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  1. #41
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    wanderlust, are you pregnant now and stuck on bedrest? How many weeks are you? I hope things are going well!! It's been 10 years since I last did that drill, but if you want someone to commiserate with you, I remember it like it was yesterday . And, BTW, my 26 weeker graduated from college last spring!


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  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by S1969 View Post
    Of course, that is obviously one reason there are many more cases of autism. But according to the Autism Society webpage it is the fastest-growing developmental disability: 1,148% growth rate; and 10 - 17 % annual growth.

    http://www.autism-society.org/about-...tatistics.html

    It's probably more than just the label; environmental toxins may be a contributing factor.

    Again, I'm not suggesting that we stop vaccinating just in case . I am just personally cautious about vaccines that are not necessary, or that are not necessary YET. I know my kids are not sexually active, and see no harm in putting a vaccine like this off for the moment.



    Again, as someone else stated, a potential cause of the "fastest growing DD" statistic is because it is being diagnosed more, and also in place of other developmental disabilities that used to be diagnosed. I work with kids that have autism, and there are a number I have had as clients that you would never in a million years realize they had Autism. Even I wonder how this children ended up with a diagnosis, and many times parents will tell us that they pushed very hard for a diagnosis so alternative services could become available to them. These are the kids that 5-10 years ago, were not receiving any sort of diagnosis, and now are considered to be on the Spectrum. Also, diagnosis of PDD-NOS and Asperger's are currently counted in these statistics, as they are currently considered "on the spectrum." This is going to change with the new version of the DSM, and they will no longer be lumped in with ASD, but will be separate categories of diagnosis. It will be interesting to see if this changes the numbers at all.


    To relate to this topic, I am in my 20's and had the HPV vaccine in the first rounds of it being available/recommended (sometime when I was in college). I had no reactions and no ill-effects from it.


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  3. #43
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    I had the HPV vaccine as well, even though I was on the "high" end of the age bracket. It was fully covered by my insurance. I was somewhat sore afterwards, but nothing unmanageable.
    Only two emotions belong in the saddle: One is a sense of humor. The other is patience.



  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by ClassAction View Post
    I'm not quite clear on the logic of waiting to get vaccinated. If you are going to get vaccinated, why not get it now? Just get it over with and be protected.
    a) I think we should all be prudent about what vaccines we get and why;
    b) I think we should be especially prudent about what vaccines we give to children who are still growing;
    c) I am not anxious to give a *new* vaccine to my children; if it doesn't increase their risk by waiting for it to be tested for safety in real life (v. in clinical trials), then no reason not to wait.

    Like I said, my pediatrician is recommending this vaccine to 9 year old girls. I see no need for that in most cases, and certainly not in my family.


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  5. #45
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    Your tween/teen is not going to suddenly "get" autism from a shot.

    I had them in high school. No issue. Last one gave me an odd headache that night, but nothing else.


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  6. #46
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    Maybe 9 is too young for some kids in some situations. I can see that. But having seen 9YOs give birth in the wholesome (cough) state of Iowa, I can understand why doctors are pushing it early rather than later. Parents (not you per se) are often clueless about their kids' sexual activity UNTIL there's a negative consequence.

    Because the vaccine can only help prevent, not fix after the fact, it makes sense to get the vaccine done before a chance of sexual exposure.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...


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  7. #47
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    Mar. 15, 2008
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    Texas
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    I got them going into and during my freshman year of college. My 13yo sister hasn't had them yet, as far as I know, but probably will in a few years. The only side effects I had was after the second shot - I threw up and passed out - but that could also have been due to my huge anxiety of shots and getting three at the same time. The last one hurt the worst for me, and I got dizzy enough that I had to stay seated for a minute or two, but that was it.



  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaintedWhisper View Post
    Again, as someone else stated, a potential cause of the "fastest growing DD" statistic is because it is being diagnosed more, and also in place of other developmental disabilities that used to be diagnosed. I work with kids that have autism, and there are a number I have had as clients that you would never in a million years realize they had Autism. Even I wonder how this children ended up with a diagnosis, and many times parents will tell us that they pushed very hard for a diagnosis so alternative services could become available to them. These are the kids that 5-10 years ago, were not receiving any sort of diagnosis, and now are considered to be on the Spectrum. Also, diagnosis of PDD-NOS and Asperger's are currently counted in these statistics, as they are currently considered "on the spectrum." This is going to change with the new version of the DSM, and they will no longer be lumped in with ASD, but will be separate categories of diagnosis. It will be interesting to see if this changes the numbers at all.
    I agree. I'm not so sure there is a higher actual occurence of Austism Spectrum Disorders now as there is more diagnosis. I'm 50 and when I think back to my childhood and all the kids who were just considered "weird", they would likely be diagnosed on the "spectrum" now. Even now, since I've worked in IT for many years, I know quite a few adults who I suspect have Asperger's or something similar...they are uniquely suited for this kind of highly detailed, intellectually demanding, job with little social interaction required. I work in business analysis and program management myself, so I "translate" for lots of developers/programmers/coders (whatever a given organizations calls them) some of whom have strange social skills, you have to communicate with them in a very black and white way and not be offended by some talk that that is totally unfiltered. But, you get brilliant, consistent, work so it's worth it.


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  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canaqua View Post
    wanderlust, are you pregnant now and stuck on bedrest? How many weeks are you? I hope things are going well!! It's been 10 years since I last did that drill, but if you want someone to commiserate with you, I remember it like it was yesterday . And, BTW, my 26 weeker graduated from college last spring!
    Yup, sure am! 30 weeks, trying to hang in there til 34 or 36. Fortunately after 4 days in the hospital at 25 weeks, I was released to modified bed rest at home, so I can move around a little, but not allowed to go to work or go out except for doctor appointments.

    So glad to hear your son did well, it is definitely reassuring!


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  10. #50
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    Older age of fathers has been linked to both autism and schizophrenia. Supplementation with folic acid (just before and during early pregnancy) has been associated with a LOWER risk.

    Fathers are older than they used to be and our diets are worse.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    8 members found this post helpful.

  11. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by alternate_universe View Post
    Your tween/teen is not going to suddenly "get" autism from a shot.
    I was only using the autism theory as a reason people should not presume there is *no risk* from a vaccine.

    My bigger concern about the HPV vaccine is the "fainting" that also looks very much like seizures to many people (not just your tween getting lightheaded, but falling to the floor and jerking violently). I have heard first hand reports of that happening, and it's on the Gardasil website:

    The side effects include pain, swelling, itching, bruising, and redness at the injection site, headache, fever, nausea, dizziness, vomiting, and fainting. Fainting can happen after getting GARDASIL. Sometimes people who faint can fall and hurt themselves. For this reason, your health care professional may ask you to sit or lie down for 15 minutes after you get GARDASIL. Some people who faint might shake or become stiff. This may require evaluation or treatment by your health care professional.

    That's my biggest concern with the vaccine -- why does that happen?? That is not "tween angst" about getting a shot.



  12. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by S1969 View Post
    I was only using the autism theory as a reason people should not presume there is *no risk* from a vaccine.

    My bigger concern about the HPV vaccine is the "fainting" that also looks very much like seizures to many people (not just your tween getting lightheaded, but falling to the floor and jerking violently). I have heard first hand reports of that happening, and it's on the Gardasil website:

    The side effects include pain, swelling, itching, bruising, and redness at the injection site, headache, fever, nausea, dizziness, vomiting, and fainting. Fainting can happen after getting GARDASIL. Sometimes people who faint can fall and hurt themselves. For this reason, your health care professional may ask you to sit or lie down for 15 minutes after you get GARDASIL. Some people who faint might shake or become stiff. This may require evaluation or treatment by your health care professional.

    That's my biggest concern with the vaccine -- why does that happen?? That is not "tween angst" about getting a shot.
    Almost every one of my girlfriends have had it - and I don't know a single one who has a bad reaction.

    Also a fear of needles isn't "tween angst"...just go to a blood drive and you'll see people dropping left and right before any of their blood is even gone. The last time I donated blood I saw 3 grown men turn green when they say the needle go into their arm and the blood come out. 2 of them fainted.

    And just my .02 but home schooling doesn't prevent early sexual activity - high confidence levels do. Most of my female friends were virgins until college, including me, and some still are simply because they didn't want to and had the confidence not to do it only because everyone else had.

    (Not saying anyone who has sex has no confidence, obviously. I just think a lot of girls who do early sometimes only do because they think everyone else is.)


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  13. #53
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    Oct. 29, 2007
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    To those worried about the HPV vaccine, have you asked your doctor about these concerns? A good GP/pediatrician should be able to calmly explain the risks and benefits of a vaccine he/she is recommending and you trust them with your other medical advice...

    FWIW, I got Gardasil at about 18 (6 years ago) and had no adverse effects. Just like a flu shot Gardasil only covers certain HPV strains, but it covers the majority of the cancer-causing types. Unfortunately I contracted another strain and had to go through the rigmarole of constant testing. *However* I did feel better that whatever strain I caught was unlikely to be cancer-causing. And as I just taught my freshman bio students, since HPV can be spread by skin to skin contact, condoms don't provide enough protection (genitals still touch).

    From the CDC Gardasil vaccine fact sheet:
    Why is HPV vaccine recommended at ages 11 or 12 years?
    For the HPV vaccine to work best, it is very important for preteens to get all 3 doses (shots) long before any sexual activity with another person begins. It is possible to be infected with HPV the very first time they have sexual contact with another person. Also, the vaccine produces higher antibody that fights infection when given at this age compared to older ages.
    (http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd-vac/hpv/vac-faqs.htm)
    "Things turn out best for the people who make the best of the way things turn out." ~John Wooden

    Phoenix Animal Rescue


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  14. #54
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    I think those symptoms are common with many vaccines and not unique to HPV vaccine. Don't underestimate the existence of real "needle phobias". I have an, adult, friend who is seriously freaked out by needles for any purpose, including fainting. It's real, she's not crazy and is really very rational about everything else in life.

    I'm a pretty committed stoic and this year's flu vaccine was really tough...my arm hurt for days, way up into the shoulder joint...bruising, swelling, pain. A coworker who doesn't do well with pain found herself light headed the next day. But, the pain subsided over a week and I'm glad I chose to get the vaccine, as the flu has been knocking otherwise healthy people for a loop this year. I don't consider that a vaccine reaction, as I could function and was fully recovered in reasonably short order.



  15. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by S1969 View Post
    a) I think we should all be prudent about what vaccines we get and why;
    b) I think we should be especially prudent about what vaccines we give to children who are still growing;
    c) I am not anxious to give a *new* vaccine to my children; if it doesn't increase their risk by waiting for it to be tested for safety in real life (v. in clinical trials), then no reason not to wait.

    Like I said, my pediatrician is recommending this vaccine to 9 year old girls. I see no need for that in most cases, and certainly not in my family.
    Pretty much everything S1969 said.

    Our required vaccinations here in Ontario are diphtheria, tetanus, polio, measles, mumps and rubella. All of which have been around for many years, we have seen the fallout, and I was vaccinated for all of the above when I was a child/teen. And I have had dd vaccinated in accordance with those requirements and timelines.

    When the HPV vaccine came out, I discussed this with dd when it was offered (1st time here in Ontario) in her Gr. 8 year, and I was one of the few who declined. Actually, I think I was one of the few who actually discussed it with their child - I took her to our GP and the 3 of us talked about HPV and it's high transmittal rates (including the manner in which it is transmitted), and the suggested benefits of the vaccine.

    I'm good friends with a thalidomide victim, which probably skews my decision, but I just didn't feel, at that point, it was a decision I could make for her as a then 11 year old, and without seeing the next generation results.

    Up north (and for free), we are tested annually with a PAP for cervical cancer and hpv. She goes to our GP every year (and has for the last 3 years), for a full physical and conversation with her GP. Our GP and the kid have agreed to talk about the vaccine every year. The vaccine, as we are told, is good to use to the age of 26, no? On this one, I'm going to rely on the herd, and I'm going to leave it in her hands, with the advice she receives from our GP.

    So, get out there and vaccinate your boys!



  16. #56
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    In 1992, my best girl friend (Carol Ardouin) died of metastatic cervical cancer at age 32. It is not a death I wish on anyone. It was not pleasant or pretty or kind, it left her almost new born without a mother, a husband lost his wife, a family lost a wonderful person. I lost a childhood best friend - a constant in my life. She lost the long and wonderful life she wiuld have had.

    No one should have to die the death she had.

    Last week, i was searching thriugh the WHO database on preventable infectious disease deaths around the world, as I was writing an article for my business. The numbers are staggering. We are so lucky to live in a nation that vaccinates. Just look up the deaths due to whooping cough or diptheria around the world (WHO has the most accurate numbers) - truly sickening how many people die each year from preventable diseases...

    I am thankful to live in a country where my kids, their friends and all their partners when they become sexually actice (- and they will become active) can get HPV vaccinations
    Luistano Stallion standing for 2013: Wolverine UVF
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  17. #57
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    So, those of us in the vaccinated "herd" should protect the healthy, but paranoid? I consider it my duty as a healthy person, with healthy children, to vaccinate...for the express purpose of providing herd immunity for those who CANNOT be vaccinated, or for whom vaccines won't be effective, because of allerigies and/or immune system deficiencies.

    I am a DES daughter myself. Not as dramatic as thalidomide, for sure. I have a t-shaped uterus, bizarre cervix and two pre-term births to show for it. Plus, an increased risk of breast, vaginal and cervical cancer. But, things like thalidomide and DES are not like vaccines, which are given a few times and made with killed viruses. I have the schedule of my mother's DES doses...it was a systemic, synthetic, hormone, every day, in increasing doses, throughout the whole pregnancy (though the first trimester is what matters). WHILE my mother was pregnant, and directly affecting the environment I was living in. A far cry from a vaccine given to someone not currently pregnant.


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  18. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rel6 View Post
    Also a fear of needles isn't "tween angst"...just go to a blood drive and you'll see people dropping left and right before any of their blood is even gone. The last time I donated blood I saw 3 grown men turn green when they say the needle go into their arm and the blood come out. 2 of them fainted.

    And just my .02 but home schooling doesn't prevent early sexual activity - high confidence levels do. Most of my female friends were virgins until college, including me, and some still are simply because they didn't want to and had the confidence not to do it only because everyone else had.

    (Not saying anyone who has sex has no confidence, obviously. I just think a lot of girls who do early sometimes only do because they think everyone else is.)
    The "tween angst" (that was mentioned earlier in the thread) was a suggestion that young girls would be hysterical and faint because they were getting a shot or having a needle phobia. I've seen people faint before, but it sounds like this is not the same as the "seizure-like" behaviors described -- shaking and stiffness. I understand that people have needle phobias, but for the manufacturer of the vaccine to specifically mention "people who faint might shake or become stiff. This may require evaluation or treatment by your health care professional" suggests it is something other than the standard needle phobia, or they wouldn't bother to mention it.

    As to your other point - I agree 100%. I don't home school my kids to "keep them away" from other kids. But, the fact that we are able to choose the people they spend time with does make a difference (in my opinion) in their self-confidence. They don't need to try to "fit in" or succumb to peer pressure on a daily basis. Do they still suffer from peer pressure - of course; they have friends. But we (both kids and parents) can control the peer group to be one in which they feel comfortable being themselves.

    Again, though, just to clarify - I am not against my girls getting the vaccine. I am just not in a hurry to do it, so long as I feel that their risk is far less than the risks of the vaccine (and I feel this way about any type of vaccine).



  19. #59
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    Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but don't the manufacturers of a drug have to report a side effect if ONE person shows it? So theoretically, if someone who had an unknown pre-existing seizure condition got this shot, fainted, and seized upon hitting the floor, that would have to be listed as a potential side effect?

    I'm 21 and had the HPV shots when I was a teenager and I haven't had any negative effects. Just talked about this vaccine in my molecular biology of cancer class, actually...


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  20. #60
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    So I'm going to stand on my soapbox one more time, since I contributed earlier:
    -Yes, your children are going to be sexually active younger than you think that they are.
    -No, you can't guarantee that even though they may take standard precautions, they will be *completely* safe.

    HPV = potential electrocution of your ya-ya. Just sayin'...
    From someone who's been there, done that.

    Continue on with your thread...
    Come to the darkside...we have cookies.


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