The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 38 of 38
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2006
    Location
    east central Illinois and working north to the 'burbs
    Posts
    3,836

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Juxtapoze View Post
    Hi Rick - I always appreciate your perspective and expertise. Here's what I can add:

    -hoof conformation: thin-soled/fairly flat footed, does grow long in toes, made good progress getting heels off the ground in the last year, healthy frogs. I couldn't tell you the sole depth since it's been awhile since vet looked at rads and I don't think vet ever gave me an actual number. No evidence of pedal osteitis.
    Those rads form a baseline. Not only should you have a copy of them, you should get the numeric measurments for sole depth from the vet.
    -Shoes: 3/4 inch wide steel, all hooves. Farrier wants to try 1 inch customs next shoeing to provide a little more support.
    What is he trying to support? Further, in light of the thin soles, if he doesn't 'deep seat' the inner edge of the foot surface of the shoe he runs the risk of causing sole bruising. Especially if he is setting the shoe back off the toe or using a heavily rockered toe shoe.
    We haven't tried pads yet since my farrier doesn't like all the crud that can get stuck underneath them, but the vet says it is probably time to give them a try.
    Your farrier might want to consider using two pads /hoof. A full pad next to the shoe and a narrow width(~1/2-2/3 the width of the web) above that(closest to the hoof. This will create a bit of clearance and allow for some hoof packing to go comfortably next to the sole. For hoof packing there are a variety of choices.In cases such as yours, my preference this time of year, is for Hawthorne's (or the like) and oakum in the front half/2/3rds of the hoof and Equipak in the back of the hoof. Absent Hawthorne's or the equivalent, I use a 50/50 mixture of pine tar and venice turpentine painted into the area and then covered with oakum.Once the ground dries up/out, I generally leave the Equipak out and just use the Hawthorne's and oakum under the entire pad.
    Farrier tries to leave as much sole as possible while keeping toe flare to a minimum, but I couldn't speak to how much the shoes get set back, etc. We shoe every 5 weeks.
    IMNTBCHO, you should ask and the farrier should tell you how much the shoe will be set back and how and why that determination was made. Also where will the heels of the shoe be located, and, why.
    -Left Abscess in January: came out outside edge of frog. Right abscess hasn't surfaced yet, but I would bet it comes out around the same spot from where there is a soft spot. Abscesses last spring, two from frogs, one in heel, one in bar region that the vet dug out, none from coronary band.
    I would be very hesitant to cover the sole with a full pad until after the abscess vented.
    -Supplement: Glanzen 3. Been on it a little over a month (started after Left abscess happened). My farrier says he has seen more hoof growth than past shoeings.
    I hear that alot and am puzzled by it. Consider, it takes time for the supplement to build up in the body and get to/affect the hoof. Also, especially this time of year, a hoof will grow 3/8 inch or less. And, since the hoof grows from the top(coronary level) down, I don't understand how there could be much visible growth in that short amount of time
    -Diet: both vets say diet is not an issue when I have provided them with a detailed accounting of his diet.
    Good!
    -Progress in that we had 7 months soundness from June to January, no abscesses, no gimpy days with sore feet.
    So what changed? I'm not trying to be factious here, but you have to determine what changed and why before you can truly remediate it.
    -Circulation: Well, out of the things I can control, I feel like I've covered diet, shoeing/trimming. Trying to do everything I can to help this issue and outside living is one of the few things I haven't tried yet.
    It may help, then again it may not. The conundrum is that you won't know if the horse got better because you turned him out or in spite of your turning him out.
    It will be a happy day when I can say my horse no longer has chronic abscess issues. Thanks again to all for your feedback and support with this frustrating situation.
    It will indeed. De nada.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2008
    Posts
    1,778

    Default

    My Trakehner has thin soles. Or had, anyway. He seemed very susceptible to sole bruising, causing later abcesses, and very sensitive to anything but soft dirt footing.

    These issues came to a head about 6 weeks after he was put into consistent, regular work when I bought him at age 5. Not surprising.

    He is shod all the time, and when I got him just over two years ago, we used thick pads under clip shoes, and he wore bell boots all the time since he still tended to overstride and rip off shoes. Winter he gets snow pads in front, and we put borium on them the first winter. When we started working up the following Spring for LD, I used Equipak with clip shoes, just on the fronts. That Fall he was very physically fit and re-entered Jumper training. We went from Equi-pak to plain leather pads, and then winter came and it was snow pads and borium again. Last Spring we were able to go with no pads, and he's doing very well. No abcesses, hooves seem to be in good balance.
    Lifestyle coordinator for Zora, Spooky, Wolfgang and Warrior



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2010
    Posts
    2,538

    Default

    Personally, I think you're being overly sensitive about your vet's comment, an are reading too much into it. Probably just a flip remark that has a grain of truth to it, and nothing more.

    Have you tried Keratex Hoof Gel to protect his hooves from mud/wet? It's by far the best thing I've used for protecting hooves from excess moisture. And, here we get pretty much a constant monsoon for six straight months every year, so I know what I'm talkin' about.

    I do think more turnout is always best, providing you're using something like KHG to protect from moisture. More movement and circulation is always a good thing (unless the horse is foundering or something, of course). You could also try jiaogulan (www.mybesthorse.com), which can help increase circulation and help abscesses come to a head faster.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Apr. 4, 2006
    Location
    An American Living In Ireland
    Posts
    5,658

    Default

    OP, for my thin soled pancake flat footed mare, I finally just took the shoes off. And before anyone flips, I have some with shoes. It was coming into winter and in HER case the shoes were not helping and I wasn't going the wedges route. She went from a sole you could press on with little pressure to now having rock hard soles. I didn't use any potions and the mare was sound straight away out of shoes. But at the same time we just took the shoes off and did not trim. After a few weeks of remodelling, we could start to trim a little and now after 6 months we're getting that toe back more and more. Gradual changes meant we could build up the caudual area without expecting miracles. The concave of her soles is something she has NEVER had but does now. Yup she has a specific diet. But to be fair I always had a very similar diet that just needing tweaking. I was also doing things to build the hoof such as walking on roads. Can't expect to grow a good foot without allowing it to function in the way intended. This mare was lame in a previous wedge attempt and with pour ins. And I do love pour ins. And before people jump to assumptions I do have a very good blacksmith. Before him her feet were a right mess. My now 18 yo TB who's pretty much retired also is now bare after probably being in fronts since he was 2. All my previous attempts with him failed. Especially when the shoes came off and he was trimmed all nice and neat. He went from having shrivelled up non functioning frogs to them actually coming back to life again.

    But I do have 2 in fronts because they need them. I will be getting pour ins on the next cycle. However, I will give them time out of shoes as well. Just for a break. My farrier has been at me for years to do this. Finally I listened. No matter what type of shoes you have or don't, feeding is a big factor in hoof health. Plenty of info out there so I'll spare you the boredom. It does make a difference. People think it really doesn't but it really does. Thing is mine were already used to very minimal starch and creative grazing around the growing periods. So it wasn't a hard switch for them.

    Anyway, best of luck.

    Terri
    COTH, keeping popcorn growers in business for years.

    "I need your grace to remind me to find my own." Snow Patrol-Chasing Cars. This line reminds me why I have horses.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2007
    Posts
    9,173

    Default

    Well different things work for different horses. I prefer my horses in 4 shoes, even though both farriers have tried to make them barefoot on several occasions. Depends on the horse, his origin, heredity, feed, the soil, and mud and just about everything. Horses that come from mineral-rich soils do not do well in the south where it's either swamp or sand and no minerals in the soil. Plus the fertilizers used on the pastures down here can ruin hooves with the heavy morning dew causing reactions. (Got that from my farrier.)

    Glanzen did not work for my horse. Neither did Next Level. And they have to be used at least 3 or 4 months before any results can be seen, according to my friends who know nutrition. I used each for about 6 months. Next Level had worked, and was working well for the cute Arab at our barn. Didn't work for my horse.

    Neither did some of the topicals like keratex. One that did work was life data labs Hoof Disinfectant. Made his hooves hard. So you have to find the right combination for the horse by trial and error. I finally found it, thanks to my farrier who kept saying get the Crossapol. Now I just do maintenance with the Durasole. But since my horse came from where turnout was limited, he does not do well in dew, in mud, etc. As my farrier says, my horse should be kept inside in a stall with only 2 or 3 hours turnout a day, in the hottest and driest part of the day. Except my horse sunburns over 50% of his body, so that's not going to work. So to help with the wet grass and the sand and the mud, I have to use lots of products on him and in him. One thing though is that now I've somehow found the right combination so that with both of my horses, their hooves grow fast, and grow all year long at that rate. Either I'm doing something right or global warming is here. Now even the little Trak with good hooves that we got almost 2 yrs ago has rapid hoof growth.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2006
    Location
    east central Illinois and working north to the 'burbs
    Posts
    3,836

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cloudyandcallie View Post
    Plus the fertilizers used on the pastures down here can ruin hooves with the heavy morning dew causing reactions. (Got that from my farrier.)
    How does keeping them shod negate this?
    But since my horse came from where turnout was limited, he does not do well in dew, in mud, etc.
    If his feet are healthy and he is in overall proper health, that doesn't make sense to me. But that's OK because there are many things that don't make sense to me......
    As my farrier says, my horse should be kept inside in a stall with only 2 or 3 hours turnout a day, in the hottest and driest part of the day. Except my horse sunburns over 50% of his body, so that's not going to work.
    What if he wore a scrim sheet or turn-out rug?
    One thing though is that now I've somehow found the right combination so that with both of my horses, their hooves grow fast, and grow all year long at that rate.
    How much hoofwall gets removed at each trim? What is the interval between trims?
    Last edited by Rick Burten; Feb. 19, 2013 at 03:07 PM.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov. 17, 2008
    Posts
    609

    Default

    My ottb Geld has thin soles...what has been working well for him has been switching to steel shoes with pour in gel pads, and a leather pad over top of that! Also keeping him on a 4-6 week schedule so the toes don't get too long as well! He gets Grand Hoof Pellets, lives out except for bad weather. I also have used Durasole and Farriers Fix Hoof Oil too!



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Oct. 10, 2007
    Location
    down south
    Posts
    5,060

    Default

    Hey Rick question for you. I don't know what it is technically called but hopefully you'll know what I'm talking about. After the abscess is better would it be possibly good to put a full pad on that is cut and attached to the shoe. Shape the shoe then attach the pad cut to fit and then put a bondo type substance in-between the pad and hoof to build the concavity in the hoof? The substance I'm talking about is a gooey type mixture that when put in the hoof will mold to the hoof but it's a springy substance that has give but also puts some pressure I guess against the sole?
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2001
    Location
    California
    Posts
    318

    Default

    My horse has four white feet...and all of them are different. imho, diet makes a huge difference, along with turnout. You can get some excellent diet advice from Georgette of Zephyr's Garden. Here's an interesting thing that happened to me 3 shoeing cycles ago---my horse had to have clips behind to keep his hind shoes on, due to antics + short back = pulling them off himself. I felt that he needed a break from clips due to his hoof shape getting a little pulled in where the clips were, so my farrier put on fresh shoes without clips. My horse removed the first one within two weeks, then stepped on the other one, so I pulled it myself (omg---my already high respect for my shoer went through the roof after doing that; it's the RH that my horse hates having handled). Long story short----his feet expanded, he loved it, and we haven't had to put shoes back on behind. During the first couple of weeks I rasped smooth the areas that would chip/break off on their own, but otherwise left them alone. Now I do no rasping at all, and they are fine. The hoof wall is twice as thick as it was. My shoer was just out, rasped a little bit on one side of one hoof where he tends to be high on one side, and that was it. His frog and heels are expanding like crazy, and he has a swing to his walk behind that he never had before. As a benefit, the chiropractor has noted that he no longer seems to need lumbo-sacral adjustments, and his pelvis stays even. So...for what it's worth, that was my experience. I got Renegade boots for trail riding, as he wears them down on the pavement/rocks too quickly. I use Tuff Stuff on the nail holes in front, and on the bottom inch of all hooves. Durasole is great for the front soles. If he didn't have to wear wedges in front (old tendon issues) I would definitely try pulling the front shoes, with my farrier's blessing, and my vet's, but the wedges necessitate the shoes. Farrier is head shoer at UC Davis vet school, fyi.



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2007
    Posts
    9,173

    Default

    Rick, don't want to hijack this thread but:

    European WBs, except for the Traks, are known for having having bad hooves. It's heredity. And since they have bad hooves, they don't need to be grazing as that puts pressure on the fore hooves, and of course the mud and sand reek havoc with their hooves. If you look at the schedules of WBs in competition, they are exercised 2x a day and hand grazed for a while. Otherwise, they are stalled.

    Sun screens don't work in the deep South, coastal GA. My horse sweats in his Bucas sun shower in 65 degree weather. His fly spray has sun screen in it. But he has to go out at night from spring to fall. And he has to be in the dew at night.

    I never even thought about "dew poisoning" and fertilizers used in pastures till my farrier said he was taught that at a seminar years ago. He rode barrels with his QHs, and he won the state championship 2x with his mare, who was barefoot. But his horses were born down here, and not "foreigners" like mine.

    I just think the OP needs to try any supplement for at least 6 months before deciding whether to use it or not. And she needs to, as others have said, get her vet and farrier to work together as mine do. I don't have the answer for everyone, but I've found the answer for my horses. Both now have rapid hoof growth in both summer and winter. When I got my little Trak, she had great little hooves, but they grew slowly and her former farrier butchered them every 6 weeks. They were so short when my farrier did them the first time, he had to put smaller nails in her hooves and was worried that he'd quick her. He didn't.

    Oh yeah, my farrier comes every 6 weeks. Trim and reset and a diagnosis of whatever I need to do or not do. I did ask if there was anything I could do for my white hoofed Hessen besides get hoof transplants and farrier said that was the only thing that could cure CHS. Well, farrier says I need to get a QH, but that's not going to happen.

    And hmm I've never measured the amt of hoof wall that gets removed each time. I'll measure it on both in hmmm 4 weeks.



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2006
    Location
    east central Illinois and working north to the 'burbs
    Posts
    3,836

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rabicon View Post
    Hey Rick question for you. I don't know what it is technically called but hopefully you'll know what I'm talking about. After the abscess is better would it be possibly good to put a full pad on that is cut and attached to the shoe.
    Isn't that how its normally done Or, do yoou mean 'add a hospital plate" to the ground surface of the shoe? If so, the shoe and the plate are fabricated at the same time, holes drilled and tapped in the shoe and then the plate amended using short bolts. the area under the plate is filled with any one or several different fillers depending on the situation. If the pad is smended to the foot side of the shoe and the package then attached to the hoof, there is less room to add fillers and once added, they cannot be readily changed
    Shape the shoe then attach the pad cut to fit and then put a bondo type substance in-between the pad and hoof to build the concavity in the hoof?
    Bondo and the like(other PMMAs), is a hard substance when set and is not generally used under pads. There are several urethane products that have been developed for use under pads and in some instances in place of a pad. There is also a version of dental impression material that is used under pads. As well, there is always the old standby, silicone. And, many farriers who shoe long footed foot wavers still use live rubber under pads. For the most part, I still prefer something like Hawthorne's hoof packing and oakum or a 50/50 mixture of Venice Turpentine and Pine Tar brushed into the foot and covered with Oakum. There's another hoof packing out there that I'm experimenting with. Its called R.A.T.E. .
    It comes in two versions, original and Plus. I've used the original and find it quite acceptable. Now however, I'm using the Plus and like it even better. You are not supposed to have to use oakum with the Plus but my old habits die hard and I still add some oakum. I also use Magic Cushion and Magic Cushion Extreme when necessary and both of those need oakum too. For me, they are great products but not the 'do all, be all, end all' of hoof packing. As seems ever true, It Depends.
    The substance I'm talking about is a gooey type mixture that when put in the hoof will mold to the hoof but it's a springy substance that has give but also puts some pressure I guess against the sole?
    From the description, you are referring to either a urethane product or Impression Material both of which come in different hardness'.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2006
    Location
    east central Illinois and working north to the 'burbs
    Posts
    3,836

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Spartacus View Post
    Here's an interesting thing that happened to me 3 shoeing cycles ago---my horse had to have clips behind to keep his hind shoes on, due to antics + short back = pulling them off himself. I felt that he needed a break from clips due to his hoof shape getting a little pulled in where the clips were, .....
    What does having a short back have to do with pulling a hind shoe
    If the clips were properly located, that should not have happened.
    The hoof wall is twice as thick as it was.
    If the horse was at its genetic potential, that would be impossible. Out of curiosity, how long has it been since the thicker wall was first noticed?
    His frog and heels are expanding like crazy,.....
    So he had contracted heels and a 'mealy'/underdeveloped frog before? Was this just behind or were all four the same?



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
    Posts
    6,028

    Default

    OP, I have not read all the responses, but am responding to your original post.

    Sorry, I think you are overreacting a wee bit about the foot comment. They do sound crappy and maybe it was true. I know I have said stupid things before, I would cut him/her some slack. I'm sure your barn owner is aware of your horses hoof issues without hearing it anyway.

    I had a TB go from 4mm sole depth to 15 on rads over several months. This particular horse was shod with a wide-web aluminum and pour in pads for a couple months. Shoes were longer/larger than before (seemed to allow the new heel growth to come down instead of contracting under--I'm not a farrier--hard to explain). Initally in glue-on shoes because he didn't have enough wall to hold the nails. Trimmed every five weeks--this was key. Msm seemed to cause the most hoof growth, btw--which was an unintended, but welcome side-effect. I had really great feedback and help from the farriers on the COTH board. Taking radiographs and having the vet and (new) farrier work together were key. Learned a lot. More than I wanted to know...much easier to just have a great farrier and a horse with good feet.

    Horse lived outside all the time (i.e. before and after the feet issues) most days of the year.

    Third, I hope no one tells my warmblood she's supposed to have crappy feet. She's been barefoot her whole life (only coming 3) but seems to be doing well so far.
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2006
    Location
    east central Illinois and working north to the 'burbs
    Posts
    3,836

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cloudyandcallie View Post
    Rick, don't want to hijack this thread but:

    European WBs, except for the Traks, are known for having having bad hooves.
    They are? Not necessarily so in my custom.
    And since they have bad hooves, they don't need to be grazing as that puts pressure on the fore hooves, .......
    Does grazing not put pressure on the fore hooves of other breeds too? As youngsters, do these horses not get grazing time? Don't they eat hay off the ground? What does the pressure do to their hooves? Even when they are shod? Can you direct me to any writings/research that has been done on this phenomenon?
    If you look at the schedules of WBs in competition, they are exercised 2x a day and hand grazed for a while. Otherwise, they are stalled.
    Doesn't the fact that they are in competition add another factor to the equation? Is it possible that the "daddydiditthataway" mentality plays a [large] role in their management?
    Sun screens don't work in the deep South, coastal GA.
    Wasn't asking about sun screens, rather a scrim sheet or other lightweight sheet.....
    My horse sweats in his Bucas sun shower in 65 degree weather.
    Though I am loathe to admit it, I have no idea what a 'Bucas sun shower' might be.......
    His fly spray has sun screen in it.
    IMNTBCHO, water based fly sprays are as close to useless, once they dry, as can be found. Oil based fly sprays, while very effective, have some drawbacks too and from what you've said, would not be good for your horse.
    But he has to go out at night from spring to fall. And he has to be in the dew at night.
    Does the dew form at sundown or later in the evening? Regardless, If you keep a good water repellant hoof dressing on the horse, that should ameliorate much of the problem.
    I never even thought about "dew poisoning" and fertilizers used in pastures till my farrier said he was taught that at a seminar years ago.
    Regardless of what your farrier was taught, never before have I heard or read that dew poisoning/scratches/greasy heel/mud fever/whatever you choose to call it, is caused by fertilizers. The affliction, by any name, though it may be predisposed by wetness, is caused by "Dermatophilus congolensis, and often Staphylococcus spp. Dermatophytes (fungal organisms such as Malassezia or Trichophyton) can also contribute, as can chorioptic mange mites. Photosensitivity or irritant contact may contribute in certain cases. Rarely, vasculitis can cause continued inflammation."
    He rode barrels with his QHs, and he won the state championship 2x with his mare, who was barefoot. But his horses were born down here, and not "foreigners" like mine.
    So what?
    I just think the OP needs to try any supplement for at least 6 months before deciding whether to use it or not. And she needs to, as others have said, get her vet and farrier to work together as mine do.
    I agree.
    When I got my little Trak, she had great little hooves, but they grew slowly and her former farrier butchered them every 6 weeks.

    They were so short when my farrier did them the first time, he had to put smaller nails in her hooves and was worried that he'd quick her.
    It is axiomatic that one should always uses the smallest nail possible and as few of them as is pragmatic, to accomplish the job.
    Last edited by Rick Burten; Feb. 19, 2013 at 08:38 PM.



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Oct. 10, 2007
    Location
    down south
    Posts
    5,060

    Default

    Cloudy I find this interesting. I know many people with warmbloods here in the south and I've never found it common that their horses had bad feet and shouldn't be grazing. Actually I've never heard of this unless of course the horse is over weight and in on it's way to founder. Now i have heard tbs and know many that have horrible feet issues but most of them still get to graze. My paint is from up north so he is not use to the south either but he has no problem fitting in with the climate. I use sunscreen on his nose and my walkers nose in the summer. Twice a day does great but if it's 50% of his body have you used a uv protected fly sheet and fly mask? Then sunscreen the exposed spots that need it? Yes, top competing horses are in a lot, but not because of their feet issues lol. They are in for different reasons around here. Mainly though is the
    owners want them out separate or with only one buddy and only a couple hours because they are so scared the horse will get hurt when turned out. That's why they go out with polos or boots on also. Unless your horse is prone to founder
    or very over weight the statement that WBs should bot be grazing because it adds extra weight to the front feet makes no sense. Drafts can have crappy feet and are large but they can graze without dying. I'm just trying to figure that statement out. My guys sweat to in spring and summer. We usually hose them a couple times a day because they are out 24/7 unless weather is bad. Why, because there are studies and proof that it's better for a horse to be turned out then in a stall it's whole life. I just don't see how that's a life for a horse to never get to run and fart and play with their buddies. Imagine how miserable that really has to be to be in a stall all day and only hand walk to graze. Idk maybe I'll get flamed for that but that's just not me.
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole


    2 members found this post helpful.

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2010
    Posts
    2,538

    Default

    I agree that the more turnout the better. My guy has a stall with a large paddock attached, so he can move around as much as he pleases. Good for the hooves, digestion, circulation, and mental health.

    Oh, and my guy is a TB, and he most definitely does NOT have crappy feet--he's been barefoot his whole life (well, he *might* have been briefly shod as a 2-year for his short-lived track training) and his hooves are huge, rock-hard, and tough as nails.



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Jul. 1, 2010
    Posts
    548

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Juxtapoze View Post

    My current farrier is great and has taken a special and personal interest in keeping my horse sound. I dumped 3 others who couldn't quite get get things right and were taking off too much sole. .
    You have undoubtedly discovered your problem..... and are now addressing it. Good luck,
    When you see the knife come out.......ask why? and expect an answer.
    Charlie Piccione
    Natural Performance Hoof Care



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    12,958

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Juxtapoze View Post
    He is so quick to write my horse off since he only sees the times when my horse is unsound
    And who can blame the vet for that?

    This is one of the huge problems with not using a vet for routine care. You can not get mad at the vet for stating an opinion based on the facts that you have given him.



Similar Threads

  1. Shoe/Pad options for thin soled TB
    By wishnwell in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: Oct. 21, 2011, 05:03 PM
  2. equi pak for a thin soled horse
    By Oskar in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: Aug. 28, 2011, 09:15 PM
  3. Thin soled TBs
    By ake987 in forum Eventing
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: Oct. 1, 2010, 11:55 AM
  4. Took my Thin soled ASB barefoot...
    By StefffiC in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: Jan. 13, 2010, 11:35 PM
  5. Why would he suddenly become thin soled?
    By mtngirl in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: Nov. 30, 2009, 10:12 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness