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  1. #1
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    Oct. 21, 2013
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    Default Piano People, what is this called? Found piano, now need to move it!

    So I am looking for a piano with a similar style to this one, I find it really beautiful:

    https://baltimore.craigslist.org/msg/4350663089.html

    Problem is, I've just seen it on there tonight and I don't think I can afford a mover for such short notice- he says it must be gone on Sunday. My mom says movers charge over $500 which is out of my price range right now. So how can I describe this piano? I like the "legs" and delicate look to it. I type in cream/ white yamaha on google and do not find this style.
    Last edited by Jhein12; Mar. 6, 2014 at 11:53 PM.
    To understand via the heart is not to understand.



  2. #2
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    Jan. 9, 2009
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    I believe that style, with the curved legs, is called French Provincial. (It describes all kinds of furniture, not just pianos.)
    --
    Wendy
    ... and Patrick


    4 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
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    Mar. 8, 2009
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    I think it is an upright M500CV

    Go onto yamaha's website, they have other similar pianos.

    Try "googling" : upright piano curved legs
    Check in pictures.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
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    Jul. 3, 2012
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    Default

    Asian pianos have a brighter, sharper sound than the European pianos. This one will not have a rich, mellow sound. More like an electric keyboard. I am bias...I have a Schimmel..
    Ride like you mean it.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
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    Nov. 29, 2008
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alibi_18 View Post
    From Yamaha's website:
    http://usa.yamaha.com/products/music...cm/?mode=model



  6. #6
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    Oct. 21, 2013
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alterhorse View Post
    Looks like it is no longer in production

    I looked some more and found some similar and they say spinet piano.
    To understand via the heart is not to understand.



  7. #7
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    Nov. 29, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jhein12 View Post
    Looks like it is no longer in production

    I looked some more and found some similar and they say spinet piano.
    I think there's a diference between a spinet and an upright. I think it has to do with how the hammer action functions, but I'm not completely sure.


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  8. #8
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    Oct. 21, 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by alterhorse View Post
    I think there's a diference between a spinet and an upright. I think it has to do with how the hammer action functions, but I'm not completely sure.
    Thanks. I'm working on maybe looking at this and picking it up this weekend. Does anyone have advice on problems to look for that would be very costly to fix? Of course a tuning would need to be done after the move.
    To understand via the heart is not to understand.



  9. #9
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    Mar. 30, 2007
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    It's a P600/P660. Discontinued some time ago and that color is definitely not the original one.
    SPACE FOR RENT


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2006
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    NY
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    Pianos are usually categorized by either being console, spinet, or upright; or baby grand/grand.

    The style of the case is an entirely different thing - the shape of the legs, color of the case, or overall style is completely unrelated to the build of the piano.

    For me, this style would be unappealing, but the piano itself might be fine. So first you need to decide whether you are buying this for the style (furniture look) or the piano type.

    As for moving - most/many movers will quote you for the move based on mileage. Call and get a couple of estimates. I paid $200 for my grand upright to be moved about 25 miles so it was very reasonable, and piano movers are extremely careful (I will admit it was fascinating to watch them move my piano only 20 feet from the truck to the place it was going, but they still wrapped it and used special dollies to get it there.)

    If you love this style/color, then it is probably worth the price (if the piano is in reasonable working condition), especially if it has been refinished.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
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    Oct. 21, 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by S1969 View Post
    Pianos are usually categorized by either being console, spinet, or upright; or baby grand/grand.

    The style of the case is an entirely different thing - the shape of the legs, color of the case, or overall style is completely unrelated to the build of the piano.

    For me, this style would be unappealing, but the piano itself might be fine. So first you need to decide whether you are buying this for the style (furniture look) or the piano type.

    As for moving - most/many movers will quote you for the move based on mileage. Call and get a couple of estimates. I paid $200 for my grand upright to be moved about 25 miles so it was very reasonable, and piano movers are extremely careful (I will admit it was fascinating to watch them move my piano only 20 feet from the truck to the place it was going, but they still wrapped it and used special dollies to get it there.)

    If you love this style/color, then it is probably worth the price (if the piano is in reasonable working condition), especially if it has been refinished.
    I do not know much about piano type. It looks like this is an upright or spinet piano, which is what I think I first learned on. What is the difference between the two? I remember playing on a grand later on at my instructors house, and the sound was wonderful, but I do not have space for a baby grand/ grand.
    To understand via the heart is not to understand.



  12. #12
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    Dec. 18, 2006
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    This is either a spinet or console; honestly I can't remember the difference but basically they are smaller. An upright was once just a repackaged grand piano - same size, just upright. But even though smaller than a grand piano they were still big and heavy. Consoles and spinets are more compact, and therefore might not have as big of a sound, but that is fine for most people in their home.



  13. #13
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    Nov. 20, 2010
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    We were in the market for a new piano about 15 years ago. AS S1969 says, the main difference is the size of the sounding board, with console being the smallest - and frankly an upright, even though that's what many of us learned on - the largest, so expected to have a nicer sound.

    What makes or breaks a piano is if the sounding board has been cracked or otherwise damaged. Think that happens from years of perhaps being stored improperly - in cold, etc. But also possibly from a bad move. Although my experience w/ piano movers is they are really good and know what they do. I've bought a piano at auction and paid more for the mover than the piano ($300 vs. $100 ) and it was well worth the price.

    You can see the sounding board and possibly obvious cracks if looking from the top down (lifting up the top shelf - usually attached with a hinge), or if the front bottom panel lifts up or can be removed. But a piano tuner will be your best at determining this. But a cracked sounding board makes a piano worthless.

    I had sticky and silent keys, and a non-functional pedal on that $100 piano. Was lucky enough to have a concert pianist in my neighborhood who recommended his piano tuner. Think it was another $300 for the repairs. The piano tuner was blind. That was fascinating watching him.

    And you should expect to have the piano tuned after delivery. Even a well tuned piano loses it in the move.

    Finally, one thing that is really different in pianos is the action. You can get a sticky key fixed, but some pianos are easier to play than others. Some needing a lighter strike, and others a more forceful one. Some even have a smaller key board. I have an old Chickering that I love because the reach is easy.

    For great advice, see if you can get the name of a good local piano tuner. They will also give you the name of a good mover - or vice versa. And they aren't always vying to get the piano you saw on Craigslist.

    Good luck, and hope this piano gives you happy memories. I think it's sad so many have gone by the wayside for electric keyboards.
    Being right half the time beats being half-right all the time. Malcolm Forbes


    2 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
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    Oct. 21, 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by CVPeg View Post
    We were in the market for a new piano about 15 years ago. AS S1969 says, the main difference is the size of the sounding board, with console being the smallest - and frankly an upright, even though that's what many of us learned on - the largest, so expected to have a nicer sound.

    What makes or breaks a piano is if the sounding board has been cracked or otherwise damaged. Think that happens from years of perhaps being stored improperly - in cold, etc. But also possibly from a bad move. Although my experience w/ piano movers is they are really good and know what they do. I've bought a piano at auction and paid more for the mover than the piano ($300 vs. $100 ) and it was well worth the price.

    You can see the sounding board and possibly obvious cracks if looking from the top down (lifting up the top shelf - usually attached with a hinge), or if the front bottom panel lifts up or can be removed. But a piano tuner will be your best at determining this. But a cracked sounding board makes a piano worthless.

    I had sticky and silent keys, and a non-functional pedal on that $100 piano. Was lucky enough to have a concert pianist in my neighborhood who recommended his piano tuner. Think it was another $300 for the repairs. The piano tuner was blind. That was fascinating watching him.

    And you should expect to have the piano tuned after delivery. Even a well tuned piano loses it in the move.

    Finally, one thing that is really different in pianos is the action. You can get a sticky key fixed, but some pianos are easier to play than others. Some needing a lighter strike, and others a more forceful one. Some even have a smaller key board. I have an old Chickering that I love because the reach is easy.

    For great advice, see if you can get the name of a good local piano tuner. They will also give you the name of a good mover - or vice versa. And they aren't always vying to get the piano you saw on Craigslist.

    Good luck, and hope this piano gives you happy memories. I think it's sad so many have gone by the wayside for electric keyboards.
    I don't like electric keyboards, just not the same It looks like I won't be able to purchase this piano, since it is on such short notice and I can't swing the cost of it plus the professional movers since my dad and his friends can't help out this weekend. I'm sure another one will come along. I found this one:

    http://smd.craigslist.org/msg/4302593084.html
    To understand via the heart is not to understand.



  15. #15
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    Oct. 18, 2000
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    Connecticut
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    I went up on your cl link, looked a few pages back, and found this:
    http://smd.craigslist.org/msg/4298286681.html

    It wouldn't hurt to respond and see if it is still available.
    "The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits." Albert Einstein

    http://s1098.photobucket.com/albums/...2011%20Photos/



  16. #16
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    Oh, sorry you can't get this one. But I have a feeling, with all of us baby boomers retiring and down-sizing, and being the last hold-outs to learn on something besides a keyboard, that there will be many pianos to come, and that you'll find the right one at the right time. Good luck!
    Being right half the time beats being half-right all the time. Malcolm Forbes


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
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    Oct. 21, 2013
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    So I found a piano and am picking it up tomorrow. I can just afford it, not the cost of moving by professionals, so my dad is going to put it either in the back of his truck, or a trailer attached to the truck. He will have several strong people to help him with wheeling the piano up onto the truck/ trailer and transporting it to my house. Lucky for us, the piano is literally two streets away from my house. I walk right past the house on my way to class! Any advice on how to safely move it by ourselves other than strapping it down good? It is a small upright similar in size to the original piano I posted. It has to be moved down two small steps once it gets outside of the mans house and up two steps to go into my house.
    To understand via the heart is not to understand.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jhein12 View Post
    So I found a piano and am picking it up tomorrow. I can just afford it, not the cost of moving by professionals, so my dad is going to put it either in the back of his truck, or a trailer attached to the truck. He will have several strong people to help him with wheeling the piano up onto the truck/ trailer and transporting it to my house. Lucky for us, the piano is literally two streets away from my house. I walk right past the house on my way to class! Any advice on how to safely move it by ourselves other than strapping it down good? It is a small upright similar in size to the original piano I posted. It has to be moved down two small steps once it gets outside of the mans house and up two steps to go into my house.
    Lots and lots of moving blankets. Baby and cushion the crap out of that thing. I would personally try to keep it upright as possible; don't lie it on its side or anything like that. If you can, have two people sit with it in the back of the truck when moving it and drive slowly.


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  19. #19
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    Dec. 18, 2006
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    NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pony+ an inch View Post
    Lots and lots of moving blankets. Baby and cushion the crap out of that thing. I would personally try to keep it upright as possible; don't lie it on its side or anything like that. If you can, have two people sit with it in the back of the truck when moving it and drive slowly.
    Yes, this. You should get a ramp so that you can roll it up the ramp, not try to lift it up and down (for your backs, and for safety). Upright pianos are not as likely to break as a long, horizontal soundboard like a grand style, but if you drop it, you're in trouble.

    Good luck.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
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    Oct. 21, 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by S1969 View Post
    Yes, this. You should get a ramp so that you can roll it up the ramp, not try to lift it up and down (for your backs, and for safety). Upright pianos are not as likely to break as a long, horizontal soundboard like a grand style, but if you drop it, you're in trouble.

    Good luck.
    Thanks, they are bringing a ramp. I guess we should try to use it for all of the steps and for getting onto the truck? Hopefully it doesn't rain... they will bring a tarp.
    To understand via the heart is not to understand.



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