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View Poll Results: Do You Wear Helmets While Riding?

Voters
428. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes, always.

    390 91.12%
  • No, never.

    18 4.21%
  • Sometimes.

    20 4.67%
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Results 61 to 80 of 116
  1. #61
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    Jun. 3, 2012
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    Louisa County, Virginia
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    Quote Originally Posted by Equibrit View Post
    I'm not convinced that "approved" helmets are all that good. Now, if somebody came up with a gel lined helmet, that would be dandy. We supply custom seat molding kits to auto racing teams, and I was wondering if the same thing would work for helmets.
    I believe some research into saddle pad materials a few years ago suggested that gel, a liquid, transmits shock across a wider area, but does not absorb it. So I wonder whether your racing seats are designed for driver comfort through hours of racing, or to protect against blunt force trauma to the parts of the body in contact with the seat? While comfort is a consideration, the latter purpose is what we need in our helmets.

    Another good line is "never do anything to your helmet that you wouldn't do to your head." Always reminding the lesson kids and their parents not to chuck the helmet on the mudroom floor when they get home, or leave it freezing/baking under the rear windshield of the car, either.

    Helmet Nazi? Meh, I've been called worse. Read the heartbreaking first three months of Courtney King-Dye's blog from the time of her injury. You'll see her go from remaining hopeful that she'll keep the ride on some of her competition horses and NOT being convinced that all riders should wear helmets....to reluctantly accepting when those owners hired other riders, and finally embracing her unique position to be a powerful advocate for approved helmets every time, every horse.



  2. #62
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
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    4,977

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    Quote Originally Posted by wonderhorseguy View Post
    Do you really think somebody who does not wear a helmet is going to post and subject themseleves to the ridicule which would be heaped on them by the helmet nazis?
    Well, yeah, i have to agree with you on that observation. Kind of a self selecting poll as I figure most non-helmet wearers aren't going to bother opening this thread. I am acquainted with a group of ladies that never wear helmets. They won't argue about it, as they wouldn't care about the reasons for or against, they just don't wear them. They do performances (fancy dress drill team and trick stuff) and don't wear helmets. Wigs and fancy dresses, sure. I don't like it because I think it sets a poor example, especially when these types of things attract a lot of kids. They should have a disclaimer like on car ads -- "professional driver, don't try this yourself!"



  3. #63
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2005
    Location
    Kentucky
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    4,130

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    I wear mine 100% of the time. Always have, had a very safety aware father who refused to let me on without one. After almost 30 years of wearing one, I feel weird without it. I like the idea of gel padding. Someone definitely needs to get on that!



  4. #64
    Join Date
    Jul. 29, 2006
    Location
    Nashville
    Posts
    868

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    I usually put my helmet on in the tack room along with my half chaps.
    It makes it easier to drag all the saddle, bridle, grooming, crop and gloves stuff to the cross ties.
    More important, it's an added safety measure when I go out to the pasture to get my boy and then tack him up. Which was brought home to me last weekend when the not quite a year-old colt ran up and kicked over my head three times!!!!
    I also feel naked without one!!!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Jul. 17, 2009
    Location
    south eastern US
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    2,519

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    I wear my helmet every ride, every time. I didn't always but after seeing a couple of friends have some close calls I now wear my helmet...interestingly enough the friends who inspired me to wear my helmet have both said that they will never wear one....go figure. You would think concussions serious enough to require a trip to the emergency room would do it but nope, they won't wear one....I told them that I wear mine in their honor then.
    "My biggest fear is that when I die my husband is going to try to sell all my horses and tack for what I told him they cost."



  6. #66
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2006
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    5,388

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    I think my helmet-wearing days really started when I had kids.

    When I was a kid there were no rules about the under-18 set wearing helmets (those came about when I was a teenager and I was "grandfathered in" at my barn), and we only put them on to jump. I kept up that attitude through 25 years of riding. And eventually that turned into only wearing a helmet when jumping "big" (>3'6") and never for less than that. Had a young horse flip over backwards on me (reared and came down on top of me) helmetless and while I was unable to talk for 10-15 minutes, I was fine otherwise, so didn't learn much of a lesson there.

    Then I had kids and 2 things stuck in my mind: 1) I couldn't risk myself with small kids who needed me and 2) once the kids were old enough to ride it would be hypocritical to make them wear helmets if I didn't.

    And now it's become a way of life. I used to hop up helmetless with no worries, and now feel a sense of impending doom if I do so. So every day, every ride for me now!
    __________________________________
    Forever exiled in the NW.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2012
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    knee deep in Oregon mud
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    I never used to, until I got in a bad accident. Even though I didn't hit my head at all in that specific incident, it really made me think about all of the things in our sport that are beyond our control. Now I wear my helmet every ride, no matter how easygoing the horse.
    It is only through labor and painful effort, by grim energy and resolute courage, that we move on to better things.
    Theodore Roosevelt



  8. #68
    Join Date
    Mar. 1, 2003
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    Happily in Canada
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    4,812

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    Quote Originally Posted by Calvincrowe View Post
    Approved helmet, every ride, every time. Horse tripped, I fell and suffered a concussion--at the walk--while wearing an approved helmet. I shudder to think what would have happened had I been wearing a ball cap or nothing at all.
    Ditto, except mine was a slip at the trot.
    Blugal

    You never know what kind of obsessive compulsive crazy person you are until another person imitates your behaviour at a three-day. --Gry2Yng



  9. #69
    Join Date
    Apr. 10, 2012
    Location
    South of Mars
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    77

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    Working in the ER, ICU and on a helicopter trauma unit made me a believer. I wear mine 100% of the time. Always.



  10. #70
    Join Date
    May. 14, 2003
    Location
    Fifth Grade Land!!! USA
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    1,319

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    Every time, every ride and I have started keeping tabs on the age of the helmet and replacing about every 3 years, even if no falls.

    I was super glad I had on a ski helmet on Monday when I made "friends" with a tree branch on the side of the slope!
    Member-Arab Dressage Riders Clique
    RIP Barichello



  11. #71
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    May. 4, 2011
    Posts
    84

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    I used to almost always (~95% of the time) wear a helmet, but that changed to 100% of the time, all the time after Courtney King-Dye's injury.



  12. #72
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
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    5,099

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    Quote Originally Posted by Equibrit View Post
    I'm not convinced that "approved" helmets are all that good. Now, if somebody came up with a gel lined helmet, that would be dandy. We supply custom seat molding kits to auto racing teams, and I was wondering if the same thing would work for helmets.
    Well, their butts sit on the gel – but what are their helmets made out of? (because they are required to wear approved helmets to protect their heads!)

    My dad races cars – no fancy gel seats, but he does have a serious ASTM approved helmet, the racing organization requires it, and he appreciated his brain, so he happily wears one.

    A team of Stanford doctors declared that without a doubt, I would have serious brain damage, or be dead if it were not for my approved helmet. I still ended up with brain swelling and a three day induced coma - but without it, they were fairly certain I would have had skull fractures and much more bleeding.

    These links relate to pediatrics, but I would think it would be fairly safe to assume adult heads would be just as protected by helmets:

    http://nasdonline.org

    The most common cause of death and serious injury in all riders is head injury

    Prevention

    Consistent use of secured, ASTM* standard, SEI† certified equestrian helmets will lead to a decrease in equestrian deaths and serious injuries. See foot notes to studies) 3,9,13,14,17,19
    http://pediatrics.aappublications.org

    Head injuries were more frequent in those patients not wearing helmets. The mean Modified Injury Severity Scale (MISS) score for riders without a helmet (12.9) was significantly higher (more severe) than that for helmeted riders (2.8). All three patients with a Glascow Coma Score <15 on arrival were not wearing a helmet at the time of injury. The frequency of hospitalization was significantly higher for those not wearing a helmet.

    Conclusion. Equestrian injuries are more severe than those suffered from other common pediatric mechanisms. Helmet use is associated with decreased frequency and severity of central nervous system injury.
    The American Association of Neurological Surgeons says:


    While serious head injury can occur while wearing a helmet, the data very clearly shows that the severity of the head injury can be decreased through helmet wear.



  13. #73
    Join Date
    Dec. 25, 2006
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    Overland, MO
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    1,334

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    When I first started riding, it was way pre-modern helmets and I was riding western. When I switched to English, I'd wear my velvet hardhat only in lessons or while jumping. Then the new style of helmets came out and I started wearing every time, every ride, whether it was English or western, even when I showed western pleasure. I'd feel naked if I didn't have a helmet on when I was on a horse!



  14. #74
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2008
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    MD
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    3,771

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    When I rode as a kid (western) in the 60's - no helmet. When I started as an adult re-rider in my late 30's in the hunters - I got the best advice ever from the tack store owner where I bought my first helmet. "The most important money you'll spend should be on what pay to protect your head, priority #2 will be good training."

    Rule for myself, and anyone who rides my horses, or on my property, or the rare times I teach - If your foot is in the stirrup, there's a helmet on your head. I generally strap mine on before putting on the bridle, and with some horses, before I start grooming. I've had girthy horses kick out at you when you reach under their bellies to grab the girth - its a scary idea to think of that foot connecting with my head.
    Lowly Farm Hand with Delusions of Barn Biddieom.
    Witherun Farm
    http://witherun-farm.blogspot.com/



  15. #75
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    Feb. 6, 2003
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    Deep South
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martha Drum View Post
    So I wonder whether your racing seats are designed for driver comfort through hours of racing, or to protect against blunt force trauma to the parts of the body in contact with the seat? While comfort is a consideration, the latter purpose is what we need in our helmets.
    They are designed to protect the driver in the event of sudden impact (blunt force trauma). They are custom molded to the individual's body contours (not gel) to avoid movement of the body within the seat. It's my experience that current helmets (including ASTM approved racing helmets) are not too secure, and would benefit if you could mold the inner shock absorbing shell to the contours of the wearer's head. Failing custom molding, some form of gel may do the same job. After all there are no heads that actually match the smooth contours inside a helmet.
    Last edited by Equibrit; Feb. 22, 2013 at 08:16 PM.
    ... _. ._ .._. .._



  16. #76
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    Oct. 2, 2012
    Location
    In the wilds of Northern Ontario, Canada
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    359

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    Quote Originally Posted by PNWjumper View Post

    Then I had kids and 2 things stuck in my mind: 1) I couldn't risk myself with small kids who needed me and 2) once the kids were old enough to ride it would be hypocritical to make them wear helmets if I didn't.
    I think the same thing every time I see a family out for a bike ride. Kids all helmeted up and the parents bare headed. In this province there is a helmet law for kids under 16 on bikes, and the parents can get a ticket if the kid is caught without one. Every time I see a family out like that (kids helmeted and parents not) my first thought is, "and who's going to raise your kids when you are vegetables living out what's left of your lives in a hospital?" The other thing is if the parents don't set an example by wearing helmets, the minute that kid turns 16 that helmet is coming off for sure.

    Helmet, every time -- bike or horse.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #77
    Join Date
    Jun. 3, 2012
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    Louisa County, Virginia
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    Quote Originally Posted by Equibrit View Post
    They are designed to protect the driver in the event of sudden impact (blunt force trauma). They are custom molded to the individual's body contours (not gel) to avoid movement of the body within the seat. It's my experience that current helmets (including ASTM approved racing helmets) are not too secure, and would benefit if you could mold the inner shock absorbing shell to the contours of the wearer's head. Failing custom molding, some form of gel may do the same job. After all there are no heads that actually match the smooth contours inside a helmet.
    Thank you, that is helpful, I misunderstood. The gel part was more for improved fit than for shock absorption, which was how I read it. Yes, fit is extremely important too. This is an interesting suggestion and shows how inter-sport cooperation is beneficial.



  18. #78
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    Jun. 3, 2012
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    Louisa County, Virginia
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    Here's what Ms. King-Dye herself has to say, produced two weeks ago:

    http://www.youtube.com/embed/pNfRVNrdyEU

    This was linked from her website, so I assume it is OK to share, but if I am wrong, just let me know and will delete.

    Just coming up on the third anniversary of her accident.



  19. #79
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    Feb. 15, 2004
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    Ontario
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    Quote Originally Posted by FatDinah View Post
    More important, it's an added safety measure when I go out to the pasture to get my boy and then tack him up. Which was brought home to me last weekend when the not quite a year-old colt ran up and kicked over my head three times!!!!
    I don't ride regularly, but I have a helmet (just in case I want to get on bareback). But maybe I should wear it to go into the field ... muddy field... my boots were locked (with my keys in my car)... I decided to get my mare and walk cautiously along the fence line where it was not so muddy. I made the mistake to walk ahead of her ... then a young mare came running up behind us and my mare, being the pushover that she is, decided to get out of her way... but running into me... face plant into the mud for me and I counted one, two feet... the 3rd one got me (just clipped) in the back of my head and the 4th one in my back... I had the biggest goose egg...
    My DD, the only time she rode helmetless... mare slipped on ice and daughter, bareback and totally relaxed, fell down and met hoof on the way down... ear almost torn and concussion. Now she wears a helmet all the time (and biking and skiing).
    My friend is still recovering (a year ago this past week) from a fall where helmet met rock. Helmet cracked in two. Loss of memory, of balance, etc. She is still NQR and has not been back on a horse since.



  20. #80
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    Dec. 6, 2003
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    Horse Country, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martha Drum View Post
    Read the heartbreaking first three months of Courtney King-Dye's blog from the time of her injury. You'll see her go from remaining hopeful that she'll keep the ride on some of her competition horses and NOT being convinced that all riders should wear helmets....to reluctantly accepting when those owners hired other riders, and finally embracing her unique position to be a powerful advocate for approved helmets every time, every horse.
    Is there a link to this? The only blog I could find doesn't begin until 2011, and I would love to read the updates from immediately after her accident.
    <><



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