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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 10, 2007
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    too far from the barn
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    5,647

    Default Which end of the horse buying spectrum are you on

    Me - I never have to look very long to find a horse. They keep falling in my lap. My biggest challenge is not buying waaaay too many (it goes without saying that I buy too many). I often buy without personal visit, sometimes without video, most pass the vet with flying colors and most work out for the intended goals

    Others - look for months (or even years), travel all over, get videos of everything, have multiple horses with unacceptable vet checks and have great difficulty finding a horse

    Which end are you on?
    OTTBs rule, but spots are good too!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 4, 2009
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    MD
    Posts
    4,111

    Default

    Speed buyer takes me 30 seconds to know whip out check book or cash n get er done...very seldom buyers remorse or regret and yup way to many..


    3 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2005
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    PA
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    12,835

    Default

    Same as you....if it takes me two weeks of looking, that is a long time (I'm not sure it has ever taken me that long....). Most that I've vet, pass the vet. I think I've had two that didn't and that is because I've started xraying backs. I do generally look at them in person though but luckily live in an area with a TON of choices. I'm often looking for green or off the track.


    I have a lot more trouble selling....as I tend to want to keep them all
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 4, 2004
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    2,641

    Default

    Also fast.

    I think it depends on the type of horse you shop for, though. If I were looking for an established eventer and expecting to pay the associated price, there would be a lot more variables to consider and I'd want to make sure I was really getting the right partner.

    I normally shop at the track where you have much less to consider, because so much is still an unknown with those prospects.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2005
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    PA
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    12,835

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beam Me Up View Post
    Also fast.

    I think it depends on the type of horse you shop for, though. If I were looking for an established eventer and expecting to pay the associated price, there would be a lot more variables to consider and I'd want to make sure I was really getting the right partner.

    I normally shop at the track where you have much less to consider, because so much is still an unknown with those prospects.
    Agreed although I don't think I would take very long to find a horse with mileage as well. I think the difference is whether you shop for your "dream" horse....or just a good horse.

    Good horses...ones you can have fun with and learn from....are easy to find. They may or may not end up being a horse you keep forever...but ones you will be happy to have owned. People who are shoping for a "dream" horse or one they think they will keep forever...generally take longer to find the "one".....and honestly, find the shopping more stressful.

    One isn't right or wrong...they are just different approaches to horse buying. Those of us buying for either re-sale or just for some fun projects (who may or may not end up being keepers) I think will be on the quicker end. We know what we like and our important criteria will not be as long a list (or as hard to find) as someone shoping for their "one" dream horse.
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 6, 2013
    Posts
    163

    Default

    I've been shopping since October, still haven't found anything good enough to go look at in person. Doesn't help that MN doesn't have much to look at anyway, at least not in my price range, and if it's in my price range, it has some sort of problem that makes it a throw out.
    "One reason why horses are happy is because they are not trying to impress other horses."
    "Never approach a bull from the front, a horse from the rear, or a fool from any direction"



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 23, 2004
    Location
    Camden, De
    Posts
    3,626

    Default

    Just this year I actually started buying my own resale projects again (didn't want to risk it while we were buying/building the farm up) and I am the type that knows it when I see it I am generally buying horses at the track or just off the track and I make my mind up very quickly often without seeing the horse in person. I am comfortable taking risk and generally I am buying horses that I think I will be able to resale because they fit the market (3-6yr, geldings over 16h, sound, no vices and good conformation that hopefully leads to good movement/jump). I don't worry so much if they fit "me" in terms of what I like to ride. I actually like a hotter type of horse but I try not to buy that if I can avoid it because most people don't enjoy the hotter tb's as much as I do. I often buy without video and without a vet check but I am comfortable with that risk.

    Scubed- I think that when you buy a lot of horses you realize there is no such thing as the perfect horse and you become a lot more comfortable with knowing what you can live with and what is a deal breaker.

    Our two personal horses are probably the biggest pain in the ass horses in terms of ground manners and wierd quirks but they are awesome riding horses. I know I can live with a horse that I really don't like much in the barn as long as they are good to ride. While other people just have one horse and they really want that horse to be their friend.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2012
    Posts
    171

    Default

    speed buyer, bought 2 in last 6 months, sold first one, who was bought as a quick turn around so it worked. Current one was free, took him off a pic and his pedigree.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2009
    Location
    PA
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    1,234

    Default

    If all I do is "window shop" on CANTER and dreamhorse.com, imagining what I'd do if there was money in the bank, where does that put me on the spectrum?
    If it were easy, everybody would do it.

    Equi-Sport Services


    6 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 10, 2007
    Location
    down south
    Posts
    5,060

    Default

    Always have been a speed buyer. Horses I have known and I bought them. Always worked out, yet when I had to retire my last one it took me a year. Had one vetted, didn't pass. One set up for vetting and someone at the barn bought him because their daughter got upset he was leaving and then looked at a bunch of crazies. Finally, about a year later I found my horse and love him dearly.
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2000
    Location
    Durham/Chapel Hill nc
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    3,712

    Default

    'nother speed buyer here, wondering how many of us speed buyers have our own place versus how many board?? While I know I'm signing up for variable costs and likely vet bills when I buy one, somehow not having to add another board bill to the pile helps enable me. I have bought off a phone vetting, after no vetting, and after unloading a 3 legged lame pony from the trailer at a vetting. Since he had been sound when I loaded him, I asked her to check the other 3 legs and his heart, and I bought him... They have all been fabulous, btw.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 22, 2012
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    816

    Default

    Horse shopping takes FOREVER for me. I'll spend months searching, digging through ads, driving to hell and gone, and vetting the rare few who are up to snuff, and usually come up emptyhanded. On the plus side, I've wound up with really nice horses that I know are exactly what I need. On the downside, it takes AGES.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug. 4, 2009
    Location
    MD
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    I have my own place and tend to buy the same horse...not necessarily color or sex but same general type in silhouette..3 to 6 yr OTTB preferring geldings or colts 15.3 up clean straight correct with that athletic walk and uphill build....my personal keepers are all different in ride size temperament....I bought my Rock Hard Ten gelding sight unseen until I arrived to pick him up.Pedigree can sway me and when a stud fee is 120k you figure it can t be all that bad....wink grin...and a few trainers who know my taste just call and say van is on its way send a check....



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct. 22, 2001
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    5,167

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    Quote Originally Posted by bornfreenowexpensive View Post
    Good horses...ones you can have fun with and learn from....are easy to find. They may or may not end up being a horse you keep forever...but ones you will be happy to have owned. People who are shopping for a "dream" horse or one they think they will keep forever...generally take longer to find the "one".....and honestly, find the shopping more stressful.
    This. If more buyers would make it a mantra while shopping, they'd end up with well-suited horses sooner and would likely be happier in the long run. I feel like I've said it on a number of occasions, but with horses, perfect is the enemy of the good.

    In that vein, I've tended to buy relatively quickly. Maybe I've just been lucky, but I've been pleasantly surprised by how many quite nice horses are out there at all levels, from dead green four year olds to going Prelim and above. The prices may range depending on who is selling them, and I'm sure I've both overpaid and found some bargains, but either way, I've been lucky to own a number of horses who weren't "perfect" but were still awfully nice critters. They weren't all gorgeous athletic specimens, but they all have fit the need I wanted at the time, and made up into decent, willing, able beasts.

    'Course, my Advanced horse was one that Scubed found in a silo in Minnesota (my criteria at the time was that I wanted color, I wanted cheap, and I wanted it to jump anything in front of it, and I didn't care about anything else). So I might be a bit biased toward the fairy tale/come from nowhere champion saga to begin with - though goodness knows none of us would've thought he was going to do much of anything until he went Intermediate.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2012
    Posts
    259

    Default

    I'd say I'm on the slow end. I am not in a position where I can afford to have handfuls of horses at a time, so for most of my life I've only owned one or two at a time. So with that, a lot of careful selection goes into those select one or two!



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2005
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    PA
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    Default

    I now have my own place....which is really really dangerous...but before, I boarded. Didn't seem to slow me down.....and I've still been very happy with all that I've bought.
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct. 22, 2009
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    2,893

    Default

    I think it's different if you are buying prospects to sell (judybigredpony etc) or are a very good rider (bornfreenowexpensive etc) than if you are a non-talented, limited fund, low level ammie. If I don't get along with a horse, I don't have the skill or desire to make it work, nor do I have the money or facilities to either take a loss and sell the horse or buy a more suitable horse. So no, I wouldn't buy a horse without having a good idea of what I'm buying, and making sure it matches my goals and riding ability.

    With that said, most of the horses I've bought just happened to be in the barn when I needed something to ride. However, only 2 of those 5 have worked out, both of which I currently own. It was not fun having to try and make it work with horses I didn't not get along with, and it wasn't really fair to the horses or me, not too mention the waste of time and money until the horses were eventually sold. In the future, I will take my time. Not to find the 'dream horse', but to be sure I'm not making a poor decision for the convenience of a quick purchase.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan. 6, 2013
    Posts
    163

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    Quote Originally Posted by Big_Grey_hunter View Post
    I think it's different if you are buying prospects to sell (judybigredpony etc) or are a very good rider (bornfreenowexpensive etc) than if you are a non-talented, limited fund, low level ammie. If I don't get along with a horse, I don't have the skill or desire to make it work, nor do I have the money or facilities to either take a loss and sell the horse or buy a more suitable horse. So no, I wouldn't buy a horse without having a good idea of what I'm buying, and making sure it matches my goals and riding ability.

    With that said, most of the horses I've bought just happened to be in the barn when I needed something to ride. However, only 2 of those 5 have worked out, both of which I currently own. It was not fun having to try and make it work with horses I didn't not get along with, and it wasn't really fair to the horses or me, not too mention the waste of time and money until the horses were eventually sold. In the future, I will take my time. Not to find the 'dream horse', but to be sure I'm not making a poor decision for the convenience of a quick purchase.
    Yeah, that's basically me too!
    "One reason why horses are happy is because they are not trying to impress other horses."
    "Never approach a bull from the front, a horse from the rear, or a fool from any direction"



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2010
    Location
    Tucson
    Posts
    6,199

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    I bought my TB about 6 months before I meant to buy a horse, and bought the new filly about a year to 3 years ahead of plan.... I was looking around to see options, and had been following my filly from 3 months to 2 & 3 months when I bought her, so while I knew I loved her I wasn't looking yet. Finally got to the point I said f- plans, I had known I loved her all along and had the chance to get her, so I did.
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2006
    Location
    Seattle, WA
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    5,460

    Default

    I don't think the two are mutually exclusive.

    I will only take a horse that "falls into my lap." Sometimes that means making a 10 minute decision with no vet (or other) assistance, but sometimes it means passing on a lot of "not quite right" fits (not to be confused with NQR horses!) while waiting for the right circumstances to happen. Somehow, though, I always have a full barn

    So my answer to your question is that I take things as they come. I'm willing to make a snap/gut decision if everything falls in place quickly, but I'm not willing to *make* a sale happen if even one factor doesn't add up. I call it the "I am one with the wind" buying methodology Hasn't failed me yet!
    __________________________________
    Forever exiled in the NW.


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