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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2011
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    Island of Heart Surrounded by the Sea of Intuition
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    no one will ever find "Perfect"! If that is the only thing, and the buyers understand everything that comes along with cribbing, which it sounds like you have explained then I think they should go for it.

    People and horses all have at least one thing "wrong" it just depends on what you can handle.
    The Love for a Horse is just as Complicated as the Love for another Human being, If you have never Loved a Horse you will Never Understand!!!



  2. #42
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
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    47,012

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    Quote Originally Posted by clint View Post
    I think it is so hard to find the right horse, one that is safe, sound, and jumps for a 12 y.o., that I wouldn't hesitate to buy a cribber. I have had one for years. At first I was utterly horrified, and now I don't pay any attention to it. I kept a collar on her for awhile but I really thought it inhumane and took it off. She cribs when fed grain or treats, but otherwise doesn't. She has always maintained her weight, her teeth are fine, and so is her health. I do have the advantage of having my own place and she doesn't have to live in a stall.
    You are also lucky she is a very mild cribber.
    I have seen more that crib all the time, will take one hour to it a bit of grain because they crib more than they eat.
    They crib on the rope when you tie them to saddle them, will try to crib on a fence post when you get off to open a gate and turned out will stand by a fence post, cribbing on it, all day long, while others come and go, graze and nap.

    When you ride them, those horses are very quiet, because they are spaced out and tired from all that cribbing.

    We had one TB broodmare that was that kind of cribber and, even in standing heat, the stallion had to go to her post to breed her, because she was not going to quit cribbing to go visit with him and get bred.
    She was a Princequillo mare, wonderful mare otherwise and her foals were, no surprise, cribbers when young, but still good runners.

    There is cribbing and there is over the top cribbing and many cribbers end up being the second kind, sadly.



  3. #43
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 1999
    Location
    Clayton, CA USA
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    5,249

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    You are also lucky she is a very mild cribber.
    I have seen more that crib all the time, will take one hour to it a bit of grain because they crib more than they eat.
    They crib on the rope when you tie them to saddle them, will try to crib on a fence post when you get off to open a gate and turned out will stand by a fence post, cribbing on it, all day long, while others come and go, graze and nap.

    When you ride them, those horses are very quiet, because they are spaced out and tired from all that cribbing.

    We had one TB broodmare that was that kind of cribber and, even in standing heat, the stallion had to go to her post to breed her, because she was not going to quit cribbing to go visit with him and get bred.
    She was a Princequillo mare, wonderful mare otherwise and her foals were, no surprise, cribbers when young, but still good runners.

    There is cribbing and there is over the top cribbing and many cribbers end up being the second kind, sadly.
    I can appreciate how you feel about cribbing. I must say, I'm not sure if I would care that the horse was tired from cribbing; that is probably better than the lunge till you drop other method of getting the horse tired. My theory about cribbing is that it is used to relieve stress and can calm a horse (those endorphins) who might otherwise act out in other ways. I have probably been lucky with my horse. I have known a few others, one an OTTB who was much more determined and in the process, wore down his front teeth. However, he made into an outstanding event horse who could have gone very far, had not his teenaged rider lost interest. Another I knew I took on a layup for six months. He was a show horse and had lived in his stall his entire life. He came with a spiked collar. I turned him out in a herd and he never cribbed again the entire time he was here. I don't think this ending is common, but it happens. For me, a total deal breaker is a weaver. It absolutely drives me nuts.
    Mystic Owl Sporthorses
    www.mysticowlsporthorses.com



  4. #44
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2008
    Location
    Virginia
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    1,378

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    Quote Originally Posted by WildandWickedWarmbloods View Post
    No. A 12 yr old child does not need a cribber. An experienced adult who knows what she is getting into, can handle a cribber.
    The only thing an experienced adult might need to help a 12 year old with is showing her how to put on the collar correctly.

    DD's first horse, who we got when she was 11, is a cribber and is the best horse we have ever had - safe, sane, talented and as solid a citizen as you could ever find. I never worried one moment when DD was on him - trusted him more than I have ever trusted a horse and he never let me down.

    That said, he is a horrible cribber who would crib on a pasture mate if they would let him. He wears a miracle collar 24/7/365 and its a non issue.



  5. #45
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2003
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    Thanks for all your feedback. I really appreciate the different opinions and it has raised a few more thoughts for me. I have just found out that apparently the mare also had colic surgery about 4 years ago. Hasn't coliced since and apparently recovered very quickly.



  6. #46
    Join Date
    Jul. 17, 2009
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    south eastern US
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    The first horse I bought for my then 9 year old daughter was a cribber. He was one of those horses that is worth his weight in gold. He'd been there/done that and was patient and kind. I couldn't have given her a better horse for that time in her life. He was a confidence builder for sure. I would go back and buy him again in the same time/place/situation.....However, the kid is now 29 years old and the horse is long dead (put down due to colic when he was 21 yo). I have vowed to never own another cribber. There are enough horses out there suitable for my needs that I need not bring another cribber home.
    "My biggest fear is that when I die my husband is going to try to sell all my horses and tack for what I told him they cost."



  7. #47
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2009
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    Rock Chalk!
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    Quote Originally Posted by SLW View Post
    I can replace stall boards but not my daughter.

    If everything else was perfect with the horse then cribbing would not stop me.
    I agree totally. I wouldn't think twice about a horse who cribs. My jumper cribbed. DD's first pony was nippy. But both were worth their weight in gold in every other way.

    Every horse out there has some "issue" to deal with. Some ship or clip badly, others have crummy feet, need maintenance, etc. Some aren't friendly with other horses or people or dogs or whatever. It's up to the owner to decide if that horse's issue is a deal-breaker for them or not.
    A proud friend of bar.ka.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #48
    Join Date
    May. 13, 2008
    Location
    Western MA
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    611

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    If they're keeping this horse at home, is the barn within a distance where the cribbing would bother them while in the house? If they're first-time horse owners, I think that before presenting the horse to them you need to be honest with Mom and let her know what cribbing can mean - and the amount of upkeep it could require.

    Is the horse controlled when wearing a collar, or does she just crib less? Right now, I'd run screaming from a cribber. We have an obsessive one downstairs (I live above the barn - and NO, he was not here when I moved in - I would never have agreed to move in if there had been a cribber here). Anyway, he cannot be stopped (we've tried everything) and he's driving me absolutely nuts. Having seen the destruction that he's bringing to the place, and the amount of things that need to be fixed or replaced because of him, I would not ever suggest a horse who cribs (at least like he does) to a new horse owner, especially not to one who will be keeping him at home.

    But, if the mare isn't a bad cribber....possibly.



  9. #49
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2005
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    between the mountains and the sea, North Carolina
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    I'd never say never. I know some cribbers who don't bother me, but have met some who destroy everything within reach even with a collar. It would not be a deal breaker.
    "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
    "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey



  10. #50
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by x View Post
    If the horse is suitable in every other way, the cribbing shouldn't necessarily be that off-putting. For a first horse, you want sane, safe, and well-trained. It sounds like this horse is that--I'd say go for it.
    This!


    Now the update about the colic surgery might be a bigger wrench in the purchasing idea.



  11. #51
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2011
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    southeast Georgia
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    If the cribbing can be controlled with a strap and the horse is suitable otherwise, I'd buy it.
    I heard a neigh. Oh, such a brisk and melodious neigh as that was! My very heart leaped with delight at the sound. --Nathaniel Hawthorne



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