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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2006
    Location
    ONTARIO CANADA
    Posts
    1,503

    Default Tattoo help me choose!

    Ok im notconservative at all! Omg got the idea of a blue/ purple butterfly with cherri blossoms for my nekkid forearm

    For my leg/ankle area

    Thinking shenron or vegeta from dragon ball z?

    Yes im a crazy fangirl,

    Oh should they be on opposing leg/arm? Eta to ask
    Beyond the Ring-para dressage, training, coaching
    www.facebook.com/btrparadressage

    Proud Team Four Star Minion! Renegade for Life!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    17,754

    Default

    Don't get me wrong: I am pro tattoo. I have over ten hours of work on my body. I love my tattoos.

    But my advice to ANYONE who wants one is to wait on it. Give it six months (which, frankly, you'll need anyway, to get in with a truly excellent artist) and if you're still in love with the design and the placement after that, full speed ahead.

    I'd also advise getting the work in a place you can easily hide, unless you're really, really sure that you want to present that image to the world all the time. Whether it's fair or not, people will judge you based on what they see.

    Here's a list of really good artists: http://www.compunction.org/tattoos.html


    4 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2012
    Location
    Area IX
    Posts
    369

    Default

    If its small and goes in an easy place to hide, I say go for it.
    But I'm going to second what Simkie said. Find an artist, think about it and make sure that he draws up EXACTLY what you want.

    My first tattoo I went all out and now have a huge, unfinished full sleeve.
    While I LOVE my tattoo, it was hard to adjust to going from bare arms to a sleeve. The other thing is that tattoos are addicting, and expensive. I haven't gotten my tattoo worked on in over a year because I haven't had the money to finish it.
    Eventers of the West
    A Facebook group I created for Eventers in the West Region of the U.S.
    Remy - My OTTB Gelding! Love him to pieces!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2006
    Location
    ONTARIO CANADA
    Posts
    1,503

    Default

    Thanks, oh its been more like a few years, the latter will be big due to it well being a dragon lol that can be hidden!

    My arm for some reason i feel like i need something special there, i know what images tattoos project but i plan on working in coroners and homicide.

    Im not one to care who thinks what of me for wanting obvious tattoos thier for me to enjoy!

    Rant over heheh

    Oh this is gonna cost mega $$$ i definitely want someone like say ami james to do them!!!(oo please??)
    Beyond the Ring-para dressage, training, coaching
    www.facebook.com/btrparadressage

    Proud Team Four Star Minion! Renegade for Life!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2008
    Location
    Ottawa,Ontario
    Posts
    1,699

    Default

    Hi N. Cool that you want a tattoo. My best advice would be to sit on the idea for awhile, maybe even pop into some local shops and look at artist portfolios. Ami isn't the only tattooer out there there are lots of good artists in your area. I have about 60+ hours of work on my body, and even I still take the time to think things out before rushing in to more ink. Maybe even focus on a small one on your ankle to start. Having one on your forearm means you will have to look at that tattoo every day for the rest of your life. You might not always be a crazy fangirl, and may regret your choice later on.
    "My doctrine is this, that if we see cruelty or wrong that we have the power to stop, and do nothing, we make ourselves sharers in the guilt.”
    ― Anna Sewell


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    43,132

    Default

    Just remember, when it doubt, don't.

    Especially with something important and permanent, wait until you are sure and double sure, before you go on with it.
    You will have a long life afterwards to regret it, if later that was not what you then want.

    The world is changing very fast, don't count on being a fan of anything all your life.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 12, 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    7,197

    Default

    Pro-tattoo here as well, with one big one and many smaller ones, all of which I still love. A few pieces of advice:

    1.) Almost every single person I know with a butterfly tattoo regrets it...why? Because EVERYONE ELSE has a cheesy butterfly tattoo as well. Why get something to express your individuality that, uh, everyone else chooses to express their individuality? If you do not go to a really good artist, they also tend to look spectacularly trashy.

    2.) A repeat from above: Almost every single person I know who got some sort of "trademarked" image regrets it....these could be things like cartoon characters, logos, etc. I know a 40 year old woman with a tattoo of Tinkerbell. She doesn't hate it, but she certainly doesn't show it to people and if removal were cheaper she would get it removed--it doesn't say the right things about her anymore, and she got it when really young.

    3.) At least for your first tattoo, I would either not get something where it cannot be easily hidden, or I would not go with a large one. Get something smaller, in a private area, and give yourself a year to adjust to the fact that it will never be coming off your body, and THEN start thinking about larger or more visible ones.

    4.) Spend the money on a fantastic artist. There is nothing worse than a bad tattoo.

    5.) This is just my personal opinion, but I think tattoos should mean something, or stand for something. (Besides your love of cartoons.) That way, when you're 75 and wrinkled, and your grandkids are going "Grandma, what's this ugly blotch on your shoulder?" you can say "Well sweetie, that was a tattoo that I got to commemorate such-and-such, and it reminds me of it every time I see it." Not: "Well sweetie, when I was 22 I thought it would be really awesome to have a giraffe tattoo just because.....make good life choices!"

    Like I said, I have many tattoos myself, in love with them all, planning more. But I've spent a solid two years thinking about my tattoos, and have discarded ideas that I spent a year thinking I wanted. I have a hunch that neither of your tattoo ideas are going to mean anything to you within a year or two.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2009
    Posts
    553

    Default

    When I got my tattoo, I sat on the idea for a year. And it's very simple. Make sure you wait it out- your idea may change over the year into something different!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2012
    Location
    MS Gulf Coast
    Posts
    639

    Default

    I sat on my tattoo idea for a year as well. I had to make sure I really wanted it where I thought it should go. Its on my lower back (prancing horse) but that's where it fit. The flow wouldn't have been right anywhere else.

    I'm planning my next one, and its been in progress for 2 years now. One of these days I'll figure out where to put it.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Georgia
    Posts
    16,871

    Default

    Whatever you choose, plan it's location carefully. What is now taut, young skin will one day be taken over by gravity.
    <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- Being negative only makes a difficult journey more difficult. You may be given a cactus, but you don't have to sit on it.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 1, 2007
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    4,728

    Default

    Consider this scenario: You're 80 years old, holding a grandchild on your lap. They point to a mark on your skin and ask "What is this?"

    Explain to them, at 80 years old, your Dragonball Z tattoo.
    People call themselves animal lovers, then let their dogs chase the squirrels. You're scaring the shit out of the squirrels, you schmuck!


    3 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2005
    Location
    between the mountains and the sea, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,936

    Default

    What simkie said. I have a tattoo & I love it, but I waited, and waited, and waited some more. I went through a few designs in my head. I saw a number of my friends go to the same tattoo artist and liked everything he did for them. I told my ultra conservative when it comes to things like this bff about the plan and she said "as long as you go somewhere hygienic & are sensible, go for it." I love my tattoo - its the flower of Scotland, a thistle, on my ankle & have no regrets whatsoever. My Dad wasn't thrilled, but he got over it.

    Definitely consider how you'll feel about it in 20, 30, 40, and 50 years time. Though as the older female volunteer who was living with us when we got ours said, by that time they'll probably be some fancy laser technique to get rid of them if you want, lol. FWIW, she loved my tattoo :-D.

    I've been sitting on my 2nd one for over a year - still want it but can't decide where.
    "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
    "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 10, 2008
    Location
    Western NY
    Posts
    5,945

    Default

    As another person who is pro-tattoo and has multiple tattoos, I agree with the others that say to perhaps wait, think about what you want and do your research on artists.

    No offense, but you sound young--I don't dislike the tattoo I got when I was eighteen, but I would have designed it a little differently and gone to a better artist, because it hasn't held up as well and needed a lot of retouching. The ones I got from an artist I really love have held up much better.

    One piece of advice is to put up the design on a piece of paper next to your bed and see if you still like to look at it every day for a year.
    "Remain relentlessly cheerful."

    Graphite/Pastel Portraits



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2012
    Location
    Area IX
    Posts
    369

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GoForAGallop View Post
    Pro-tattoo here as well, with one big one and many smaller ones, all of which I still love. A few pieces of advice:

    1.) Almost every single person I know with a butterfly tattoo regrets it...why? Because EVERYONE ELSE has a cheesy butterfly tattoo as well. Why get something to express your individuality that, uh, everyone else chooses to express their individuality? If you do not go to a really good artist, they also tend to look spectacularly trashy.

    2.) A repeat from above: Almost every single person I know who got some sort of "trademarked" image regrets it....these could be things like cartoon characters, logos, etc. I know a 40 year old woman with a tattoo of Tinkerbell. She doesn't hate it, but she certainly doesn't show it to people and if removal were cheaper she would get it removed--it doesn't say the right things about her anymore, and she got it when really young.

    3.) At least for your first tattoo, I would either not get something where it cannot be easily hidden, or I would not go with a large one. Get something smaller, in a private area, and give yourself a year to adjust to the fact that it will never be coming off your body, and THEN start thinking about larger or more visible ones.

    4.) Spend the money on a fantastic artist. There is nothing worse than a bad tattoo.

    5.) This is just my personal opinion, but I think tattoos should mean something, or stand for something. (Besides your love of cartoons.) That way, when you're 75 and wrinkled, and your grandkids are going "Grandma, what's this ugly blotch on your shoulder?" you can say "Well sweetie, that was a tattoo that I got to commemorate such-and-such, and it reminds me of it every time I see it." Not: "Well sweetie, when I was 22 I thought it would be really awesome to have a giraffe tattoo just because.....make good life choices!"

    Like I said, I have many tattoos myself, in love with them all, planning more. But I've spent a solid two years thinking about my tattoos, and have discarded ideas that I spent a year thinking I wanted. I have a hunch that neither of your tattoo ideas are going to mean anything to you within a year or two.
    This.
    Eventers of the West
    A Facebook group I created for Eventers in the West Region of the U.S.
    Remy - My OTTB Gelding! Love him to pieces!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr. 25, 2000
    Posts
    9,033

    Default

    I waited until I was 31 to get my first tattoo. I have wanted one since I was in college, but set my "goal" to wait until I was 30... and if I still wanted it, then I'd go for it. I got a small-ish tatt in the hip area, where it's covered unless I want someone to see it. I got it in honor of my heart horse, who passed away a few months after I got the tatt. I do not regret it at all, but am glad I listened to my mother's advice of getting one that would NOT show when wearing a business suit!



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Middleburg, VA
    Posts
    13,345

    Default

    Wait, wait, and wait some more. Look at tattoos and different artists. Look at all the BAD tattoos you can find online. Then wait again.

    I am very thankful I waited as long as I did before I put needle to skin. I LOVE my tattoo. It is perfect and exactly what I wanted and means a lot to me. I have a couple more I would like to get, but I'm still contemplating them and how important the ideas really are to me. My brother told me they would be addictive (they are), and it can be hard for me not to just go in to the shop and say "Eff it! Let's do something!" Thankfully, my reasonable side still keeps me sensible.

    So, wait.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2007
    Location
    Triangle Area, NC
    Posts
    6,723

    Default

    I'm pro tattoo

    I personally wouldn't get dragon ball Z on me, but If that's your passion, then go for it.

    Why a butterfly (symbolizes sacrificial transformation) and cherry blossoms (the mortality of life)?
    www.destinationconsensusequus.com
    chaque pas est fait ensemble



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct. 4, 2010
    Location
    Middle America
    Posts
    618

    Default

    A butterfly tattoo, huh? I can tell you've put a lot of thought into this.
    Whatever.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2002
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    6,002

    Default

    My entire back is covered, but I will suggest you think REALLY long and hard about the forearm and the dragon ball Z idea.
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what
    lies with in us. - Emerson


    2 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2006
    Location
    deep in the CT wilds near...the 200yr flood zone
    Posts
    719

    Default

    Being needle phobic I personally don't have any tattoos, but I like them. I especially like the ones that look like art, rather than a picture. I worked with a guy who looked like Mr. Ultraconservative. Boyscout haircut, doofy glasses and no sense of clothing style. He had the most beautiful dragon tattoo perched on the inside length of his right forearm. It looked alive, with a rainbow of colors and hues that varied as it undulated. His dad got a dragon tattoo when he was in the Navy, so when his ship was going to do runs in the south Pacific he arranged to get one too, in Japan. He said he paid big bucks and over the next two years went for a session let it heal then returned for the next stage. Went five times and regretted he couldn't go back for the sixth when his ship was deployed elsewhere. He intended to eventually take a trip on his own dime to complete the final gold rimming details on the scales. His tattoo by no means looked unfinished and the type of dragon, how many toes it had, its colors all meant something.

    Another guy, again, kind of shy and conservative, had the coolest black tribal Celtic tattoo circling his biceps. It was emotionally significant to him, he didn't go into detail why and didn't mind me admiring the artwork at the end of swim class. Several other members of the class gathered around too. There was subtle scarification within the design, giving it a three dimensional appearance. Gorgeous. He said it took several sessions over a few years till it was complete and the timeline was based on him working up the cash to go again once it was healed.

    The last tattoo story is a woman my DH works with. At a Labor Day picnic a few years ago I admired a tattoo she had on her calf of a rainbow trout being pulled from the water on a fishing line. The perspective was a small fisherman with a fly rod and a wiggling line leading to the large fish that took up the length of her calf, tail wrapping around her Achilles tendon. The details on the rainbow were really good, capturing its coloration and physical appearance accurately. The fisherman wearing a floppy hat, vest and waders, standing in the water by her shin was terrible with none of the attention to detail the fish had. He/she was flat, two dimensional, crude and it was obvious fish were the tattoo artist's forte. The woman spoke of being in a fishing competition and that was the prized Rainbow she won it with, beating her Dad. They had a bet. He footed the bill for the tattoo, it hurt like a son of a bitch, and it took over a month to finish.

    Now IMHO the two guys put something on their body that no matter what happened in their life, careers or how old they became, their tattoos would never be something they regretted. For a bystander it would be this secret surprise when a sleeve was rolled up and you caught a glimpse of it. The woman's tattoo had become dated. She's moved away from home in the interests of her career and doesn't avidly fish anymore (despite her living in an area that has plenty of opportunities to do so) and didn't want to talk about it. Her tattoo takes up the entire outside and back of her lower leg, so if she wears a dress, or shorts, you can't help noticing it. It was obvious she's proud she won the competition, but had a serious chip on her shoulder with the attitude that no one should ask her about the tattoo. I found out later that everyone at the party had asked her about it, annoying her to no end and she regretted exposing it, but because the day was so hot, she didn't want to have to wear pants.

    So by all means *Teddy*, get a tattoo, but aim for what the guys achieved, don't set yourself up to be in the woman's position a few years down the road.
    This it be all wot we want in life, wenn peoples dey loff us. ~ Willem



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