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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simkie View Post
    Treating with honey is really not that crazy:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23216146

    One of many studies that have been published.
    Wait, the wounds with Manuka Honey and Manuka Honey Gel healed faster than non treated wounds or wounds covered in manure??? Not much of a study, unless of course I'm missing something...


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  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Acertainsmile View Post
    Wait, the wounds with Manuka Honey and Manuka Honey Gel healed faster than non treated wounds or wounds covered in manure??? Not much of a study, unless of course I'm missing something...
    The tested items were: honey, honey gel, gel control and untreated. Honey shortened healing times.

    Here's a whole slew of additional studies for your perusal:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?...+healing+honey


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  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Acertainsmile View Post
    Honestly I would get a second opinion... A vet that perscribes honey for a wound leaves me scratching my head.
    But I have seen it work with a horse whose chest was wide open from an encounter with a car. The owners were very experienced horse people and first used cobwebs to stop the bleeding (amazing!). Then after the vet had come, they used honey to pack the wound (in the winter of course). The horse healed amazingly well and is back to doing his job pulling timber from the bush!!!



  4. #24
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    I'm not saying honey couldnt work, but I believe there may be better options. Oh, and the cobweb trick is way old school, learned that trick when I was a little kid from a man who had been in the Cavalry. Bacon grease works too, but there are newer better options. Placenta is supposably awesome, and I would try that for a serious wound. Knocks wood that I havent had to try it.


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  5. #25
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    amnion is supposed to work too and very well. The trick is to have some on hand, but it freezes well.


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  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by FalseImpression View Post
    amnion is supposed to work too and very well. The trick is to have some on hand, but it freezes well.
    Ah, thats what it is ... my vet swears by it and usually keeps some frozen! I did quite alot of research on it a few years ago when a friends horse degloved his rear leg.



  7. #27
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    OP--Way too soon! Have the vet back out, recheck the leg and get a long term plan going. 2 weeks is not long enough. Is he on stall rest? Is the wound infected, hot, pus leaking out? If it is clean and healing, then time and good care should bring him back around. Don't beat yourself up--dumb things happen to good people, too!

    A horse in our barn was badly injured last fall--puncture wound and skin removal on the inside of a hind leg, just below the hock. You could see tendon (sheath intact, thank goodness) and muscle--no skin remained in a 2 inch by 5 inch swath. Daily cleaning, antibiotics, stall rest, bandaging to we were all blue in the face. He is sound and being ridden again. The healing up hole is still there, still covered most of the time with a bandage, limited turn out (mostly in the indoor) to keep it clean, but the owners stuck it out and their boy is fine.
    Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!



  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Acertainsmile View Post
    Honestly I would get a second opinion... A vet that perscribes honey for a wound leaves me scratching my head.
    Honey is commonly used to treat infected wounds and can be very effective, as mentioned by others. There are commercial honey wound dressings available for horses and humans.
    Just because you aren't familiar with it doesn't mean it isn't a good option, or the best option for this case. It also has the added benefit of little pain associated with its application, and tends to be very gentle on healing tissue.
    *CrowneDragon*
    As Peter, Paul, and Mary say, a dragon lives forever.


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  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Acertainsmile View Post
    I'm not saying honey couldnt work, but I believe there may be better options. Oh, and the cobweb trick is way old school, learned that trick when I was a little kid from a man who had been in the Cavalry. Bacon grease works too, but there are newer better options. Placenta is supposably awesome, and I would try that for a serious wound. Knocks wood that I havent had to try it.
    Honey is far from some archaic, outdated folk remedy. It has been proven in real, actual published studies to be effective.

    Lumping it in with bacon fat is putting it in the wrong category.


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  10. #30
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    I personally have not ever used honey but I have seen the amazing results it has had for others.

    Jingles for your mother and your mother's horse.



  11. #31
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    OP:
    Please stop blaming yourself for the accident.
    DH used to say "That's why they call them 'accidents' - nobody sets out looking to make them happen"

    And I agree 2 weeks is not nearly enough time for a wound like you described to heal.
    I spent 8 months treating my horse who sloughed off half his sole from a bone bruise resulting in an abcess. He came through fine & returned to work.

    IIWM, I'd ask the vet about something stronger than Bute for pain, but then again, pain is a signal for the horse to not fully use the injured leg as it heals.

    For those questioning the use of honey - a longtime medical treatment for bedsores in humans has been the use of "sugardine" < granulated sugar mixed with iodine packed into the wound.
    Honey has natural antibiotic properties, so it makes sense to use in connection with treatment of a wound like the one described.
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009
    Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009



  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Acertainsmile View Post
    Honestly I would get a second opinion... A vet that perscribes honey for a wound leaves me scratching my head.
    My vet has used honey for years, especially for clients unwilling or unable to afford expensive alternatives.

    In hard to wrap places (ie stifles) it is a good topical - just think, when was the last time you saw honey go bad??



  13. #33
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    [QUOTE=2DogsFarm;6860042]OP:
    Please stop blaming yourself for the accident.
    DH used to say "That's why they call them 'accidents' - nobody sets out looking to make them happen". ( QUOTE)


    We have all done things we wish we could take back or re-do.
    I hope more than anything that you have learned that your horse should be tied while you groom, tack up and clean feet. Some lessons are learned the hard way and unfortunately your mom and her horse have learned it too.


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  14. #34
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    Sugardine is also used for foot abcesses - but if the infection, if it is infected, is more than skin deep you need something more powerful...and the right one.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique


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  15. #35
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    Very sorry about what happened, it isn't your fault though, accidents happen. That being said, it is WAY too early to give up on the stifle healing. Injuries like these take a long time to heal and lots of TLC. I would get a full diagnosis in terms of what is and what is not damaged as well as a treatment plan and prognosis before making any rash decisions.
    www.svhanoverians.com

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  16. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by candyappy View Post
    We have all done things we wish we could take back or re-do.
    I hope more than anything that you have learned that your horse should be tied while you groom, tack up and clean feet. Some lessons are learned the hard way and unfortunately your mom and her horse have learned it too.
    I hope so too, and I hope both your mother and her horse recover well and quickly.
    Quote Originally Posted by Linny View Post
    Those martingales were so taut, you could play Ode to Joy on them with a comb



  17. #37
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    OP, please don't beat yourself up. Could have, would have should have.....

    I had a JRT a few years back, details behind the incident I won't get in, but "I should have known better". He acted "odd" one night. I called the vet, described the incident and his signs, we made the decision not to take him it and watch him overnight. He seemed more like his old self, eating, pooping etc. Next morning he was dead. Gosh, did I beat myself up over it. Even with the vet, friends, family telling me "it's not your fault", the guilt is overwhelming.

    2 weeks is not enough time. Pain is there for a reason. I hope all goes well with the horse, your mom, and you. Take care.
    Come to the dark side, we have cookies



  18. #38
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    OP.. sounds like the perfect storm to me. And no, you are NOT to blame. Horses can and will hurt themselves, given the first opportunity.

    But please.. and I"m BEGGING you here: Get a new vet.



  19. #39
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    My vet has agreed to raw (unpasteurized) honey being used on a foal's skinned face to aid healing. It's not in replacement of antiobiotics, just a healing-agent.

    And it seemed to work very well.

    So absolutely, I would use it on a wound. Along with other proper care.
    *&*&*&*&*&*&*&*&*&*&*&*&*&*&*&
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  20. #40
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    I worry that the OP has not come back. I hope she has been reading though and have delayed putting the horse down.



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