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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2004
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    where the grass is always greener
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    Default Treating Spur Rubs

    My mare has super sensitive skin and we've been battling spur rubs whether I ride with spurs or without. I'm looking for a product that will treat and another that might be able to help prevent rubs.

    Has anyone tried the SilverAG line from equifit? I would like to try it, but not sure if I should purchase the spray or the balm, or both?

    What has worked for you?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2012
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    The Part of TN in the Wrong Time Zone
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    1,977

    Default

    SilverAg works well but I normally just use antibacterial whatever the while its raw and then to prevent, I ride the sensitive skinned + spurs horses with an ovation pad designed to prevent spur rubs.
    .אני יכול לעשות הכל על ידי אלוהים



  3. #3
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    Apr. 3, 2012
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    Among the mosquitos and horse flies
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    Default

    Corona works great on spur rubs, it's thikk so stays on well and heals quickly. To prevent, several companies sell saddle pads w/ long sides so you're pushing against the saddle pad and not directly to their sides. A cheap way to do that is to safety pin standing bandages (quilts) to a baby pad and make sure they reach where your leg goes.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2013
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    Greensboro, NC
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    Default

    corona would work well. and maybe use MTG to help the hair grow back over the raw spots once the skin has healed.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2008
    Location
    Alabama
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    Default

    I use plain old Neosporin on my horse. He's a thin skinned chestnut, and while I don't battle spur rubs I'm constantly battling hock sores and bit rubs. The Neosporin seems to heal everything up quickly.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 14, 2012
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    110

    Default

    Once you get those healed up...I now apply this on the sensitive TB I ride. I just apply in the area where my leg tends to rub off fur: http://www.drugstore.com/band-aid-ac...tick/qxp163404



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2006
    Location
    Seattle, WA
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    5,405

    Default

    What type of spur rubs? I agree with the above if you're talking rubbed, raw, or broken skin. But quick questions: is it seasonal (i.e. only mid/end of winter)? Are they spur wounds or simply lost hair?

    This is the time of the year that many of my clipped horses over the years have gone bald under even moderately rubbed areas because there's no spring coat growing up under the compromised (meaning clipped) winter coat yet. I have a mare that's extremely prone to rubs where she's clipped. and she's now naked where my leg goes and where the reins touch her neck while being ridden (and a few other spots from her blanket). I don't think there's anything you can do to help rub spots like that (where the hair is affected but not the skin). Putting lotions and ointments on those areas tend to make them a little "stickier" and doesn't help the hair grow back. What does help is the arrival of spring, when the summer coat starts growing in.

    Now my mare also has very sensitive skin. I've let a couple of gals ride her in the last few years and have had to pull spurs off of them almost immediately. But that's because they give her rub marks that break the skin. For those I use whatever I have on hand (neosporin, corona, ). But the real key is in eliminating the source of the rub. It also comes down to educating the riders on correct usage of spur (which is NOT to make the horse go forward....I HATE HATE HATE the "nagging spur ride").

    If you are really concerned about hair loss, my suggestion would be a leg bandage or one of the saddle pads with an extended area where your leg goes. For the ones that I've had you'd have to start using that as soon as they were clipped in the fall. But I suspect that my mare would still get rubs. Some horses are just prone to it (and she's the only one of my 5 who is).

    Interesting idea with the liquid bandaid. Seems like it wouldn't work well when the horse still had hair, but also seems like a great idea on a horse that had a spur wound that was in the process of healing. Lynnland - do you apply it to areas that have plenty of hair?
    __________________________________
    Forever exiled in the NW.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 22, 2001
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    5,146

    Default

    What PNW said about avoiding them, though this time of year it's just really hard when their new coats haven't started coming in yet. Many eventers who are seeking to make sure to avoid or aggravate a spur mark will lay a towel over the horse's back on top of the saddle pad but under the saddle. Thin enough not to interfere with your leg, but stays in place really easy (can't imagine trying to keep a leg bandage in there.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2004
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    where the grass is always greener
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    Default

    I would say its rubbed, but it's not necessarily always raw. It is a minor spur rub compared to others I have seen, but I hate leaving one on her! I think we are going to trace clip her so I will see if that helps. I have taken off the spur in question, and to be honest, she still gets a rub from my boot. Hoping her spring coat will be the answer!


    Thanks for the suggestions!!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2009
    Posts
    142

    Default

    Use the Ovation No Mark Pad. It retails for $30.00 and is available in horse and pony sizes.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov. 14, 2012
    Posts
    110

    Default

    Hi PNWjumper - it's not liquid bandaid but seems to be a type of wax that goes on kind of like a deodorant stick but is very slipery and seems to protect the fur. Yup, I run it over the non-clipped fur and it just slicks it down.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep. 27, 2000
    Location
    Southern California - on a freeway someplace
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    9,717

    Default

    BodyGlide to prevent, or if hair, but not skin, is rubbed away. In my horse's case the bigger problem turned out to be the seam on the half chaps. If the skin is chapped or broken, I would use something that would toughen it like AluShield as opposed to a goopy product that would keep in soft and might create more friction. Another think that might work is GallSalve.
    The Evil Chem Prof



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar. 3, 2003
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    328

    Default

    Has anyone ever tried Vitamin E oil?
    **Stacey**



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 24, 2005
    Location
    My own little world!
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    137

    Default

    Another thing is make sure you clean your spurs after each use. I noticed spur rubs on my mare and found that where they touched her, there was a film of arena dirt and who-knows-what-else on the spur. Now I wipe down my spurs after every ride and the marks are gone.


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