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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2013
    Location
    Broken Bow, Ok
    Posts
    16

    Question feed mixing questions for a poor horse.

    Hey guys. Hope someone here can give me some advice! I was given a horse for my birthday. Me and my wife both had seen pictures of the horse but apparently they were some old pictures because when we got to the mans house and saw her we loaded her and got her out of there as soon as we could! I had asked the guy when was the last time she had been dewormed and he said he had never dewormed her and that he didn't know he had to deworm horses. And through the winter all he had been giving her to eat was some untreated, unfertilized cheap hay. She is do skinny you can see her shoulder blades! Okay now to my questions. I purchased some rice bran, alfalfa pellets, and some Start to finish Cool Calories 100.. I asked a friend and he said I also needed to mix with sweet feed, the rice bran and the fat supplement are both powder-like in consistency so the sweet feed would probably help since the rice bran and fat supplement would stick to it. But my main concern is will this be too much for her body to handle? And if it is or isn't I still need to know how much I should give her a day and what I should change to my recipe?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2011
    Posts
    1,719

    Default

    Yes, this is definitely potentially too much for her to handle. Start with free choice grass hay for a couple weeks. As much as she'll eat. After the first couple weeks, slowly add the alfalfa pellets. Then add the rice bran. I bet you won't need the Cool Calories, but I do like the product.

    I wouldn't deworm her right off the bat depending how skinny she is.

    I would avoid the sweet feed. Horses don't typically do well with a ton of sugar unless they are doing a significant amount of work (polo, endurance, upper level anything).



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2012
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    86

    Default

    May I add a heartfelt Thank You to you and your wife for not turning your backs on this horse. So many people would

    I agree with the above poster. That's the way I do it too. In addition to GOOD grass hay and plenty of clean water, a mineral block will also be a good thing.

    If you haven't yet, a vet call would be in order for vacs and teeth check. If the mouth is compromised in any way (I.e. hooks cutting cheek) the poor thing will have a terrible time eating anything, especially hay.

    If the horse hasn't been wormed, teeth not floated, nor hooves farriered then there is A definite possibility for discomfort or pain which may also be a reason for a horse not thriving.

    Do you have pics to share? Old or new? What breed is she? How tall? That info would help us help you help her

    Good luck and thank you for caring. I hope she turns out to be your heart horse.
    Last edited by HorsesRMyTherapy; Feb. 22, 2013 at 09:18 AM. Reason: Poor grammar
    HRMT



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2008
    Location
    now in KCMO, and plan to stay there
    Posts
    2,994

    Default

    This is weird, I just posted something and it went poof. When you do the search recommeneded for refeeding syndrome, you will find this info:
    "According to Dr. Carolyn Stull, PhD the re-feeding recommendations are as follows (RioVista Products):

    Days 1-3
    Feed one pound (@ 1/6 of a flake) of leafy alfalfa every four hours for a total of six pounds per day divided into six feedings. Contact a vet to evaluate
    the medical status of the horse.

    Days 4-10
    Slowly increase the amount of alfalfa and decrease the number of feedings so that by day six, you are feeding just over four pounds of hay every eight
    hours (total of 13 pounds per day in 3 feedings)

    Days 10 – several months
    Feed as much alfalfa as the horse will eat and decrease feeding to twice a day. Provide access to a salt block. Do not feed grain or supplemental
    materials until the horse is well along in his recovery; early feeding of grain and supplemental material complicates the return of normal metabolic
    function and can result in death.

    *Provide clean, fresh water at all times.
    *De-worming and correction of dental problems are very beneficial to the horse’s recovery.

    The main thing is, alfalfa hay right now, do not start feeding grain yet.

    ETA, I found out why I could not see my other reply. There are two identical threads, see http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/sh...r-a-poor-horse
    Jeanie
    RIP Sasha, best dog ever, pictured shortly before she died, Death either by euthanasia or natural causes is only the end of the animal inhabiting its body; I believe the spirit lives on.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2013
    Location
    Broken Bow, Ok
    Posts
    16

    Default

    http://i1322.photobucket.com/albums/...ps1ec88308.jpg
    before picture when she was healthy.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2013
    Location
    Broken Bow, Ok
    Posts
    16



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2013
    Location
    Broken Bow, Ok
    Posts
    16

    Default

    She is 16 hands tall, quarter horse, bay mare. About 8 years old.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2012
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    86

    Default

    Oh My . Well, I'll agree that she needs some extensive TLC. A vet call soon would be a good thing. Farrier as well.

    She was lovely, and will be again thanks to your generosity We'll be looking forward to updates, so don't wander off now LOL

    Speaking of which, and this is really none of my business but.....tying a horse to a movable object can have really scary results. please be careful.

    Btw, nice toys, did you mean for that last one to be public?
    Hey, I just realized - you have duplicate posts on this subject! Perhaps the mods will combine them so we have a cohesive convo going?
    HRMT


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2013
    Location
    Broken Bow, Ok
    Posts
    16

    Default

    Yes she is showing improvements daily. A farrier came over Friday and trimmed up her feet. I have a guy going to come sometime next month to check her teeth to see if they are properly floated. And a vet is gonna come out and run some blood work to screen for coggins, westnile, etc. Lol on the tying her to my truck. I could fire off a bazooka behind this horse and she would just look at the pretty fireball it would make wherever it hit haha. But yeah in most cases that could be bad. How do I go about getting the mods to fix that?



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