The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 24
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2003
    Location
    Wet and Windy Washington
    Posts
    3,793

    Default Insurance and having a friends horse on the property?

    So i'm looking to rent out the MIL on my property and a friend is very interested and she has a horse.

    I have a couple questions,

    1) I can 'up' her rent and let her horse stay there for 'free'. My thinking being that I'm then not boarding for insurance reasons.

    2) if its only one horse does my insurance actually change?

    3) who on earth do I talk to about all of this, my home insurance company or one of the horse insurance folks I see in the back of magazines?
    I have horse to sell to you. Horse good for riding. Can pull cart. Horse good size. Eats carrots and apples. Likes attention. Move head to music. No like opera! You like you buy.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
    Posts
    9,495

    Default

    You're renting out your Mother In Law?? Sign me up, I need to get something out of caring for the old lady!

    If this is a mobile home, then you need to talk to whoever holds your current homeowner's because horse or not you now have a rental property. Start there.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2010
    Posts
    2,201

    Default

    yeah, when I bought my place my home insurance made sure several times that the horses on the property were mine and that I was not boarding, so while I don't know the significance, there clearly is one at least in my state. I think it's a completely different ballgame if the horse that gets loose and causes a car wreck from your property is not your horse.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2003
    Location
    Wet and Windy Washington
    Posts
    3,793

    Default

    Thanks I guess I'll call and ask, kinda hate for the insurance to go up for one horse

    Its not a mobile home its an apartment above my husbands garage if that makes any difference.
    I have horse to sell to you. Horse good for riding. Can pull cart. Horse good size. Eats carrots and apples. Likes attention. Move head to music. No like opera! You like you buy.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 6, 2000
    Location
    SE Mass
    Posts
    4,228

    Default

    Farm Family insurance has affordable policies for small boarding operations (1-5 horses). Not sure about the human renter though.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2007
    Location
    Gettysburg, PA
    Posts
    2,638

    Default

    I would chat with an agent and find out. Both having a rental and someone's horse. Like another poster, my insurance made sure we were not taking in other horses. Not only do you have to worry about that person, but anyone they bring over and if they get injured
    Epona Farm
    Irish Draughts and Irish Sport horses

    Join us on Facebook



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,580

    Default

    it is not in your best interest to hide what's *really* going on from your insurer. When your liability exposure increases, then yes that sometimes means your premiums do also. The alternative is not having the coverage you need for what's *really* going on.

    Even if you hide the boarding costs in rent, bartering, etc, you are still providing a commercial service-- which will be easily sussed out by your insurer or in court if there's some kind of loss connected with the boarding situation.
    Not to mention keeping the boarding on the down-low would mean not having a written boarding agreement, and I think we all know how that can turn out.
    Try to break down crushing defeats into smaller, more manageable failures. It’s also helpful every now and then to stop, take stock of your situation, and really beat yourself up about it.The Onion


    2 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2004
    Location
    Piedmont Triad, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,380

    Default

    The renter could sell the horse to you. The agreement could include a clause that she has the right to buy it back at the same price in a certain time. Then it's your horse and if she doesn't keep her end of the bargain, you can sell the horse without having to go through stableman's lien.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
    Posts
    9,495

    Default

    Oh, duh, MIL unit. Rats.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    12,751

    Default

    Have you gotten insurance to cover the fact that you are renting out the apartment (though the thought that you were renting out your MIL sounded much more giggle worthy)?



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2004
    Location
    Whidbey Is, Wash.
    Posts
    9,878

    Default

    Can you require she get liability insurance on her horse? Not dismissing for need for modifying your insurance, but that does help and I've read about it before.

    I have thinking about looking into it for my horse and the donk. Reason being is I am moving them to a training barn, and they'll be getting "touched" twice a day for turn-in and -out. Where they are now, the BO can do everything without ever touching any of the critters. While neither of mine are dangerous (per se), they are horses.

    I'm also interested because when our house sells, DH wants to find rental property where we can bring his mares...I wonder about the insurance side of that.
    COTH's official mini-donk enabler

    "I am all for reaching out, but in some situations it needs to be done with a rolled up news paper." Alagirl



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 6, 2007
    Location
    Napanee ON
    Posts
    4,332

    Default

    Yes, tell your broker/agent. Mine went up about $7 a year for one boarder. You really need to make sure you are covered for the rental too. If you have a claim and these things are not disclosed, your claim even if unrelated can be denied.

    Ensure your tenant carries personal liability insurance too, which they can get from a Tenants package. An equine liability policy will also protect them if they have any issues with their own horse. That type of coverage they can usually get from an organization like what OEF has here in Ontario.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    May. 6, 2007
    Location
    Napanee ON
    Posts
    4,332



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 24, 2002
    Location
    Northern KY
    Posts
    4,480

    Default It will make your insurance go up.

    If you tell them. If you don't I hope you have piles of money. Because....
    Something will go wrong....

    It will be your fault and you won't have a friend any more, you'll have a Plaintiff.

    Add the increase in insurance to her rent and tell your agent that while you are not running a "boarding" business, but you do need care, custody and control.

    Just in case.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2003
    Location
    Wet and Windy Washington
    Posts
    3,793

    Default

    Not trying to hide or decieve anyone just don't want to suddenly up my insurance for one horse (although if its $7 thats fine!!!)

    Just looking for the cheapest way to make sure everything is covered.

    Thanks for the info though will be sure to talk to my insurance company before I go forward with anything! (still a couple months away).
    I have horse to sell to you. Horse good for riding. Can pull cart. Horse good size. Eats carrots and apples. Likes attention. Move head to music. No like opera! You like you buy.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar. 20, 2011
    Posts
    108

    Default

    Make sure that you can legally rent out the unit (is it allowed on your deed/per county code), before even renting it, let alone having a horse. Your insurance may be null and void if you illegally rent, in the first place.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2009
    Posts
    2,160

    Default

    Add me to the list that says talk to your insurance agent in detail about the situation to make sure you have adequate coverage. Believe me, unfortunate things can--and will--happen. Having rented out "on farm" living spaces before, I can tell you there are a lot of possible complicating issues. Whether you specifically accept cash money for boarding the horse or not, I think it would be immediately apparent to anyone examining the situation that you aren't keeping the horse for free, so I wouldn't try to pretend otherwise.

    You may need coverage for commercial boarding (though some companies I believe will roll a smaller # of boarded horses into a homeowner's policy). You also may need Care, Custody and Control insurance that would protect you if the boarded horse was injured or killed due to your negligence. I think you would also be well served to have a hold harmless release signed by your boarder and any guests who may handle the horse, just as any normal boarding business would require.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2003
    Location
    Cocoa, Fla
    Posts
    4,227

    Default

    When I rented out our property (house, barn, etc.) we had it written into the renters agreement that no one but family could keep/ride their horses on the farm. That way if they tried to rent out a stall, let someone ride who got hurt, etc... it was on their head.
    Sandy in Fla.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
    Posts
    5,914

    Default

    Yes, disclose all to your agent and plan for the worst while you hope for the best. I was sued by a BFF once. Keep in mind whatever goes wrong doesn't even have to be remotely your fault or something you controlled to *get* you sued...you still have to get yourself out of the mess, even if you're not at fault or they were doing something stupid.
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2003
    Location
    Wet and Windy Washington
    Posts
    3,793

    Default

    AGHH you are all making not want to rent now

    trouble is, it will be a nice bit of extra income so....

    Long term plan is to put up a barn and have 4 boarders but thats a few years off I think.
    I have horse to sell to you. Horse good for riding. Can pull cart. Horse good size. Eats carrots and apples. Likes attention. Move head to music. No like opera! You like you buy.



Similar Threads

  1. Daydreaming: How to turn new property into horse property?
    By Heliodoro in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: Nov. 21, 2012, 03:32 PM
  2. semi-HR - property insurance etc
    By carol_okc in forum Off Course
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: Apr. 8, 2012, 09:06 AM
  3. Renting our horse property
    By Leroy Brown in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: Aug. 14, 2010, 04:09 PM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: Aug. 10, 2010, 10:23 AM
  5. Looking at a horse property in the winter
    By pony89 in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: Dec. 10, 2009, 08:18 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness