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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO
    Posts
    15,858

    Default Footing inside a run in shed

    Disclaimer: I board and I have no idea about this sort of thing! Would appreciate if you all could speak slowly and use small words.

    We clean the run in shed in the field our horses live in regularly, and I've noticed we're getting some gaps between the bottom of the shed and the ground. I think it's just sort of standard loss of dirt. I do not believe that there was ever anything put down as footing in the shed...I think it was just placed on a pad of leveled dirt.

    What do you all use as footing for your run in sheds? Horses are barefoot, have a total of about seven acres to hang out on, and do pee in there. There is no bedding.

    Ideas? I'd like to have some sort of knowledge about the subject before we chat with the barn owners



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 26, 2008
    Posts
    715

    Default

    I have tried a BUNCH of different options over the years ( gravel, mats, dirt, sand, bedding, no bedding)

    The best has been : deep bed of sand.

    It is not slippery, nice to lay down in, easy to clean, drains ok (for the committed pee out of the wind kind), cheap and easy to replenish. When mixed with manure it is a fine additive to my (naturally non-sandy) soil. My horses are not fed in the shed except once in a great while.

    This year I tried corn stubble on top - they LOVED it, but ate most of it while/between napping on it.
    Horses should be trained in such a way that they not only love their riders, but look forward to the time they are with them.
    ~ Xenophon, 350 B.C.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
    Posts
    11,701

    Default

    Limestone screenings, covered up by sand. The limestone will compress after getting wet and fill in the gaps. The sand is comfy.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
    Posts
    8,795

    Default

    I know lots of people that put no footing down at all, don't prepare the site, and they have a 50/50 success rate of a comfortable run in versus a mud pit with a roof. I had the latter as a teen and installed a raised wooden stall floor, we had the problem because there was a slope and water was directed into the run in to drain. Had the problem here for the same reason and did some trenching to help reduce the issue, in one structure we have no problem at all as there is no drainage into it, neither have horses.
    We are putting up a proper shedrow/open front stall run in and it will have perimeter footers on rock (we have lots of rocks), then a bed of several layers of size and DH is wanting to finish off with sand.
    What you do sort of depends on whether it's pole constructed or sitting on a perimeter foundation. Our next doors never put any footing in at all in their pole barn and had water intrusion and wind until the guy brought soil in and banked it against the outside of the metal building. The footing inside is actually the native limestone bedrock exposed, with some dirt on top here and there.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 22, 2006
    Location
    SF Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    1,784

    Default

    Good advice already given. We put down baserock first - class 2 then class 4, then what we call engineered-fill (probably like screenings or stone dust?) and then stall mats in the stalls and all around the entry.

    Our horses are fed 100% of the time in there, and they hang out in there often, even though it opens out into pasture. (well, pasture in CA is mostly dry lot)

    Anyways - it sounds like you could back fill the dirt with some sort of crushed rock - depending on your area - crushed/screened/dust etc. Or even sand as others have said. Depends on your area and what materials are available (and cost)

    Here's a pic of ours.

    http://i279.photobucket.com/albums/k...20120-1204.jpg

    http://i279.photobucket.com/albums/k...10710-0746.jpg

    I made sure they had lots of other areas to pee and lay down. So they only eat in the stall shelters, and hang out under there when it rains (we don't get much "weather" out here They also have old-grown CA Oak trees in the pasture too.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Equine & Pet Portrait Artist
    www.elainehickman.com
    **Morgans Do It All**



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2004
    Location
    Piedmont Triad, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,028

    Default

    Just placed a good layer of sandrock (very economical sandlike dirt) in our runin. Was easy to pick manure from and allows urine to drain.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO
    Posts
    15,858

    Default

    Thanks for the ideas!

    Some more information:

    The run in is a metal porta-shed type thing, anchored to the ground. It sits on a leveled dirt pad, and our soil here in Colorado is clay.

    One horse is locked in part of the run in twice a day to eat her grain. She's fed in a pan on the ground, occasionally knocks it over, and paws sometimes when she's done and ready to come out. Otherwise horses are fed outside, barring some particularly nasty or windy days.

    The run in is only cleaned 3-4 times a week when we do it. The horses do poop and pee in there.

    We've not been at this barn in the wet season, so not sure how it handles water. It's a little elevated, so hopefully it will not turn into a muddy mess. It IS windy, and sometimes that wind blows into the shed.

    Looking at the shed now, we probably need 4-5 inches of fill to bring the base up to the top of the bottom cross braces, which is about where I'd want it.

    So, given all that, sand? Some sort of harder, more durable base, and then sand? Something else?

    And if sand, what sort of sand? The roundish beach sand or something more angular?

    I would love to do mats, but that's probably not feasible.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
    Posts
    6,854

    Default

    I have clay and use what around here they call "screenings" made out of crushed concrete in my run-in. It's not as tiny particle-wise as sand, but no big pieces either. It is much nicer than the clay and stays nice all winter. I do feed hay in there sometimes but in raised cinchchix nets so the horses are not eating off the ground. I've been very pleased with it and refill it once a year to the tune of about $150.

    We did not use any kind of base -- over time the stone packs decently. It is a good mix of neither deep nor hard. They like to sleep in it so it must be pleasant to the horses too.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 7, 2008
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    524

    Default

    Our base is bluestone and then we put in rubber mats making it just like a stall. Horses seem to love hanging out in the run-in to be out of bad weather or when they need shade during hot months. We have feeders and hay racks in the sheds but only use them during bad winter storms. We've been doing this for about 3 years now and have not had any problems with the mats being in firm and correct. The horses prefer to lay in the sun out in the pastures which they have full access to, however, we also made a paddock around the run-ins in case they needed to be used for a horse in rehab with limited areas to move or if we "knock on wood" had a major ice storm. So far so good. The horses out in the pastures with sheds also have stalls in the barn if needed but they prefer to be outside. Hope this helps.

    Also with having the mats firmly in place it gives us a choice to put bedding down if needed and make it easy to keep clean.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 6, 2004
    Location
    Elkton
    Posts
    4,352

    Default

    Before I put in my shed (which is actually more like a shedrow because it can be closed into stalls) I had an excavator dig below the frost line, put down geotextile fabric (you can find it cheap) and then do crush and run (I think that's what it's called). Then we put the barn on it and put down thick rubber mats. It's worked wonderfully and is super easy to clean out, but the initial set up was expensive.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2011
    Location
    Cynthiana KY (~40 min. NE of Lexington)
    Posts
    492

    Default

    I'm just curious, for all the people who said sand as the top layer, do your horses eat in there? Either hay or grain? Do you have mats down where they eat or do they eat right off the sand? I'd be worried about sand colic. I've never had problems with sand colic myself, since we have clay soil here, but know it can be a major problem in areas with sandy soil.

    That being said, my favorite run in shed had stone dust (bluestone) for the footing with stallmats in the heavy traffic areas like around the hay feeders and the waterer. It was a huge shed, more like an open barn, but thehorses loved it and it was really easy to clean.

    Sheila
    Sheila Zeltt
    Chestnut Run Stable & Zeltt Racing Stable
    www.Zeltt.com
    Standing "Tiz Brian" at Stud, 16.1 h bay TB by Tiznow



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2011
    Posts
    24

    Default

    Meredith Clark - Where did you get cheap geotextile fabric? My jaw dropped when I saw the price of it at Lowes.
    which type did you use? the landscape fabric seems to be less expensive but I am not sure it will do what we want?
    Last edited by luvmyapp; Feb. 27, 2013 at 06:46 AM. Reason: add question



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 13, 2009
    Posts
    240

    Default

    i have a wood floor in my shelter and i bed it lightly, easy to clean



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun. 22, 2006
    Location
    SF Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    1,784

    Default

    I use old/removed/free/remnant carpets as my "geotextile fabric"

    can't get cheaper than that!

    Quote Originally Posted by luvmyapp View Post
    Meredith Clark - Where did you get cheap geotextile fabric? My jaw dropped when I saw the price of it at Lowes.
    which type did you use? the landscape fabric seems to be less expensive but I am not sure it will do what we want?
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Equine & Pet Portrait Artist
    www.elainehickman.com
    **Morgans Do It All**


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May. 25, 2005
    Location
    best place so far
    Posts
    1,038

    Default

    I have four run-in sheds. Two have screenings as the base and stay 90% dry. In really blowing storms it will get wet in there, but not muddy. I do have to put in some more screenings every other year or so to keep it really nice.

    My two other run ins have wood slat floors that are filled in with screenings. This is the best set up I have ever used or seen for run ins. I am probably going to do a terrible job explaining how I did this but here it goes...I bought 10ft pressure treated 2X4s. I then laid then down in their short sides, one after the other with small 2X4 spaces between each board. i.e.; 2" board-2"space-2"board-2" space-etc. When finished with this stage the floor of the runin looked like a teak wood slat floor (similar to this but all the boards were in one direction):

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Grade-A-Teak...-/300712692764

    I then went and filled all the spaces with screenings. These runs stay bone dry as they are raised 4" (the height of the 2X4s), never have to repack with footings as it doesn't "disappear" into the ground and is not slippery like rubber mats can be when wet.

    When I have the time and energy I will do the remaining two the same way. I t is easy to do...did the first two all on my own and I am no carpenter Just takes time and energy. Hope I explained that well!
    Read about my time at the Hannoveraner Verband Breeders Courses:
    http://blumefarm.com/hannoveranercourse2011.html
    http://blumefarm.com/hannoveranercourse2012.html


    2 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2012
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    1,944

    Default

    We bordered ours with a RR tie type border then filled with 3/4 minus crushed rock. It has been terrific. No worry about sand colic, packs down and does not dribble out, drains well and very easy to clean. They have liked it fine for the past seven years! Have stall mats on concrete back east...the mats are good for concrete but cleaning and bleaching, ugh!



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
    Posts
    5,479

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Blume Farm View Post
    I have four run-in sheds. Two have screenings as the base and stay 90% dry. In really blowing storms it will get wet in there, but not muddy. I do have to put in some more screenings every other year or so to keep it really nice.

    My two other run ins have wood slat floors that are filled in with screenings. This is the best set up I have ever used or seen for run ins. I am probably going to do a terrible job explaining how I did this but here it goes...I bought 10ft pressure treated 2X4s. I then laid then down in their short sides, one after the other with small 2X4 spaces between each board. i.e.; 2" board-2"space-2"board-2" space-etc. When finished with this stage the floor of the runin looked like a teak wood slat floor (similar to this but all the boards were in one direction):

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Grade-A-Teak...-/300712692764

    I then went and filled all the spaces with screenings. These runs stay bone dry as they are raised 4" (the height of the 2X4s), never have to repack with footings as it doesn't "disappear" into the ground and is not slippery like rubber mats can be when wet.

    When I have the time and energy I will do the remaining two the same way. I t is easy to do...did the first two all on my own and I am no carpenter Just takes time and energy. Hope I explained that well!
    So I calculated this out for a 14 x 20 foot run and if I did my math right I would need 84 boards at $5.17 a piece--so about $450 with tax plus the gravel to fill (which I don't know a $ on). I wonder how this compares cost-wise to some of the other ideas? Anyone know what they would pay to do 4" of straight gravel or crusher run?
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO
    Posts
    15,858

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TrotTrotPumpkn View Post
    So I calculated this out for a 14 x 20 foot run and if I did my math right I would need 84 boards at $5.17 a piece--so about $450 with tax plus the gravel to fill (which I don't know a $ on). I wonder how this compares cost-wise to some of the other ideas? Anyone know what they would pay to do 4" of straight gravel or crusher run?
    I found this price list for a company that's close-ish to me: http://apclandscape.us.com/price_list.php

    I found on another website that a ton is roughly equal to 18 cu ft or 0.67 cu yds.

    I appreciate all the suggestions and the continued discussion. Since we're boarding now, whatever we do (or talk to the barn about) is really going to be limited to some sort of fill, but I love the ideas on the wood floors and mats--will file those for when we get our own place



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr. 6, 2004
    Location
    Elkton
    Posts
    4,352

    Default

    I got mine from a company that does geo engineering for corp construction. Basically i got it from the wholesale seller. My dad owns an architecture firm so he gave me the contact. If you can find a contractor I bet they could help you!

    Quote Originally Posted by luvmyapp View Post
    Meredith Clark - Where did you get cheap geotextile fabric? My jaw dropped when I saw the price of it at Lowes.
    which type did you use? the landscape fabric seems to be less expensive but I am not sure it will do what we want?


    1 members found this post helpful.

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