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  1. #41
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by vacation1 View Post
    I hope you're not a teacher, because you have some sort of reading comprehension limitations. I didn't say teachers caused learning disorders, I implied that many children don't have learning disorders so much as they lack decent teachers.
    Actually, I was disputing your comment regarding dyslexia. Poor teaching does. not. cause. dyslexia.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  2. #42
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    You.can.do.cute.things.with.periods.all.day.but.yo ur.point.is.a.nonsequitor.as.I.did.not.say.poor.te aching.causes.dyslexia.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  3. #43
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    Jan. 27, 2004
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    Oh, I feel your pain. I have a couple of engineering degrees and struggled in every single math class because I absolutely cannot process 'math' the way mathematics majors do. Memorization is a total fail--I still calculate the multiplication table in my head. I'm very fast at calculating, but still have to calculate rather than regurgitate. Ditto "use this equation for this type of problem". I actually have to figure out the equation from scratch, prove to myself it's the correct one for that application, and then apply it (total killer on a timed test!). Thankfully, it got a lot easier in grad school when more and more math became applied and deriving equations became the norm.

    But, yeah, I feel like a freak sometimes.
    ---------------------------



  4. #44
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    Aug. 30, 2011
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    Massachusetts
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReveilleandRinsie View Post
    It took me until college to realize that I am actually able to do math and do it right. Before that, I was in advanced, accelerated, AP, et cetera classes for language, history, et cetera, but in remedial math. I was SO embarrassed, especially because my dad was an engineer and I could feel his disappointment in me. I got Cs and even Ds in math classes up until my junior year of college.

    What it took was first a professor who drove everybody else crazy with his teaching style. He explained every step of every process. When he demonstrated problems, he wrote out every step. Even the little tiny ones. The people in the class who were already good at math were bored out of their skulls, but suddenly I was LEARNING. I was the best student in the class. MATH class. I was utterly shocked, until I realized that so many math teachers teach math because they're good at it. To them, going from y = mx + b to 15 was as easy as breathing ... for me, it was like getting spun around. So someone who went through every. little. thing. helped immensely.

    The other thing that helped was -- don't laugh -- using a particular kind of graph paper. I use that yellowish-green 5-squares-per-inch engineer's paper to do math. It helps change the mechanics of how I look at things physically, and I don't transpose as often. It also, just by being graph paper, encourages me to think more logically, more ... yknow, in squares, if that makes sense. Maybe that would help you?

    Now that I'm an adult, I actually would like to take more math classes, see how I can do now that I understand how I learn math and am willing to chase down the help I need.
    Hmm. This is very intersting to me, as I always felt like there was something fundamental I didn't "get" about math. I too was a poor math student, just didn't understand it. Always felt like religion to me, accepting principles on faith.

    Anyhow -OP- I took elemenatry algebra three times in college before I passed it. Yet, many, many years later I scored very well on the LSAT, and graduated in the top of my class at Law School. My point is that doing poorly in math doesn't mean you're stupid. Even if your parents are engineers and scientists like mine.



  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by vacation1 View Post
    I think we forget to factor in that virtually all early grade teachers are horrible at teaching all but the quickest students, and everyone is slow at something. So the kids who are quick at math become at-risk for dyslexia,
    ????

    I don't usually quote wikipedia, but it's as good on the definition as anything else. I have the auditory processing disorder. Poor teaching does not make one at risk for dyslexia.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dyslexia

    In any case, there is help for people with undiagnosed learning disorders in college...make an appointment with your student disability office.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  6. #46
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    ????

    I don't usually quote wikipedia, but it's as good on the definition as anything else. I have the auditory processing disorder. Poor teaching does not make one at risk for dyslexia.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dyslexia

    In any case, there is help for people with undiagnosed learning disorders in college...make an appointment with your student disability office.
    I too have central auditory processing disorder.
    I was completely deaf for 11 months as a two year old, much of it came back slowly.
    Had problems again at 12 years old, was deaf then for 6 weeks, finally my brain learned to compensate and now am only hard of hearing.

    I would say, most everyone, if carefully tested, would have some kind of problem area, is how brains work and don't work so well in each one individual, plus all what we do to them, from not taking good care, not sleeping enough, etc. to direct assaults on it, like getting drunk or high on something.

    Good that we are resilient, is it, or we would have a hard time being who we are for very long.



  7. #47
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    Nov. 1, 2001
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    It frequently surprises me how people who identify themselves as teachers have basic problems with reading comprehension and analysis.
    See those flying monkeys? They work for me.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #48
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    To explain this one in the slowest possible voice - little Sarah is quick to read but a little slower to pick up math. If Miss Jenny, her teacher, is a good teacher, Sarah is just a kid with strengths and weaknesses. If Miss Jenny is a typical teacher, Sarah is now very likely to be labelled as a child with a learning disability. This is not to deny the existence of learning disabilities. It does question whether every kid who can't basically teach herself in the absence of a decent teacher has a learning disability.

    And before you come back, re-quote me and saying "But that's not what you said," it's not my fault that you have poor reading skills.



  9. #49
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    That's what happened to me. Poor teachers and then I got slapped with an LD. Turns out that my local school system got big funding for every LD student they had at the time and they went crazy building isolated SpED facilities in the late 80's and now they are standard in all new schools instead of whatever rooms they could get their hands on. Many of my peers who were also given the LD label were mostly just screwed-up kids from broken families but a few did have genuine disabilities that were easy to see. By the time I was main-streaming in middle school, the damage was done and I was behind the "long-bus crowd" in math since the SpED program was teaching about two years behind the regular curriculum in math by design but I was still ahead of them in writing and reading due to my own love of books.
    Thus do we growl that our big toes have,
    at this moment, been thrown up from below!



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