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  1. #21
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    Feb. 14, 2012
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    What a tragedy! What a beautiful person, inside and out, one can just tell by looking at the pictures. Jingling for peace for her family! Godspeed Renee.
    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
    I prefer them outside playing as opposed to standing in the barn aisle playing "I can crap more than you"
    New Year, New Blog... follow Willow and I here.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  2. #22
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    Aug. 13, 2008
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    Wisconsin
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    My condolences to her family and friends. I don't know her but can tell that she was beautiful both on the inside as well as the outside.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
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    Dec. 19, 2005
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    Some where in the middle of nowhere.
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    It is a terrible travesty. She was a shining example of what a person can be when they are not afraid to stand up for their convictions and live their life to the fullest.
    "I would not beleive her if her tongue came notorized"


    3 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
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    May. 4, 2006
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    Seabeck - the soggy peninsula
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    While this is tragic, it is by no means an accident. I am so sorry to say this here but this was entirely preventable. Do people actually think this is so easy to do? Who in their right mind does such a thing with a horse?
    "I have brought on the hatred of Wall Street and I relish it".
    Franklin Delano Roosevelt


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
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    Mar. 2, 2007
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    Upper and Lower Canada
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    I don't know exactly how the rope was wrapped and maybe it is just because I am a klutz but I am very conscious about holding the lead folded rather than looped and even then, sometimes I look down and there will be a loop around my hand. Maybe this is what happened.

    Although rereading the newspaper article, it looks as if she was grooming the horse out in the field and did have the rope around her arm, if that is what really happened.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
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    Mar. 19, 2010
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    I only met her once, at ClipClop last year, and she was a very special person. Her pictures don't even capture the half of it.

    Though I get the inclination to think "I would never do X so Y could never happen to me" - nice thought, but accidents happen every day that could have been prevented "if only". We don't know precisely what happened, but I would bet that there is not one of us that hasn't done something "stupid" with a horse. I sure have - I was just lucky enough not to pay for the mistake with my life.

    I hope it is some comfort to her family and friends to know that so many people are thinking of her and them.
    Most people don't need a $35,000 horse. They need a $1,000 horse and $34,000 in lessons.

    "I don't have to be fair… . I'm an American With a Strong, Fact-Free Opinion." (stolen off Facebook)


    4 members found this post helpful.

  7. #27
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    Sep. 21, 2009
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    Queens, NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by Calamber View Post
    While this is tragic, it is by no means an accident. I am so sorry to say this here but this was entirely preventable. Do people actually think this is so easy to do? Who in their right mind does such a thing with a horse?
    Are you serious?
    VP Horse & Carriage Association of NYC

    https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-F...ref=ts&fref=ts


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #28
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    Sep. 2, 2005
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    Upstate NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by michaleenflynn View Post
    Are you serious?
    Clearly Calamber has never tossed a rope over their arm while they do something (a rope that could become tangled if pulled a certain way even though it was not tied there). Calamber is one of those always 100% safe never does anything that could possibly go wrong people.


    8 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
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    Sep. 21, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by trubandloki View Post
    Clearly Calamber has never tossed a rope over their arm while they do something (a rope that could become tangled if pulled a certain way even though it was not tied there). Calamber is one of those always 100% safe never does anything that could possibly go wrong people.
    Apparently.

    My husband and I easily recreated the situation last night while we were talking about it, using an extension cord; you're grooming the horse with the lead rope hanging over one arm, brush in the other hand, horse moves and so as not to drop the rope you just make a quick circle with your arm so that it wraps ONCE - that's all it took. Once the loop went over the free end, he pulled it tight, and the resistance held it there. Utterly and completely understandable.

    But that isn't even what bothered me about her post -- that she would take the time and make the effort to say what she did when our friend died this horrible death is one of the most onerous things I can think of. To what end? She didn't edify anyone - only handslapped and denigrated a dead woman to make herself feel superior? Gross and bizarre.
    VP Horse & Carriage Association of NYC

    https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-F...ref=ts&fref=ts


    7 members found this post helpful.

  10. #30
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    Jul. 15, 2003
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    I am also an advocate of teaching safety and I teach my students that when handling a lead rope "fold it to hold it" and not to loop or coil it, but I cannot tell you how many times I have been holding a lead rope one-handed (picture bringing in horse from field and opening gate with other hand) and you have to give a "pop" or quickly shank the lead rope (such as horse trying to rush through gate or pinning ears at another horse nearby) and the loose end of the lead rope can take on a life of its own, especially if said horse does a head toss or a quick turn.

    I wish the best to her family, it is a horrible accident.
    Every man has a right to his opinion, but no man has a right to be wrong in his facts.
    Bernard M. Baruch


    4 members found this post helpful.

  11. #31
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    Apr. 1, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Calamber View Post
    While this is tragic, it is by no means an accident. I am so sorry to say this here but this was entirely preventable. Do people actually think this is so easy to do? Who in their right mind does such a thing with a horse?
    this was so unnecessary and hurtful Calamber.


    14 members found this post helpful.

  12. #32
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    Sep. 21, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by threedogpack View Post
    this was so unnecessary and hurtful Calamber.
    Better said and more succinct than my post, thank you.
    VP Horse & Carriage Association of NYC

    https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-F...ref=ts&fref=ts


    3 members found this post helpful.

  13. #33
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    Oct. 9, 2002
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    Southern California
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    We all break rules in a moment of not thinking. 99.9 times out of 100, if not 999.9 times out of 1000, nothing happens. But that .1 or .01% is all it takes. It's those who think it will never happen to them that are most likely to get nailed--arrogance makes one blind to mistakes, and with horses, mistakes are painful.

    I am a safety nutball, but back in April last year, I was a complete idiot and my breaking of not one, not two, but FOUR horse safety rules (because I was in a hurry and thought, "Oh, it'll be fine") put me in ER. I was so angry at myself, and so embarrassed, I posted this thread: Stupid, stupid, STUPID...please share your STUPID stories. What it showed me was how many of us have been badly hurt, or at least embarrassingly hurt, from split second errors and split second reactions. In that thread, we got to laugh about it, and we had a wincingly great time.

    Ever since I busted my ankle that day, I have been grateful that all that happened was I busted my ankle. Hell, I thought he'd shattered it and I was looking at surgery and hardware and such--somehow I managed to get away with just the deep bone bruise and shredded ligaments. It could have been so, SO much worse, and it would not have been my horse's fault--it would have been mine.

    We're all human, and we all make mistakes. Hopefully we live to learn from them.

    Please tell us more about Renee and share more pictures if you can. I'd like to hear more about her.
    SA Ferrana Moniet
    Not goodbye--just waiting at the end of the trail.
    My bloggity blog: Hobby Horse: Adventures of the Perpetual Newbie


    5 members found this post helpful.

  14. #34
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    Oct. 26, 2007
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    San Jose, Ca
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    I just have to say – I am very conscious about looping things around my hand / arms – I cut any loops off of my lunge lines, I check often to make sure things are not going to wrap around a limb. I do not wear jewelry around horses.

    Yet last winter, I was leading my horse while carrying a brush box and the excess lead rope in my left hand (folded, not circled!), right hand holding the lead rope near the horse. My horse did a very uncharacteristic spook and bolt, the excess lead rope somehow got tangled around my hand, and tightened very quickly. I was yanked off my feet and almost dragged. By luck I was able to wriggle the rope off my hand (thank goodness!). My hand was badly beaten and bruised by the constriction. It scared the bejesus out of me!

    It can happen so quick, and yes, it can be a total accident.

    Again, condolences to all that loved her, she sounded like an amazing person.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  15. #35
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    Jul. 17, 2009
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    south eastern US
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    Quote Originally Posted by Calamber View Post
    While this is tragic, it is by no means an accident. I am so sorry to say this here but this was entirely preventable. Do people actually think this is so easy to do? Who in their right mind does such a thing with a horse?
    Really? Why would you come on here to say such a thing where you know she has friends who are grieving her loss? You just have a need to feel superior or something? Do you really think you're so perfect that such a thing could never happen to you? It's why they are called accidents. One second of having your attention diverted elsewhere (like making sure horsie doesn't crush your toes as he's moving around or something) and you too could have a freak accident like this. All it takes is one second. This tragedy should be a reminder to all of us to be hyper-aware of just where that rope is and what it's doing.

    Sincerest condolences to her family and those who knew and loved her.
    "My biggest fear is that when I die my husband is going to try to sell all my horses and tack for what I told him they cost."


    5 members found this post helpful.

  16. #36
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    Apr. 6, 2006
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    Virginia
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    Calamber you are a straight up asshat!

    So sorry about your friend mflynn!


    11 members found this post helpful.

  17. #37
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    Nov. 15, 2005
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    NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by michaleenflynn View Post
    Apparently.

    My husband and I easily recreated the situation last night while we were talking about it, using an extension cord; you're grooming the horse with the lead rope hanging over one arm, brush in the other hand, horse moves and so as not to drop the rope you just make a quick circle with your arm so that it wraps ONCE - that's all it took. Once the loop went over the free end, he pulled it tight, and the resistance held it there. Utterly and completely understandable.
    I dunno', I think people are reading that article rather literally, IMO.

    The ME mentions that the lead was wrapped around her arm which caused her to get dragged... that she wrapped it around her arm intentionally or it became wrapped around her arm through the phenomenon of 'crap happens when horses spook or even when they don't' [and those of us who have been around horses long enough know that even with the most cautious care taken it does happen] isn't something I think an ME or anyone who wasn't there can determine.
    Just sayin'

    I'm sorry to those who lost this friend and animal advocate.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  18. #38
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    Dec. 31, 2003
    Location
    Central Ohio
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    I agree this was a tragic accident and the description of events in no way suggests she "tied" the rope to herself. Simply a horrible moment in time where a single loop of rope tightened under pressure. A while back a local, VERY experienced horsewoman was killed when ducking underneath the stall guard, and her horse landed a kick to the head. Absolutely nothing would have predicted it - the horse was simply startled, and by ducking down, her head was low enough to be hit. Now, EVERY time I want to duck under a stall guard, rather than unhook three snaps and go through - I think if that accident. EVERY TIME! People can say "experienced horsemen would NEVER duck under a stall guard." But do they?


    3 members found this post helpful.

  19. #39
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    Mar. 10, 2007
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    Montana
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    I don't believe she had the horse tied to her, I think the horse yanked and as Amwrider said, the rope takes on a life of its own.

    Don't disparage this poor lady when you don't know the facts.

    This was a tragic accident.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  20. #40
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    Jun. 7, 2008
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    now in KCMO, and plan to stay there
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    My condolences to all who knew and loved her. This is a real wakeup call for us all, never ever to forget safety is rule number one.
    Jeanie
    RIP Sasha, best dog ever, pictured shortly before she died, Death either by euthanasia or natural causes is only the end of the animal inhabiting its body; I believe the spirit lives on.


    1 members found this post helpful.

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