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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 20, 2008
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    639

    Default Photography Peeps....Lenses

    For those of you who dabble around with photography what is your go to lens? I shoot with Canons and I am in the market for some new lenses but it is always so hard to decide what to get since the good ones are pretty expensive.

    I really need something with a wide aperture for low light conditions. (ie- indoors and such). Plus I really love the shallow depth of field they produce. I'm not getting that in any of my photos.

    So, what's your favorite lens and why?
    Hope Blooming- Life with Chronic Pancreatitis

    My blog: Life with Pancreatitis



  2. #2
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    Nov. 29, 2008
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    3,055

    Default

    It's been awhile.... But the 80-200 range F2.8 was always my favorite lens.

    I think the modern equivalent for Canon would be this :
    Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L USM Telephoto Zoom Lens

    This is a $1500 lens..


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
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    Mar. 30, 2007
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    Hollowed out volcano in the South Pacific.
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    My 70-200mm USM IS f2.8 lens stays attached to my 5D Mark 3 and it's my go-to lens for everything. I highly recommend you square away cheese to purchase it if you have a quality Canon DSLR. Since you live near Northern VA, I would advise you to troll on Craigslist DC as there are always people selling Canon gear on there for cash and it's been a boon for me.
    Thus do we growl that our big toes have,
    at this moment, been thrown up from below!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 1999
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    Cypress, near Houston, Texas
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    8,485

    Default

    I agree. THE go-to lens for horse stuff is the 70-200mm f2.8
    Visit Sonesta Farms website at www.sonestafarms.com or our FaceBook page at www.facebook.com/sonestafarms. Also showing & breeding Cavalier King Charles Spaniels.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 10, 2006
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    SF Bay area
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    Default

    Ditto. The L series 7-200 F2.8 is the only lens I will use.
    RoseLane Sporthorses-Westfalen horses and ponies
    Home of Golden State- 2012 Bundeschampion 3yo Pony Stallion
    Home of Golden West - 2013 Reserve Champion Westfalen Pony Stallion Licensing



  6. #6
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    May. 2, 2011
    Location
    Texas
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    Default

    I agree with the other posters- my 70-200mm f2.8 L stays attached to my Canon 40D. I tried the cheaper brands but they just don't come close to the 70-200mm. And as Lex pointed out, search CL for some really good deals on lenses however, if you go to look at one, be sure and take your camera so you can test it yourself.
    "How does it feel to be one of the beautiful people?" Julian Lennon



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 7, 2009
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    66

    Default

    Yup. Another vote for the 70-200mm f2.8 USM IS lens. Not cheap. Even used they are serious money unless you get luckier than I was.
    But great lens in low light conditions, will give you the soft blurred background for portraits. Also gives my wrists tendonitis but hey, that's a small price to pay for awesome photos.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Location
    IL
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    2,528

    Default

    Joining the love train with the L series 70-200 f2.8
    *The Quietman ~ Irish Approved Gr.1 Stallion
    www.windyislesfarms.com
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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2007
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    I'm gonna upgrade to the Mk.2 lens sometime soon but I'm in no hurry as the Mk.1 copy I have seems to be a perfect one and I've gotten some stunning pics with my 5D3 even though the lens is over a decade old.
    Thus do we growl that our big toes have,
    at this moment, been thrown up from below!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 20, 2008
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    639

    Default

    Uhoh. Looks like this is going to set me back pretty good. The two lenses I have are okay, but not anything special. One came with the camera the other was a mid range zoom lens. They do their job but I am missing out on a lot not having more. I KNOW I need a macro lens because I love to shoot those types of pictures. But I need that perfect balance lens for horse pictures, and other various pet and people shots.
    Hope Blooming- Life with Chronic Pancreatitis

    My blog: Life with Pancreatitis



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 4, 2001
    Location
    Sheridan, IN
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    Default

    My 70-200 2.8 lives on my 7D, but I do swap it out pretty regularly with the 24-70 2.8 (L series as well) for closer quarters. I have a 100-400 L series as well, but it's pretty much just used when I need a long reach. I just bought a 100 MM macro 2.8 but haven't gotten a chance to shoot with it a lot yet, but am looking forward to that!



  12. #12
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    Mar. 30, 2007
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    The 70-200 is as good as it gets for all around uses but you have to have enough space to wield it properly or you'll be very frustrated. You also have to learn to master the IS and AF patterns for the lens and whatever camera you are shooting with. I have the 5D3, which is as powerful as it gets for broad AF and shooting just about anything, so it's a lot harder to use than the lesser cameras which have fewer focus points.
    Thus do we growl that our big toes have,
    at this moment, been thrown up from below!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2008
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    1,701

    Default

    What's your budget?

    As others said, the 70-200 f/2.8 is great! I've never been able to afford one, but have had the opportunity to borrow a friend's and I love it! If you want something in the $500 range, the Canon 70-200 4L is also very nice. I have that lens and it's produced some amazing action shots. If you want to do portrait/close up work, get yourself a 50mm f/1.8. The best money I've ever spent on a lens and it's only about $90!



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2003
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    CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by indygirl2560 View Post
    If you want to do portrait/close up work, get yourself a 50mm f/1.8. The best money I've ever spent on a lens and it's only about $90!
    I agree. My 50 mm prime is the best $100 I've spent. I can get really nice portraits with it...and I'm only a mediocre photographer.
    Keith: "Now...let's do something normal fathers and daughters do."
    Veronica: "Buy me a pony?"


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  15. #15
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    Oct. 24, 2001
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    Virginia
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    Quote Originally Posted by RugBug View Post
    I agree. My 50 mm prime is the best $100 I've spent.
    Ditto this. I've got several decent zooms, but if you told me I could only have one lens for ever and ever amen? I'd want that 50mm prime, without a second thought. It does landscapes. It does closeups in dark interiors. It'll even do a nice horse shot Wouldn't trade that lens for the world, especially for travelling, when you don't know what you'll be shooting!
    Last edited by JenEM; Feb. 19, 2013 at 01:14 AM.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
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    Fort Worth, Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by SFrost View Post
    Uh But I need that perfect balance lens for horse pictures, and other various pet and people shots.
    I used a 55mm 1.2 for most everything in normal range, you could push the speeds around and still have a clear image.... close focus range I believe was about 18 inches



  17. #17
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    Nov. 13, 2010
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    Shallow DOF is yes, effected by lens choice, but of you're not getting it in ANY of your photos you need to re-evaluate how well you know your camera. A wide open aperture and getting up close to your subject will always cause shallow DOF. Usually just getting up close will cause it, no matter what your DOF is. Lens choice is also a factor, a telephoto lens is more helpful than a wide angle, but you can still get shallow DOF with a wide angle.

    The lens I shoot with the most is a kit lens, a 55-200mm, only stops down to 4. It's not a super high quality lens, but it has done well for me.
    If you don't already have one, I would strongly recommend a 50mm fixed lens that stops down to 1.4-1.8. A great lens for low light!
    A 50mm prime is my first purchase after I get my new camera body. Ive been shooting with a D60 for years and while it is a great little camera that has let me produce stunning images, I need to move up to be able to shoot at higher ISOs and get a much larger native picture size.



  18. #18
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    Sep. 7, 2006
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    WNY
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    Default

    I almost always shoot with my Canon 100mm f/2 USM lens. It's not even an L lens, and I can tell the difference between it and my cheaper zoom lenses. I'd love to get a wide angle with a large aperture when I have money.

    The 100mm is great for:
    shallow DOF
    portrtaits in low light
    action in daylight
    Against My Better Judgement: A blog about my new FLF OTTB
    Do not buy a Volkswagen. I did and I regret it.
    VW sucks.



  19. #19
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    May. 2, 2011
    Location
    Texas
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    Default

    I've been looking for a lense that allows closeup shots of a fast moving horse (if that makes sense) and have been saving up for the 24-70mm mentioned earlier. So, you all are suggesting the 50mm instead? Thanks for the help!
    "How does it feel to be one of the beautiful people?" Julian Lennon



  20. #20
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    Mar. 16, 2000
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    Chatham, NY USA
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    Default

    The only serious issue with short lenses (under 100+) is that you're going to get distortion if you're not shooting square on perpendicular.

    You can save some $$ by going to an 'off' brand lens. We have an old Tamron midrange that has never done us wrong (28-105, if I recall correctly). And Tamron has some great sounding lenses out now with real stretch. We had horrendous experience with Sigma, but I know others who use them regularly (and those who have had reverse experience with Tamron). Just make sure you're buying US warranty rather than gray-market. Costs a bit more, but worth the security.

    Carol
    www.ayliprod.com
    Equine Photography in the Northeast



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