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  1. #21
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    I didn't know there was a disorder for it, I thought I was just really bad with numbers lol. Seriously as soon as I start hearing numbers of any kind, my brain completely shuts down. On standardized tests in school, I used to score in the top 1% of the country in every subject, but in math, I was in the bottom 40%.
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  2. #22
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    I have a similar story to just about everyone else on this thread. I was always able to get by in Math during high school because I had a terrier-like work ethic, and I would not give up on a subject until I understood the material. But jeez, it was pretty awful.

    If learning the material is really important to you check out this website: http://www.khanacademy.org/ This one guy is basically re-writing the book on math education. A lot of talent-less math students have really flowered in this program. Oh and it's totally free, and very comprehensive.



  3. #23
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    c'est moi, I was just going to mention Kahn Academy. It's a pretty wonderful tool for math and science.

    I can't emphasize enough how important testing can be to solving your difficulties. Once you know you strengths and weaknesses, you can work around them. Much of math difficulty for women is, unfortunately, cultural. You know, "math is hard for girls."
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    3 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
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    Math in our society today is taught with a focus towards calculation and algebra. But that isn't the only way to think about math. The Greeks, Indians and Egyptians had very different approaches to math. There are branches of mathematics (like set theory) that are a lot more about relations than calculations.

    I tutor kids with ADD in math. When they struggle with an idea, I try to demonstrate something similar but different. For instance, with fractions, I teach them Egyptian fractions and cooking.

    I started to read about math history and learned a lot about how some of these ideas were formed and the controversy and debate of integrating ideas into what we think of today as "math". It taught me that though I scramble number orders around in my head, I am actually really good at math. It is really just a form of language.

    Check this out.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1E7I7_r3Cw
    Last edited by nhwr; Feb. 22, 2013 at 06:28 PM.
    See those flying monkeys? They work for me.



  5. #25
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    I don't know that it's a learning disorder, but I have always struggled with math. I can sit down with an algebra book and work though the problems if I have help. I'll feel like I truly "get it", but then the next morning *poof*, it's gone and I feel like I'm starting from square one. I get math, but I don't seem to retain it. It took me until 7th grade to figure out long division, but one day it just clicked.

    This has held me back in a lot of ways. I took algebra 3 times in high school. After tons of private tutoring my district finally waived the requirement to allow me to graduate. I always wanted to be a meteorologist, but there is no way I can survive the math requirements.
    "Is it ignorance or apathy? Hey, I don't know and I don't care." ~Jimmy Buffett



  6. #26
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    I finally figured out for myself after all these years that there is such a thing as dyscalcula and that I have a mild form of it. I never did well in math at school, but my general intelligence seemed to make up for it and get me through high school maths. In college, I took guts like "Science and Theology" to get around math and science requirements. In law school, there was no math so, I was okay.

    I could never get my checkbook to balance or do any simple arithmetic reliably. I finally found out that I had a learning disability in the last decade or so when I described my propensity to transpose phone numbers to someone who knew about learning disabilities. (If you tell me your phone number verbally and I write it down a few seconds later, I am guaranteed to transpose at least one number.)

    Based on what I see students getting today for reasonable accommodations because of their learning disabilities, I think that you should get a proper diagnosis and maybe some accommodations can be made. The biggest one is MORE TIME. I know that if I had been aware of my propensity to transpose numbers, and was allowed the time to thoroughly check my work before passing it in, I would have done better in math based courses.
    "Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain" ~Friedrich Schiller



  7. #27
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    I don't know that transposing numbers means someone is not good at math.
    I have to pay attention to that, so I don't get numbers scrambled and 8 and 0 look alike if I don't watch it or they are where they can make sense either one of them, but still do ok at most math.
    Working some problem, it may look like an 8 but I know it is supposed to be a 0 and that is what I assume.
    More random figures, like keeping books and adding expenses, where numbers can be most anything if I don't remember what that item cost, there I tend to at times make mistakes seeing/writing the right number.

    My point, transposing numbers is not really that simple a problem, I don't think, but can be more situational.

    On learning styles, in post #10 there is in that last link a learning style test.

    I tried that twice and it was interesting to see that, contrary to what I expected, my lowest score was intra-personal, since I like so much to work alone.
    There are some categories that seem a bit contrived to fit as a learning style, like the "naturalistic" one.

    The scores were from top to bottom:
    Linguistics: 92%
    Logic-Math: 94%
    Visual-Spatial: 75%
    Intra-personal: 6%
    Interpersonal: 75%
    Musical: 63%
    Bodily-Kines.: 8%
    Naturalistic: 67%

    I wonder what others results may be?

    Those with math problems that may or not be real problems, how would that simple test define those?
    Try that and see what we come up with.



  8. #28
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    Default THIS!

    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    My daughter does. Go to your college students with disabilities department. Many colleges offer testing and you can receive extra help...time, use of a calculator etc.

    We had my daughter tested in high school. She said to multiply she had to visualize the multiplication table in her head to figure out the answer. No working memory either. You can do it...she has a 4.0.


    This! I work in a college disabilities department, and we offer a large variety of support to students with documented learning disabilities. If you don't have current documentation they should be able to tell you where to go to be evaluated. I would give them a call and they should at least be able to give you more information. It is actually federally mandated that they provide you with "accommodations" too.
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  9. #29
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    Jun. 7, 2004
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    I myself have a Learning Disabitly. I cant do math very well. I can read very well,My eyesight well im blind in my left eye and my right im 20/60? So Im leagally blind by the state.



  10. #30
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    It took me until college to realize that I am actually able to do math and do it right. Before that, I was in advanced, accelerated, AP, et cetera classes for language, history, et cetera, but in remedial math. I was SO embarrassed, especially because my dad was an engineer and I could feel his disappointment in me. I got Cs and even Ds in math classes up until my junior year of college.

    What it took was first a professor who drove everybody else crazy with his teaching style. He explained every step of every process. When he demonstrated problems, he wrote out every step. Even the little tiny ones. The people in the class who were already good at math were bored out of their skulls, but suddenly I was LEARNING. I was the best student in the class. MATH class. I was utterly shocked, until I realized that so many math teachers teach math because they're good at it. To them, going from y = mx + b to 15 was as easy as breathing ... for me, it was like getting spun around. So someone who went through every. little. thing. helped immensely.

    The other thing that helped was -- don't laugh -- using a particular kind of graph paper. I use that yellowish-green 5-squares-per-inch engineer's paper to do math. It helps change the mechanics of how I look at things physically, and I don't transpose as often. It also, just by being graph paper, encourages me to think more logically, more ... yknow, in squares, if that makes sense. Maybe that would help you?

    Now that I'm an adult, I actually would like to take more math classes, see how I can do now that I understand how I learn math and am willing to chase down the help I need.
    Nanakorobi yaoki: Seven times fall, eight times rise.
    http://reveilleandrinsie.blogspot.com



  11. #31
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    Just to add what has been said, I can not do math, but I do well in English and language. My math is so bad that I burst into tears in a math exam and walked out (I was 38 and finishing up college.) My husband can add numbers in his head, but barely passed French and English 101! I wish I could have had help when I was in college, I struggled a lot.
    RIP Kelly 1977-2007 "Wither thou goest, so shall I"

    "To tilt when you should withdraw is Knightly too."



  12. #32
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    When I was a child my parents took me to every doctor they could as I was off the charts with my reading, written and verbal skills - however I was barely functioning with math, to the point that I was failing it every year.

    I went to after school tutors, got extra help in school and studied my brains out for every test.... And I only ever passed due to the kindness of my teachers bumping me to just a passing grade as I worked so hard.

    I am currently an honors graduate with multiple diplomas and working on a degree, and yet I am barely at a 6th grade math level. I did very well in school and excelled at everytjing that didn't involve math! I don't know why but I just don't 'get' numbers



  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReveilleandRinsie View Post
    It took me until college to realize that I am actually able to do math and do it right. Before that, I was in advanced, accelerated, AP, et cetera classes for language, history, et cetera, but in remedial math. I was SO embarrassed, especially because my dad was an engineer and I could feel his disappointment in me. I got Cs and even Ds in math classes up until my junior year of college.

    What it took was first a professor who drove everybody else crazy with his teaching style. He explained every step of every process. When he demonstrated problems, he wrote out every step. Even the little tiny ones. The people in the class who were already good at math were bored out of their skulls, but suddenly I was LEARNING. I was the best student in the class. MATH class. I was utterly shocked, until I realized that so many math teachers teach math because they're good at it. To them, going from y = mx + b to 15 was as easy as breathing ... for me, it was like getting spun around. So someone who went through every. little. thing. helped immensely.
    The exact same thing happened to me in high school. I transferred to another school in the middle of the year and I went from barely passing math to becoming the literal top student in the class. My new teacher explained every. single. boring. step. of a problem in a very logical manner, and it turned out that was all I needed to "get it".

    I wonder if a lot of "bad" math students are really just people who aren't very good at inferring mathematical steps when they are learning how to do problems.
    Last edited by c'est moi; Feb. 22, 2013 at 10:36 PM.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  14. #34
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    Feb. 21, 2013
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    Reveille- I would LOVE a professor like that. My current professor is great. He obviously has a passion for what he is doing and he enjoys teaching. He's really engaging, and when he's up in the front of the room, he talks us through everything to the point it seems so simple. I think if he just read the exam problem aloud and said "So now what do I do?" I might actually get it. (Probably not, but anyhow...) Problem is that because he loves math and because he is passionate about it, he skips steps. I try to fill in the blanks with the theory behind what he is doing, but sometimes it doesn't work so well. I'll also try the graph paper- that's a good suggestion!

    Thanks also to whomever suggested Kahn Academy- I'll definitely check that out also.

    I feel a little better about things now that I'm 24 hours away from that hellacious exam. I'm in pre-calculus now, which I scraped through during the process of attaining my first degree. I now need to go through calc 2 plus some extra algebra classes for my current degree. So I really, really, really need to learn this stuff cold. It's just frustrating when after 8 hours of studying in one day alone, plus going to tutoring sessions on campus, plus "whiteboard tutoring" online, plus watching videos of how to solve the problems... I still flunked. (I have never studied that much for ANYTHING in my life- high school, college, grad school, EVER.)


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #35
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    I was a math minor. Just figure that it's going to take as much outside work for one math class as for the total of all of your other classes.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  16. #36
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    I came across the idea of dyscalcula for the first time in a YA novel (forget the name), where the heroine had it. I almost fell off my chair. First, that this could explain the math horrorshow and second, that it never occurred to me that if there was such a thing as dyslexia, why not a number version? I'm not convinced it exists - the general craptastic level of math teaching in school has to account for 90% of math problems people have. I think we forget to factor in that virtually all early grade teachers are horrible at teaching all but the quickest students, and everyone is slow at something. So the kids who are quick at math become at-risk for dyslexia, and the kids who are quick at words become at-risk for dyscalcula. It might make more sense to simply classify teachers as the problem, but they're represented by unions so it's easier to just label the kids.



  17. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by vacation1 View Post
    I came across the idea of dyscalcula for the first time in a YA novel (forget the name), where the heroine had it. I almost fell off my chair. First, that this could explain the math horrorshow and second, that it never occurred to me that if there was such a thing as dyslexia, why not a number version? I'm not convinced it exists - the general craptastic level of math teaching in school has to account for 90% of math problems people have. I think we forget to factor in that virtually all early grade teachers are horrible at teaching all but the quickest students, and everyone is slow at something. So the kids who are quick at math become at-risk for dyslexia, and the kids who are quick at words become at-risk for dyscalcula. It might make more sense to simply classify teachers as the problem, but they're represented by unions so it's easier to just label the kids.
    I'm afraid it doesn't work that way. Dyslexia is not caused by poor teaching, but appropriate teaching can help.

    Nice job bashing teachers and unions though...I guess that was your motive for the post.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    I'm afraid it doesn't work that way. Dyslexia is not caused by poor teaching, but appropriate teaching can help. Nice job bashing teachers and unions though...I guess that was your motive for the post.
    I hope you're not a teacher, because you have some sort of reading comprehension limitations. I didn't say teachers caused learning disorders, I implied that many children don't have learning disorders so much as they lack decent teachers.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #39
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    As a tutor, I can tell you that most teachers in lower grades barely know how to teach math to kids that have no issues. There was an interesting study a few years ago the showed that math anxiety is contagious.
    http://arstechnica.com/science/2010/...male-students/

    So consider a kid slightly different from what is considered "normal", their chances of success are slim with a poor teacher. Math teachers in high school are usually better. But by then, it is often too late for many students. They are already convinced that they "aren't good at math" and have given up.

    Math is one of the few subjects where there is often a "right answer" and perfection is possible. My tutoring mantra for kids is "World domination through math". It really helps for kids to be exposed to people who are enthusiastic about the subject, who see it as fun.
    See those flying monkeys? They work for me.



  20. #40
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    DD was told she had this in kingergarten, not by someone in the school admin but by her teacher who also has it. Teacher has a masters degree & cant do math.
    HEres what I did when teaching DD--she used her fingers a lot, I didnt care. She had to work harder than her brother/sister in schoolwork, I didnt care. Whatever worked for her, new type of book, doing same problems over/over, lots of review. I told her everyone has gifts & the good Lord didnt give her a brain to visualize math (thats as lcose as I can explain it-she doesnt see the numbers like we do) so she has to work harder then most. DD is sr in HS & is in college level physics, now she wont ever be on Big Bang Theory but shes getting a good grade (well, ok) & Im proud of her for trying Just compensate however you can, avoid when you can & accept it otherwise.
    “Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.” Peter Drucker



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