 26, 2013 at 01:08 PM.
    I heard a neigh. Oh, such a brisk and melodious neigh as that was! My very heart leaped with delight at the sound. --Nathaniel Hawthorne



  7. #127
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2007
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    Maryland USA
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    1,446

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    Saw this elsewhere. Thought of all you comma aficionados. http://imgur.com/n9yaZJT


    2 members found this post helpful.

  8. #128
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    Sep. 4, 2012
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    Southeast US
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pennywell Bay View Post
    Lunge and longe are both right. Now, don't get me started on confirmation/conformation, soda vs pop, sauce/gravy, hoagie/sub....
    I think of soda vs pop and hoagie vs sub as being simply regional differences in dialect, not matters of correct vs incorrect.


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  9. #129
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    Dec. 29, 1999
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    Harrisburg, PA USA
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    Many words come from other places and are corruptions that take on a life of their own. Growing up in the 1960s I remember hearing WWII veterans say, "that little pissant" when they were speaking derogatively about someone. Piss ant. As a little kid I didn't know what it meant but I knew it wasn't good. Piss + ant. Got it. When I got older and learned that "pis" is French for "worst" and "pissant" means "pissing," sure, the soldiers picked it up in France, and not knowing exactly the translation, they got the gist. Another one I remember was hearing about a trifle, that it's "a bag of shells." A bagatelle, of course. When you only hear the language and don't see it written, a lot of things happen. Like lunge.


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  10. #130
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    Aug. 31, 2011
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    southeast Georgia
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    Well, I do have my language pet peeves--a lot of them. However, after grad school in rhetoric-composition and a long career as a writing instructor, I learned two lessons that help keep my blood pressure down:

    1) English is constantly evolving and has been for centuries. It can't be fixed or set in stone. Samuel Johnson learned this over the course of producing his masterwork, the first great English dictionary, in the 18th century, and it is still true.

    2) The role of a good dictionary is descriptive rather than prescriptive. Non-standard words are still words and people use them, so they belong in the dictionary. They will be labeled non-standard, but they are still words.

    Every generation is horrified at the language of the generation after it. Some of the change is what we might see as "good" and some "bad," but we can't stop the process. All we can control is the way we ourselves speak and write. And while some modern usages make me roll my eyes, other new words are wonderful. I learn that from my students all the time.
    I heard a neigh. Oh, such a brisk and melodious neigh as that was! My very heart leaped with delight at the sound. --Nathaniel Hawthorne


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  11. #131
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    Sep. 2, 2005
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    Upstate NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by NoSuchPerson View Post
    I think of soda vs pop and hoagie vs sub as being simply regional differences in dialect, not matters of correct vs incorrect.
    Yes, totally. Those comparisons have nothing to do with the conformation/confirmation difference.



  12. #132
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Packing my bags
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    Quote Originally Posted by tangledweb View Post
    Saw this elsewhere. Thought of all you comma aficionados. http://imgur.com/n9yaZJT
    kind of like the thing with Uncle Jack and his horse...
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.


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  13. #133
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    Jun. 7, 2002
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    Yes language is, and should be, evolving!
    I love this thread. I'm a linguist and love playing with language(s).

    I use longeing because it is the same verb in French, and acceptable in English, so easy for me (In French you longe your horse and you use a longe - same word, one is a verb, one is a noun). Lunge just brings me back to my fencing days, and feels wrong when working with a horse, unless said horse is aggressive and lunging at his handler, which I have witnessed!

    Another amusing one: it is a Baucher bit, not a Boucher. A "boucher" is a French butcher. :P

    It is always surprising to me to see how many times people will confuse your/ you're, there/their/they're, course/coarse, border/boarder, etc. etc.

    I come from a country whose language is protected by its own Academy...and said Academy is rather strict, but does allow changes. It's quite interesting and funny to see them fight over what is admissible and what is not.
    Ottbs - The finish line is only the beginning!


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  14. #134
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    Apr. 14, 2007
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    Pen Argyl PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beverley View Post
    Hey Nezzy, it's grammar police. Sorry, as an erstwhile spelling bee queen I just couldn't resist.

    Must skip much reading since I need to get back to work! But as to the original post, indeed, 'longe' is correct, it is an Anglicization of zee French word. Just like dressage for example. My theory is 'lunge' came to be acceptable for the same reasons many immigrants got new names when they got to Ellis Island- someone heard the correct French pronunciation and just winged it.

    But really, 'lunge' originated as a fencing term.
    Geez- am i a moron or what? I know better- i just made a typo. Ha!


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  15. #135
    Join Date
    Nov. 27, 2009
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    Gladstone, Oregon
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    I love word play too! Spoonerisms will have me rolling with laughter quicker than anything.


    What a fun thread!
    Quote Originally Posted by dizzywriter View Post
    My saddle fits perfectly well. It might be a little tight around the waist, but I take care of that with those spandex things.



  16. #136
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2001
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    Cambridge, IA
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    1,671

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    Ok, mine is in the spoken language: "ath-a-lete", vs "athlete". My ears bleed.

    I can deal with any spelling for that thing we do with horses running around in circles around us except "lounging". Sorry. That would be the opposite of the intended meaning.

    Watching the movie Lincoln made me want to be more eloquent. Wow!

    And to those who say this topic isn't relevant due to so much suffering in the world, I would point out that it was started by someone who was suffering with an illness, probably to alleviate her suffering with distraction. Pick up the clue phone, I'm sure it's for you.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  17. #137
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    Aug. 31, 2011
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    southeast Georgia
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    Sophie, I always use the French Academy as an example when I talk to my students about language. They are always surprised to learn about it and sometimes wonder why Americans don't have something similar. I always tell them their grammar school teachers probably served the same purpose--and in any case, Americans tend to resist authority over such things.

    Out of curiosity, how do the average French people regard the authority of the French Academy's pronouncements? Do people actually listen to them and try to "obey" when they decide, for example, that "hot dog" should not be allowed into the French language? (I made up that example!) And what happens when people use words and phrases deemed "incorrect" by the Academy? Do they receive thirty lashes with a red pencil?
    I heard a neigh. Oh, such a brisk and melodious neigh as that was! My very heart leaped with delight at the sound. --Nathaniel Hawthorne


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  18. #138
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    Mar. 10, 2007
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    Montana
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    Thinking about this too-in this age of facebook and craigslist and texting and perhaps marginal education systems there are so many people communicating in writing that probably wouldn't be if it weren't for technology. I do think it's dragging down the curve in a lot of ways and I really can't read the worst of craigslist for very long but it is entertaining and fascinating to see how quickly language has gotten caught up in the communication technology vortex.

    Like the word "catfish", a year or so ago it was unheard of in the context of being a social media fake, but now it has its own tv show! And "regift" and "yadayadayada" ...Seinfeld deserves his own chapter in the vernacular.

    I use "..." a lot in emails and message board, I've seen that mentioned as an annoyance here but I don't care, it's just my casual writing style. I don't use it in cover letters, I use it casually.

    I say pop and it's perfectly correct here in Montana. I also say crick instead of creek. I don't apologize for either one. But I don't think I've ever used a double negative in my life; I trained it out of my husband too.


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  19. #139
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    Aug. 31, 2011
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    southeast Georgia
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    This whole longe-lunge discussion reminds me of our American name for a certain kind of patio chair, the "chaise lounge" as we say. Of course, this comes from the French "chaise longe" (long chair). But how many Americans know that? We all say "chaise lounge," and that's the way the phrase appears in print 99 times out of 100. Its origin is just an interesting bit of trivia.
    I heard a neigh. Oh, such a brisk and melodious neigh as that was! My very heart leaped with delight at the sound. --Nathaniel Hawthorne



  20. #140
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    Nov. 8, 2001
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    Cambridge, IA
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    Oh yeah, overuse of the ellipsis. Maybe not the most precise writing style...

    Ha ha ha.


    3 members found this post helpful.

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