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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2011
    Posts
    540

    Default room temp saddle

    I am wondering if it makes any difference to the life of my saddle if I keep it in room temp or at least above freezing or if keeping it in my tack room where the temperature fluctuates.
    thx



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 12, 2008
    Posts
    1,014

    Default

    I wonder the same...I see in adds that people sometimes say that the saddle was kept in a house which leads one to believe that temp. might make a difference.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 26, 2008
    Posts
    786

    Default

    I have 20+ yr old saddles that have been kept in a non-heated tack room (at least part of their lives), not overly babied, nor abused. They are in good working order, can be shown in type.
    A good quality saddle to begin with = a saddle that will last and work.
    Horses should be trained in such a way that they not only love their riders, but look forward to the time they are with them.
    ~ Xenophon, 350 B.C.


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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    5,679

    Default

    I would think very cold temps would mean very low humidity, therefore you would want to keep the leather conditioned.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    10,947

    Default

    How have "english" saddles ever survived in England all these years?

    Warm and damp does in more leather than cold and dry. Leather cells are dead. So save the Intensive Care for you.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    5,679

    Default

    Yes, but leather will get dry and brittle! Surely you have seen tack that was neglected and became hard / cracked / weak.

    Or I guess leather never needs oiled or conditioned, being as it is "dead"?

    I have a saddle that is in storage - I have to pull it out and oil it about once a year, because it drys out considerably in its non use.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2000
    Location
    Proud owner of one Lunar acre! (Campanus Crater, The Moon)
    Posts
    14,174

    Default

    It's not an issue because the super dry and cold temps just do not last. I suppose if you stored your saddle in a subzero freezer all year round you might have issues. Temps fluctuate, as does humidity. Hot dry climates have more issues due to the constant low humidity. Cold places tend to have snow and rain or sleet--which means they have higher humidity at times.

    Places with super high humidity through most of the year (thinking Pacfic NW here) can cause the opposite problem with saddles because even though they get cold, it's a damp cold. And they rarely get super dry and hot.

    So, once again, storing a saddle at a stable in the cold temps of winter in places that have fluctuating humidity and year round temps is just not a big deal and does not call for more oiling, etc., than another time of year.
    "Relinquish your whip!!"



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2009
    Posts
    6,998

    Default

    Leather is just leather - consider what is happening with the tree - wood warps, plastic gets brittle ... ask your saddle manufacturer how long they've warrantied the tree & how they arrived at such a time period


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2009
    Location
    Montreal, Qc
    Posts
    3,151

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Appsolute View Post
    I would think very cold temps would mean very low humidity, therefore you would want to keep the leather conditioned.
    Cold temp AND humidity are prevalent here! Really not good for saddles.

    I prefer my saddles/bridles to be in a more 'controlled' environment like my appartment during winter time.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2004
    Location
    Sandgate, VT
    Posts
    942

    Default

    Cold doesn't do much to leather, especially if it's well-maintained. High humidity is a far bigger issue. Cold will, if the saddle is left to sit for a period of time, bring out the natural fats in the leather (called "saddler's bloom" and often mistaken for mildew/mold) and create a white haze on the leather. This is usually rubbed back in during use, but if the saddle sits in cool temps, the bloom will solidify on the surface. Bringing it into warm temps and rubbing the bloom with a soft cloth will allow it to re-absorb. If the bloom is stubborn, low heat from a hair dryer can help melt it so it can be rubbed in.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 22, 2003
    Location
    Home of "The Office", PA
    Posts
    977

    Default

    Purely personal observation, but my saddles seem to fair much better in my non-heated barn during the winter than they do during the summer.
    The only thing the government needs to solve all of its problems is a Council of Common Sense.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2011
    Posts
    540

    Default

    Kit I have never heard of saddle bloom before but I think I have observed it. I had also never considered the tree..... good thought.
    Well I feel better about keeping my saddles in the unheated tack room. Thanks



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul. 4, 2007
    Posts
    374

    Default

    I have nothing to add about how climate affects leather, but rather my justification for keeping my saddle in my home (room temperature living.) Tack tends to "walk away" at my boarding barn. At this point in my life, if my saddle were stolen, I would be up a creek with no way to replace it. Hence, room temp saddle!



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar. 12, 2006
    Posts
    2,168

    Default

    I keep mine in my house. Stays cleaner and when it's cold out the saddle isn't as stiff when I put it on my horse in the winter. (plus I clean it more regularly because it's near) I also think it helps the stitching last.
    "All top hat and no canter". *Graureiter*



  15. #15
    Join Date
    May. 14, 2004
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Thats what I have on my saddle. Saddle Bloom!! I had no idea...I thought it was reoccurring mold.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2007
    Posts
    9,434

    Default

    Controlling temperature is not really a big deal. Controlling humidity can be.

    A dehumidifier is a fine addition to most tack rooms. By keeping humidity low I doubt you're measurably "drying out" the leather. You are preventing the growth of a lot of bacteria, fungus, mold, etc. IMO these are much more damaging to leather the a mere lack of moisture.

    In a dry climate I'd probably be a bit more liberal with a good quality leather dressing.

    G.
    Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão



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