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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 3, 2009
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    21

    Default New job offer - how to tell current boss

    I work in a small law office - solo practicioner - and I am the staff. I have a great deal of loyalty to my current boss, but have been offered a position with the local circuit court. My current boss just took over the practice from the attorney who retired at the end of the year. My current boss has been in the office for over 2 years but is an experience atty. I have no complaints about my new boss as my issues are about the just-retired atty.: no raises in over 3 years, he never contribute to my 401k & no health ins. being the more serious ones. My employer cannot afford to give me a raise at this time but has offered to provide me with a 401k and eventually health ins. We make a good team and work well together, especially as we try to figure out the files & accounts that she took over. I'm looking for a good way to break it to my current employer that I will be leaving her shortly and that it's not about her. Is there a good way to state this without making her feel that I betrayed her?
    "Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored." Aldous Huxley.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 15, 2008
    Posts
    2,770

    Default

    Well, going to a court is a great opportunity--i can't see her taking that personally. Try to give as much lead time as possible to help find/train your replacement. Good luck and congrats!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Gravity works, and the laws of physics are a bitch.

    Member: Rabid Garden Snail Clique


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 28, 2004
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    500

    Default

    Ditto what charisma said. A court job is a good one, and the attorney should understand. Just give as much notice as possible and offer to help train your replacement. If you have to leave before the replacement is trained, make sure the attorney knows that she and/or your replacement can call you with any questions.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 4, 2009
    Location
    NCC DE
    Posts
    2,274

    Default

    Write a nice professional letter of resignation. Say that you've accepted a position with the local court yada, yada. If you want to, mention that you've enjoyed working for her. Of course include the date you're leaving.

    Don't burn a bridge here, give her as much notice as you can and do it ASAP. Like tomorrow.

    Who knows, if she needs you bad enough she may find a way to make you a counter offer.

    Edited to add that I'm not suggesting you hand her the letter and run. The letter makes it official, certainly tell her what's going on when you give it to her.
    Last edited by mswillie; Feb. 24, 2013 at 05:28 PM. Reason: clarity (or lack thereof)


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
    Posts
    7,294

    Default

    I would tell her in person.

    No attorney is going to hold this against you. Just say it is too good an opportunity to pass up. She knows it is true, and I doubt will give you a hard time.

    Congratulations!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2005
    Location
    washington state
    Posts
    7,552

    Default

    It's not personal, it's a wise move on your part. You pay to play, she (or he?) can't afford the front row.

    Write a nice resignation letter and stay professional and helpful until the end, you keep your good rep
    The Knotted Pony

    Proud and upstanding member of the Snort and Blow Clique.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 9, 2004
    Posts
    216

    Default

    Since the office is so small, I would tell her in person, but hand her an official resignation letter at the same time. If you have enjoyed working with her, it is perfectly fine to state that in the letter. I would provide as much notice as you can, and offer to train your replacement during that period. As long as you remain professional (which includes providing her with sufficient notice), there should be no burned bridges.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2007
    Location
    Triangle Area, NC
    Posts
    6,709

    Default

    I don't recommend you do what I did. And that is celebrate the new position by drinking 4 appletinis and then cantering around the house in your pajamas, only to have a flying lead change go wrong and break your ankle. This will cause you to be a half day late to work... In schnazzy cut off pj pants hopped up on controlled substances, sobbing to your boss that you're moving on.
    Yeah, I know how to make an exit.
    www.destinationconsensusequus.com
    chaque pas est fait ensemble


    22 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2007
    Location
    Central NJ
    Posts
    1,050

    Default

    For one great boss.... I sent him a large flower arrangement and the card said "I quit"

    He was my reference and coach about getting the new job so it was not a big surprise.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2006
    Location
    At the back of the line
    Posts
    4,016

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Petstorejunkie View Post
    I don't recommend you do what I did. And that is celebrate the new position by drinking 4 appletinis and then cantering around the house in your pajamas, only to have a flying lead change go wrong and break your ankle. This will cause you to be a half day late to work... In schnazzy cut off pj pants hopped up on controlled substances, sobbing to your boss that you're moving on.
    Yeah, I know how to make an exit.
    Snort! This is 1 of the funnyest posts on OT ever!
    “Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.” Peter Drucker



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2005
    Location
    between the mountains and the sea, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,936

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Petstorejunkie View Post
    I don't recommend you do what I did. And that is celebrate the new position by drinking 4 appletinis and then cantering around the house in your pajamas, only to have a flying lead change go wrong and break your ankle. This will cause you to be a half day late to work... In schnazzy cut off pj pants hopped up on controlled substances, sobbing to your boss that you're moving on.
    Yeah, I know how to make an exit.

    ahahahahaha this is awesome. There have been some good laughs this OT day - I like this new trend :-P

    I definitely like the tell your boss & the same time as handing a letter. Obviously stay classy & responsible until leaving date. It probably says in your contract how much notice you have to give.

    I was in a slightly different situation, but may still be relevant. I found out I got into grad school in a different town 2 two days before classes started (long story!). I had a PT job & knew I would not be able to give notice. Luckily we worked shifts. Seasonal staff hadn't left yet and I knew there were more seasonal staff than full time jobs available. I called my manager straight away to let her know and handed a letter in the next day. They literally had a matter of days to make new staffing decisions so I wanted them to at least know informally as soon as possible. You should be able to decide based on your professional relationship with your boss which is the best way to go.
    "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
    "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun. 3, 2009
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    21

    Default

    Thanks for the well wishes and the idea about the letter. I plan on speaking with her on Monday. I hadn't thought about giving her a formal letter of resignation but it makes sense and it will help (I hope) us both move on. I have worked with this attorney for several years but she has been my employer for only 2 months. I have a lot of respect for her as a person & as an advocate for her clients. I'm more than willing to help her find my replacement and am open to being available after I leave. The court job is a bureauacratic, kinda paperpushing job & the pay isn't much more than I earn now, but the benefits it offers as well as some hope of advancement are what is best for my family.

    Petstore - that was one smoooth exit! Hope you healed up quickly. And Skyking - I envy your resignation letter as I wanted to do something similar to the attorney/boss who just retired but without the flowers, or maybe dead flowers :-)
    "Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored." Aldous Huxley.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2010
    Location
    Westford, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,631

    Default

    Since it's a tiny office, I would tell her in person and hand her the resignation letter in person. I've always told my boss verbally, along with the letter, even in bigger companies. I've been fortunate to have never had a boss I really hated!

    Something like:

    Dear Boss:

    I am writing to inform you that I am resigning my position of "XYZ Title", effective (some date). I have thoroughly enjoyed working with you, but have been offered a job that will help further my career plans.

    Thank you very much for the opportunity you have given me. I have learned a lot from you.

    I wish you best of luck with your practice.

    Sincerely,

    ___________

    When does the new job expect you to start? In a solo practitioner situation, your current boss will need to replace you right away. I'd give as much notice as you can. Two weeks is standard, but I've given as much as a month sometimes when the employer I was leaving was highly dependent on some specialized knowledge I had, that way I could get the replacement up and running before I left. If you DO go back to help her out on your own time, get a contract in place before doing any work. I did go back to help out a previous employer get through budget season (on the weekends) and we agreed, in writing, to an hourly rate beforehand and I invoiced them after each weekend I worked. My independent contractor rate was significantly more than what they'd been paying me in salary...partly because they were no longer paying my benefits, but largely because I didn't want them to call on me indefinitely and try to take advantage. The big dollar hourly rate encouraged them to move on and learn to do that specific work without me. Plus, it was a nice extra chunk of money to make up for giving up some weekends .


    2 members found this post helpful.

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