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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 29, 2012
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    14

    Default Canada Questions

    I am thinking about trying/buying a horse from Canada and have no experience on the ins and outs. It is located a few hours away from the border.

    Can anyone on this forum direct me to a "primer" so I can plan properly. I think the horse may come on a week or two trial before any sale is finalized. Is there a quarantine period (relevant in light of the scares in Fl.) what are the health cert requirements. It may also need to be measured in the US as well to make sure it is a small Junior. Do you need or is it prudent to get an agent to help with border crossings etc.

    Looking for any insight from those who have prior experience



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 15, 2013
    Posts
    12

    Default

    Check out the CFIA (Canadian Food Inspection Agency) website. They govern our import/export of horses. It's been a while but I believe for a trial you would still have to do a permanent import because its for a sale. You would need negative coggins test, health cert, and they are all drawn up by a vet here, then sent for the CFIA vet to stamp before the horse can cross the border.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2008
    Posts
    638

    Default

    No expert but I found this online - hope it helps

    http://www.hcbc.ca/_customelements/u...GFACTSHEET.pdf



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2008
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    638

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sarcam02 View Post
    No expert but I found this online - hope it helps

    http://www.hcbc.ca/_customelements/u...GFACTSHEET.pdf
    Oops I see that this is focused on horses coming into Canada. Not what you need. Hope someone else can give better info



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 30, 2006
    Posts
    1,018

    Default

    While it would be helpful to have an agent, it isn't necessary. Use a Canadian shipper who crosses the border regularly and knows what he's doing. There is no quarantine but you do need a vet certificate and current coggins.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    West
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    1,009

    Default

    When you import a Canadian horse, you have to have a border agent who inspects the horse and checks it's paperwork. It is a pain but it's the only way. They are vets and you have to make an appointment way ahead of time. This is for when you buy a horse, not for when it is just traveling across the border for shows.
    ******
    "A good horse and a good rider are only so in mutual trust."
    -H.M.E.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2005
    Location
    Canada/Phoenix AZ
    Posts
    862

    Default

    I cross the boarder all the time. You need a current coggins( 6 months). And health certificate which will in your case be a permanent export, within thirty days. The vet is at the boarder regular business hours. Each crossing will have vet hrs posted on a web site. Make sure your address info on the coggins and the health certificate match. And the horses description is accurate.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 30, 2006
    Posts
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    Default

    The border vet is not an agent for the importer.

    Quote Originally Posted by Horseymama View Post
    When you import a Canadian horse, you have to have a border agent who inspects the horse and checks it's paperwork. It is a pain but it's the only way. They are vets and you have to make an appointment way ahead of time. This is for when you buy a horse, not for when it is just traveling across the border for shows.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 16, 2001
    Location
    The Great White North, where we get taxed out the wazoo
    Posts
    638

    Default

    You can have the papers signed by the Ag Canada vet in advance if its just going over, they are only good for 30 days. Then its less of a PITA.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2004
    Location
    North Florida
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    2,436

    Default

    I just sold a horse TO someone in Canada. We had to get a different health certificate than we usually use, approved by the USDA for crossing the boarder. Although it may benefit you to convert US Dollars to Canadian dollars, I know the new owner had to pay a tax (I believe it was 14%) on the sale price to get him in the country.
    I assume they'd still tax the sale if the horse were leaving the country , so I'd plan and find out about that. Even if you don't pay it, it could be reflected in the sales price if the seller has to pay.

    I'm talking out of school on your specific question of IMPORTING a horse from Canada.......but just thought I'd offer this food for thought......... Good Luck!
    www.flyingcolorsfarm.comHome of pinto stallion Claim to Fame and his homozygous son, Counterclaim. Friend us on Facebook!https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Fl...04678589573428


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 25, 2007
    Location
    Where it either rains or snows
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    Default

    The tax is HST and is 13% of the sale price (I would assume you have to pay it as your are buying the horse in Canada).
    Last edited by SimplyStated; Feb. 26, 2013 at 08:51 AM. Reason: can't spell



  12. #12
    not really new is offline Training Level
    Original Poster
    Join Date
    May. 29, 2012
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    14

    Default

    This is all great information - thank you.

    More questions - so if you work out a deal (prospective sale or lease) to take a horse on a short trial 1-2 weeks max and it works out would you pay the 13% to the government at border crossing or when the deal is consumated?

    Assuming you must pay tax at the border for the prospective sale/lease and if it does not work out - you are shipping the horse back - do you lose the tax you may have already paid?



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2008
    Posts
    638

    Default

    this link seems to have some good information

    http://www.equinecanada.ca/index.php...id=703&lang=en



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug. 3, 2009
    Location
    Camp Creek, WV
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    Default

    The Canadian and US dollar are currently about on par. (So close switching from one currency to another might save you $100 on a $10000 sale.)
    Regarding taxes...US buyers do not have to pay Federal GST (still 7% right? I haven't been home in a really long time!) Each province has different provincial tax, just like state sales tax in the US. Alberta has none. I believe if the seller arranges with a hauler to take the horse out of Canada no provincial tax needs be collected. In either case, if they collected tax from you, I believe you would be eligible for a refund.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr. 18, 2006
    Posts
    118

    Default

    Your taxes will be based on what province your bringing it out of. So for the next I think month - BC has HST (12%) this is a harmonized tax, so you can't pull out what is provincial and what is federal. You pay the shabang. Now I believe, but its been MANY MANY years since I've even crossed the border with a horse, but I think as an American citizen you may either be exempt from the tax, or you can apply to have it returned back to you.
    Also be prepared, if the Vet Certificate and Coggins is not being paid for by the current Canadian owner, be ready for the bill shell shock. What you Americans pay for vet cert and coggins is peanuts compared to what we pay here (atleast in BC) I think the last horse I took across was 10 years ago and the price then was $200. And I can't see the price going down over the past many years.

    Again, depending on the province, some border crossings only have livestock inspectors/border guards only at certain times and days. Its always best to call ahead and arrange the crossing time.

    And finally, and this is why I haven't crossed the border for sometime with horses, is the border natzi's. If they suspect anything that smells like a sale, they will google the horse - find the ad and nail you on bringing a horse across without an undeclared sale. Even if its a trial period, thats not something in their language... you will be asked to pay for the sales tax regardless. The last horse we had taken down for a free lease to friends who needed to borrow a broodmare for the season. Because they found her 2 year old ad, they were nailed as trying to sneak the horse sale across the border. And this was the first time we dealt with it, but not the first time I've heard of it.

    Your best bet is to call the crossing that you will be going over and just talk to an agent ahead of time so that there are no surprises.


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  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2003
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    5,384

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by T-storm chick View Post
    The Canadian and US dollar are currently about on par. (So close switching from one currency to another might save you $100 on a $10000 sale.)
    Regarding taxes...US buyers do not have to pay Federal GST (still 7% right? I haven't been home in a really long time!) Each province has different provincial tax, just like state sales tax in the US. Alberta has none. I believe if the seller arranges with a hauler to take the horse out of Canada no provincial tax needs be collected. In either case, if they collected tax from you, I believe you would be eligible for a refund.
    Only 5% now!
    Go Ahead: This is a dare, not permission. Don't Do It!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov. 30, 2010
    Posts
    36

    Default

    When we dealt with horses sold from Canada to the US, we needed health papers and coggins. They were done by our local vet and signed by the CFIA vet. We've done it twice (with two different local vets) and one time we had to take them to the CFIA vet to sign and the other time the vet's office handled the signing.

    These horses were sold so I can't advise about the trial period.

    When it comes to federal taxes (GST) I believe that if the seller can prove the horses left the country (ie, they arranged shipping), they don't have to collect/remit the GST. We don't have HST so I'm not sure how it would work in HST provinces. You might be able to apply for a refund as well.

    Good luck!



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2004
    Posts
    57

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by florida foxhunter View Post
    I just sold a horse TO someone in Canada. We had to get a different health certificate than we usually use, approved by the USDA for crossing the boarder. Although it may benefit you to convert US Dollars to Canadian dollars, I know the new owner had to pay a tax (I believe it was 14%) on the sale price to get him in the country.
    I assume they'd still tax the sale if the horse were leaving the country , so I'd plan and find out about that. Even if you don't pay it, it could be reflected in the sales price if the seller has to pay.

    I'm talking out of school on your specific question of IMPORTING a horse from Canada.......but just thought I'd offer this food for thought......... Good Luck!
    Would that be Coco?



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