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  1. #41
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    Mar. 14, 2004
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    You know what annoys me? Being told I shouldn't be bothered by something! And really, it is our LANGUAGE; I don't think that is insignificant. Nor do I think that the peeved people on this thread rank grammatical indiscretions above chronic illnesses or animal losses. It doesn't always have to be black and white -- "this problem is not as significant as <insert here> so it has no merit at all and you're shallow for bringing it up."

    By the way, just as longe and lunge are both considered correct, so is worming a proper word for removing/eliminating worms.

    2worm

    verb
    Definition of WORM

    intransitive verb
    : to move or proceed sinuously or insidiously

    transitive verb
    1
    a : to proceed or make (one's way) insidiously or deviously <worm their way into positions of power — Bill Franzen>
    b : to insinuate or introduce (oneself) by devious or subtle means
    c : to cause to move or proceed in or as if in the manner of a worm

    2
    : to wind rope or yarn spirally round and between the strands of (a cable or rope) before serving

    3
    : to obtain or extract by artful or insidious questioning or by pleading, asking, or persuading —usually used with out of <finally wormed the truth out of him>

    4
    : to treat (an animal) with a drug to destroy or expel parasitic
    worms
    Arrange whatever pieces come your way. - Virginia Woolf

    Did you know that if you say the word "GULLIBLE" really softly, it sounds like "ORANGES"?


    11 members found this post helpful.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
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    between the barn and the pond
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    Well, we really all should be doing something for the poor and downtrodden, but here we are on COTH, telling people how to spell, or telling people how to act.

    At least the former stands a chance of correcting someone's mistake.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2009
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    85

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    I love this thread! I am with the OP and am bothered by the use of words that should have been learned in grade school. However, my husband and I have these conversations regularly, since he can't spell, and I am not good at math. Neither of us can understand why the other one has a problem! : )


    4 members found this post helpful.

  4. #44
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Packing my bags
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gestalt View Post
    I'm learning to let go of my spelling foibles. Using the phone has humbled me.

    LOL, autocorrect does generally not help either
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  5. #45
    Join Date
    Sep. 4, 2012
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    Southeast US
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    I hate "wala." It's not "wala," it's "voila." (OK, yes, technically there should be an accent over the a, but since that's not a standard English keyboard character, I think just the "voila" is close enough.)


    10 members found this post helpful.

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Apr. 25, 2008
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    To quote the great Henry Higgins in My Fair Lady:

    Why can't the English teach their children how to speak?
    Norwegians learn Norwegian, the Greeks are taught their Greek
    In France every Frenchman knows his language from 'A' to 'Zed' -
    ....well, the French don't care what they do, actually, as long as they pronounce it properly.
    Arabians learn Arabian with the speed of summer lightning.
    The Hebrews learn it backwards which is absolutely frightening.
    Use proper English, you're regarded as a freak.
    Oh, why can't the English -
    Why can't the English learn to speak?!
    A great movie to watch, by the way, when you're simply lounging about!
    Quote Originally Posted by alicen View Post
    We have no intentions of tarring and feathering anyone: this is now a thread about dipping Ryan Reynolds in chocolate.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  7. #47
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    Dec. 7, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carolinadreamin' View Post
    To quote the great Henry Higgins in My Fair Lady:



    A great movie to watch, by the way, when you're simply lounging about!
    And don't forget, "there are even places where English completely disappears, why in America they haven't used it for years."


    10 members found this post helpful.

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Dec. 12, 2004
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    Massachusetts
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    Quote Originally Posted by SLR View Post
    I've been looking at a lot of farm ads lately and the barns have aisles not isles.
    Even barn builders have incorrect spelling. sheesh.
    Quote Originally Posted by Chezzie View Post
    Unless those farms have small land masses surrounded by water, aisle is correct.
    I imagine the barn builders have it spelled "aisle" because it is, indeed, the correct spelling.


    7 members found this post helpful.

  9. #49
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    Mar. 10, 2007
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    Montana
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    My British Literature professor in college insisted that language was fluid and changed by the people that used it. Sure, there are grammar and spelling rules that are being broken every day but for me any more it is a question of degrees. This board is casual conversation; this isn't formal writing.

    By and large, the people on COTH are freaking Shakespeare compared to some of what you'll find on craigslist. Go read craigslist ads for a while and then come back; it'll be better.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  10. #50
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    Feb. 3, 2005
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    Southern Ontario
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    910

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    Back to the OP's original longe/lunge complaint. The Oxford Canadian Dictionary uses 'lunge', and presents 'longe' as a variation of the word.


    Incorrect spelling on my part upsets me so that I keep the dictionary beside the computer. Sad, isn't it?


    2 members found this post helpful.

  11. #51
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    Sep. 14, 1999
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    Just Enough Farm, GA
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    Craigslist makes my eyes bleed.

    The most recent mis-usage trend that chaps my hiney is sale/sell. "I need to sale my horse." I see variations of this all the time.
    If you believe everything you read, better not read. -- Japanese Proverb



    4 members found this post helpful.

  12. #52
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    Sep. 4, 2012
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    Southeast US
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoForAGallop View Post
    I imagine the barn builders have it spelled "aisle" because it is, indeed, the correct spelling.
    I believe SLR was addressing the "Barns have aisles not isles" comment to the barn builders, who spelled it "isle." At least that's the way I heard it in my head.


    7 members found this post helpful.

  13. #53
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    Nov. 29, 2007
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    Virginia
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedHorses View Post
    The one that has me scratching my head is "me" - somewhere along the line "me" seems to have become a word that only idjits use ("me like hockey"). People are using "I" where they should be using "me" and I have to wonder why. "This is a picture of my horse and I" is incorrect use of "I". There's an easy way to check which to use - remove the other party and repeat the sentence. Would you say "This is a picture of I"? Of course not, you'd say "This is a picture of me" so when you put your horse back in it becomes "This is a picture of my horse and me." It works both ways - "My horse and I went on a hack today" is correct because you would also say "I went on a hack today."
    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
    http://imglol.com/media/a/a2/a2t/a2t2k-no-lunging.jpg

    When did "and" become interchangeable with "to?"

    I hear it on the news, in print, etc. Is it actually considered okay now?

    In this context:

    "I tried to go and help them!"

    instead of:
    "I tried to go to help them!"

    The first sentence doesn't make any sense. I tried to go. I tried to help them. They're not seperates [sic] that need a conjunction: I tried to go TO help them.
    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post


    of instead of have really kills me...
    could of done this, when you should HAVE done that...
    All of these are huge peeves of mine, along with the rampant misuse of "then" for "than." It is other THAN that, not other thEn that, etc. Much more esoteric is that the correct usage is "different from" rather than "different than" in most cases, but I can live with that one.

    Oh, and Misty, there is "a rat" in "separate."
    "However complicated and remarkable the rest of his life was going to be, it was here now, come to claim him."- JoAnn Mapson



  14. #54
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    Dec. 12, 2004
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    Massachusetts
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    Quote Originally Posted by NoSuchPerson View Post
    I believe SLR was addressing the "Barns have aisles not isles" comment to the barn builders, who spelled it "isle." At least that's the way I heard it in my head.
    Yeah but she said "the barns have aisles," referencing the barns in the barn builder ads that she had just been reading.



  15. #55
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    Feb. 9, 2005
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    Ocala, FL
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    Well, this thread seems to have turned into a grammar-slam, but I found this in Wikipedia regarding the OPs topic:
    The word is believed to be derived from either the French word allonge,[1] meaning "to lengthen",[2] or the Latinlonga ("long").[1] In both cases, the root word featured spelling with an "o" and emphasize lengthening and extension, so although always pronounced "lungeing", the traditional spelling of the word in English is "longeing",[3][4] and this spelling has been used by the majority of past dressage masters,[5] and remains in use by traditional horsemanship organizations in the United States such as the United States Pony Clubs.[6]
    The more phonetic "lungeing" spelling dates back to the 1800s,[1][7] but has only become popular since the late 20th century. It is now used by an increasing number of books and magazine articles on the subject[8] and in theUnited Kingdom, is the spelling both the British Horse Society[9] and the Association of British Riding Schools(ABRS)[10] use in their material. It is also the usual spelling in both New Zealand and Australia,[11] and, since 2009, by the FEI in their equestrian vaulting rules.[12]
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longeing


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #56
    Join Date
    Dec. 26, 2011
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    CT
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    191

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    I have to say I would take any spelling error over the 'so' trend, it's not just tweenage girls anymore either.
    People don't seem to get that you do NOT start a sentence with so, it is an adverb that modifies an adjective, you don't just throw it into a sentence to take up space!
    Please support S. 1406 to amend the Horse Protection Act and Prevent all Soring Tactics to the Tennessee Walking horse!
    https://www.popvox.com/bills/us/113/s1406


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #57
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2005
    Location
    Georgia
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    2,521

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    Quote Originally Posted by tidy wabbit View Post
    You know, in the grand scheme of things, there are people on this board who have terminal illnesses, who have dead or dying horses; who have chronic illnesses which cause them great pain; who have families who are abusive, etc.

    Slaughtering the english language is way down on the list of things that should irritate everyone.

    I hope you feel better. And that you realize how lucky you are to be irritated by little things. You will recover from the flu. Others would love to have your problems.
    Was just sitting here reading and thought the same thing. Must be wonderful to have so few problems that spelling and grammar seem a big deal to you.
    You know why cowboys don't like Appaloosas?" - Answer: Because to train a horse, you have to be smarter than it is.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #58
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    Feb. 6, 2007
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    Maryland USA
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    The American-English phrase that bugs me the most is "horseback riding". Are there so many people engaged in horsefront riding that you need to specify rather than just say "horse riding"?


    2 members found this post helpful.

  19. #59
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    Jul. 19, 2007
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    Michigan
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    Quote Originally Posted by sketcher View Post
    It's Lyme disease. Not Lymes or lyme's disease. Lyme. No S!!!
    That one drives me up a wall. Lyme disease. THERE IS NO S. IT IS NOT A PLURAL OR A POSSESSIVE. Your horse has Lyme disease, not "Lymes."


    3 members found this post helpful.

  20. #60
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    Apr. 27, 2008
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    2,463

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    Quote Originally Posted by ILuvmyButtercups View Post
    Don't even get me started on "flatting", "lessoning", oh, my poor head.
    I feel the same way about "gifting." It's supposed to be a noun, not a verb.
    I have a Fjord! Life With Oden



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