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  1. #1
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    Default BYOD - Bring your own gadget to school

    It's a new thing our school district is gunning for for next school year, I understand other schools have already implemented it.


    I do detest the idea. We are already breeding a generation that has problems dealing with items that have no on-switch...this initiative is not going to help!

    On the other hand, I can see were the schools are just doing the age old thing there : If you can' beat them, join them.

    The smartphones are already in school.

    I just found it laughable that the chair lady from the Bord of Education, who just recently found out what idk means, thinks she can control what the kids will be doing with their iPhones and iPads....
    (yeah, the whole presentation was a big Apple commercial...)

    One gentleman stood up and did ask them why they were insisting on dumbing down the students. Another guy was wondering about the security, as his kids have issues and don't do as they are told (they had a label, so it's all good)


    Then again... if the kids bring powered up devices to school, they might have something to do during a power outage than to sit in the gym waiting for it to be restored.....


    yep, that's why I love books...they work by candle light.....


    (and now I have 6 month to worry what gadget the kids gets, since his laptop has seen better days...and is not really portable when you already ahve a book bag full and an instrument to worry about)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  2. #2
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    The only big plus I see for BYOD is that the digital editions of textbooks are much cheaper and hopefully, schools will be able to sign contracts that get them the digital version of the most up to date text-- instead of using ones 10-15 years old.

    That said, I don't understand how the schools can make a parent pay $500+ for a device for their child. At private school we had to buy a laptop (and this was a decade ago, so laptops were not $300 like now...) but that was private. Is this a public school?



  3. #3
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    I brought a laptop to high school for note taking and it didn't make me a terrible citizen.
    "I'm not always sarcastic. Sometimes I'm asleep."
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    Horse Isle 2: Legend of the Esrohs LifeCycle Breeding and competition MMORPG


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  4. #4
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    It really would depend on how the teachers utilized it. For example, I would be fine with allowing smartphones, etc., if I were planning to work them into the lesson somehow. Any time I had to give directions or needed focus from students, I'd require them to have the device on the upper right-hand corner of the desk, face down. Actually not too terrible of a system since at least you can see where all the devices are, rather than having a kid trying to hide it under the desk.

    If you keep things so structured and focused that they don't have time to play around, then having the devices in class is fine. If you don't have the structure and focus there to begin with, kids that currently have a five-second attention span aren't going to have the self-control to impose focus on themselves.
    "Remain relentlessly cheerful."

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  5. #5
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    Default

    Seems like this could turn into a class/financial issue with haves and have-nots.
    Delicious strawberry flavored death!


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  6. #6
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    High school kids are already texting the answers to tests, during tests. Stucture, should be of course, but that's not always the case. Additionally, at our school we weren't even allowed to ask the parents to send paper and pencils for their kids. I can't imagine requiring something electronic!



  7. #7
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    My daughter is in 5th grade, and they are allowed to bring their electronics to school. They are used in the lessons, which I think is great. But, I think it really shows who has what and there is already the mine is better then yours thing going on in this area big time. I am fortunate that my kids have decent tablets, but a lot around here are not, and I feel it is unfair. It really helps the poor know they are poor. Having been that poor kid when I was in school I can understand how they must feel.



  8. #8
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    we were assured that the school would have some devices on hand, but buying for the whole school would eat the operating budget for one whole month. Not something they can agree upon easily (nor would it be wise)

    Plus of course, I am sure they will treat them better when they are not publicly owned but their own.

    I am not too thrilled, as I have mentioned....but I guess it's up to me to try to impress the use of low tech options onto my child.

    Now I am looking into options to replace the laptop he has worn out...He will need something more portable, since he already has band and the instrument won't be replaced by a tablet....I love band.....
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  9. #9
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    The digital editions of textbooks are not going to be cheaper.

    The textbook companies will instead sell licenses, and schools will have to purchase one every year per seat. The textbook companies will price it similarly to buying a new textbook every 5 years.

    Currently, schools can opt to wait to adopt/purchase new books to match their own financial and curricular needs. With digital editions, they will not be able to do so, not to save money, not to stay on a curriculum that they are trained for and like.

    The expense of the new books is not just in the books - it is also in the new trainings that teachers must attend every time the books change.
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket


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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by poltroon View Post
    The digital editions of textbooks are not going to be cheaper.

    The textbook companies will instead sell licenses, and schools will have to purchase one every year per seat. The textbook companies will price it similarly to buying a new textbook every 5 years.

    Currently, schools can opt to wait to adopt/purchase new books to match their own financial and curricular needs. With digital editions, they will not be able to do so, not to save money, not to stay on a curriculum that they are trained for and like.

    The expense of the new books is not just in the books - it is also in the new trainings that teachers must attend every time the books change.
    Well, I can only speak for when I was in college, in which the multi-year license for a very expensive book (like my basic biology textbook, used for 3 semesters worth of classes) still added up to about 60% of the cost of the book itself. And was much easier to carry, since I could print just the parts I needed to actually bring with me. This was many years ago, I do not know if the digital model has changed since then.



  11. #11
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    I am pretty skeptical of BOYD for schools.

    First, if devices are part of learning... then every child needs one. Every. Child.
    Free of charge.

    Second, the labor involved to secure the random devices kids bring in is substantial, especially given that they are all running different hardware and software. Does your school have a dedicated IT staff? In private industry, you'd generally have a dedicated IT person for every 50-100 users, with a minimum staff of 3. That suggests we should probably have an IT person for every two classrooms. (My (small) local district does not have any full time IT people.)

    We also need to work on getting broadband to every school in America (our school got broadband last year; plenty of others don't have it) and then working on broadband access for every community. You can't assign homework in an online system if the kids don't have adequate internet at home.

    There are other issues, too. Our school building was constructed in the 1960s. There is not adequate electrical capacity to charge a device for every student. It's not just a matter of plugs, and getting them to desks, but a matter of amps.
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket


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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by soloudinhere View Post
    Well, I can only speak for when I was in college, in which the multi-year license for a very expensive book (like my basic biology textbook, used for 3 semesters worth of classes) still added up to about 60% of the cost of the book itself. And was much easier to carry, since I could print just the parts I needed to actually bring with me. This was many years ago, I do not know if the digital model has changed since then.
    The model for college, and the issues for college, are somewhat different than those for K-12. K-12 is a much more captive market. For colleges, your instructor can choose not to have a textbook or to write his own textbook if he likes.
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



  13. #13
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    Default

    Second, the labor involved to secure the random devices kids bring in is substantial, especially given that they are all running different hardware and software. Does your school have a dedicated IT staff?
    place I work has now banned BYOD- because of security issues, and problems with compatibility. They decided it was easier and worked better to have the company supply all of the devices. They used to let people use tablets and home computers and smartphones to access the company network, but no longer. And we have a dedicated IT staff.



  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by poltroon View Post
    I am pretty skeptical of BOYD for schools.

    First, if devices are part of learning... then every child needs one. Every. Child.
    Free of charge.

    Second, the labor involved to secure the random devices kids bring in is substantial, especially given that they are all running different hardware and software. Does your school have a dedicated IT staff? In private industry, you'd generally have a dedicated IT person for every 50-100 users, with a minimum staff of 3. That suggests we should probably have an IT person for every two classrooms. (My (small) local district does not have any full time IT people.)

    We also need to work on getting broadband to every school in America (our school got broadband last year; plenty of others don't have it) and then working on broadband access for every community. You can't assign homework in an online system if the kids don't have adequate internet at home.

    There are other issues, too. Our school building was constructed in the 1960s. There is not adequate electrical capacity to charge a device for every student. It's not just a matter of plugs, and getting them to desks, but a matter of amps.
    good point.
    The elementary school actually is well equipped, thanks to federal funds (finally some good the feds do, pouring $$ into early education)

    Middle and high school are a bit SOL...
    While at least one school in the system had it implemented last year, our school is going for next year, so come fall...it was promised that the devices would not be needed for homework....since it is to be expected that not all will have one or will be allowed to bring it (a friend of mine will likely not let her kids bring the electronics to school)
    The teachers will used the rest of the school year and the summer to train up in the technology and train the rest of the staff.
    I think we have a dedicated IT person, but I could (likely) be mistaken.

    one parent brought up the point that we teach our kids to depend on the gadgets - which I agree - and that probably most kids could no longer research their subject matters in the library without smart phones, and I tend to agree with him on that as well, having encountered too many people in the last few years who live on FB but can't google to save their lives....
    Last edited by Alagirl; Feb. 20, 2013 at 01:18 AM. Reason: it's live, not lie...though that's possible...
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  15. #15
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    As a middle school (public) teacher, electronics--smartphones, Ipads, Ipods, laptops are IN the buildings and being utilized for research, writing, geography, history, math, PE, music and art--you name it! Teachers use email and texting to post lessons and tests.

    In our building, it is "bring it at your own risk"---stolen or lost, too bad. During tests (class, school or state) all electronics are collected before testing. Surprisingly, most teachers are quite adept at seeing kids text, much to the kid's wonder may I add.

    There are lots of very neat apps, programs and sites that can add to a child's education. The world HAS changed since you were in school, parents. Your kids are being taught using methods and materials you didn't have access to. What can you do to help them? Teach them to be discerning consumers of information from the Internet--it ain't all true! Youtube is not a reliable source, neither is Facebook, or most blogs. Wikipedia is getting better and better, but ask.com sucks.

    Many districts are not buying text books, but instead, are going with Ipads and kids are using primary documents found on the internet (think the actual constitution rather than a textbook about it).

    Is there a divide between those who do and don't have smartphones? Sure, but it never ceases to amaze me how many kids (and our school has 49% free/reduced lunch, so quite high poverty level) already have a smartphone or Ipod. Add Wifi from school for free and you're in like Flynn!
    Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!


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  16. #16
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    I think my daughter's school decided "if you can't beat 'em, join 'em" with regard to phones and other electronics in school. So they can have them and use them for classwork and for texting between classes.

    For the OP, I bought my daughter a used Iphone 4 from a friend who was upgrading to a 5. The Walmart Straight Talk plan has a sim card that can be used in the Iphone 4 and 4S for under $15. The Straight Talk unlimited everything plan costs $45/mo. I paid $125 for the phone. That is the cheapest way that I've found to get DD the phone she wanted in a way that I could afford.



  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post
    one parent brought up the point that we teach our kids to depend on the gadgets - which I agree - and that probably most kids could no longer research their subject matters in the library without smart phones, and I tend to agree with him on that as well, having encountered too many people in the last few years who lie on FB but can't google to save their lives....
    Google and the internet really up the ante and change the nature of research, and what is possible.

    My daughter had a research project on the Sphinx of Egypt. In my day, I would have gone to the library, checked out every book that mentioned the Sphinx, and been limited to the few pages that each provided. We did that. But the internet let her ask questions that she was interested in, and actually find answers. Like, "Why is it called the Sphinx?"

    (Reading this casually, you may not appreciate that it turns out to be rather a profound question about how it is that an Egyptian monument is known by the western world using a name from Greek mythology.)

    She was able to read websites dedicated to the Sphinx and its history and trivia, rather than being restricted to the library collection. She found pictures of it buried in sand. She found pictures of it taken from the local Pizza Hut. :-) As a result, the paper she was able to write was substantially more in-depth than I would have been able to write, because of the sources she had.

    It changes things.

    We still need to teach kids how to use reference books, and the need to read critically and to put together a consistent and authoritative picture of the sources you have is more important than ever.

    All that said: computers are just a tool. They are not magic, they do not replace people, and they don't save money. But they change what we do, and what is possible, with the people we have.
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket


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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Calvincrowe View Post
    What can you do to help them? Teach them to be discerning consumers of information from the Internet--it ain't all true! Youtube is not a reliable source, neither is Facebook, or most blogs. Wikipedia is getting better and better, but ask.com sucks.
    Books never were either, as any of us who were voracious horse-book readers can attest!
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



  19. #19
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    In California, it would not be legal to require parents to buy any kind of device nor internet access for K-12 kids. A free public education must be free. This is written in our State constitution.

    For those of you in other states, I would urge you to advocate for kids whose families cannot or will not purchase devices. It's neither right nor productive to increase the divide between haves and have-nots in school.

    I would also encourage you to attend meetings where this is discussed and make sure they have their ducks in a row, and that they're adding devices for a sound educational reason with adequate infrastructure support and training. Otherwise, they are a distraction and a boondoggle.

    http://blog.al.com/breaking/2012/09/...igital_in.html
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by soloudinhere View Post
    Well, I can only speak for when I was in college, in which the multi-year license for a very expensive book (like my basic biology textbook, used for 3 semesters worth of classes) still added up to about 60% of the cost of the book itself. And was much easier to carry, since I could print just the parts I needed to actually bring with me. This was many years ago, I do not know if the digital model has changed since then.
    We resell all textbooks and for most (like that bio book) I get pretty much 90% of the the used price back. Not bad. 10% to rent a textbook.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



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