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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by trubandloki View Post
    And that might be because it is now being labelled more.

    In today's society it is considered better to label your child with something like autism. Back in the day people did not want titles.
    Of course, that is obviously one reason there are many more cases of autism. But according to the Autism Society webpage it is the fastest-growing developmental disability: 1,148% growth rate; and 10 - 17 % annual growth.

    http://www.autism-society.org/about-...tatistics.html

    It's probably more than just the label; environmental toxins may be a contributing factor.

    Again, I'm not suggesting that we stop vaccinating just in case . I am just personally cautious about vaccines that are not necessary, or that are not necessary YET. I know my kids are not sexually active, and see no harm in putting a vaccine like this off for the moment.



  2. #22
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    They've given this vaccine to lots of people, and it seems remarkably safe. The benefits far exceed any possible harm.

    Vaccine. 2011 Oct 26;29(46):8279-84. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2011.08.106. Epub 2011 Sep 9.

    Monitoring the safety of quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine: findings from the Vaccine Safety Datalink.

    Gee J, Naleway A, Shui I, Baggs J, Yin R, Li R, Kulldorff M, Lewis E, Fireman B, Daley MF, Klein NP, Weintraub ES.


    Source

    Division of Healthcare Quality and Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. jgee@cdc.gov


    Abstract


    BACKGROUND:

    In 7 large managed care organizations (MCOs), we performed a post-licensure safety assessment of quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4) among 9-26 year-old female vaccine recipients between August 2006 and October 2009.

    METHODS:

    Sequential analyses were conducted weekly to detect associations between HPV4 exposure and pre-specified outcomes. The pre-specified outcomes identified by ICD-9 codes using computerized data at the participating MCOs included: Guillan-Barré Syndrome (GBS), stroke, venous thromboembolism (VTE), appendicitis, seizures, syncope, allergic reactions, and anaphylaxis. For rare outcomes, historical background rates were used as the comparison group. For more common outcomes, a concurrent unexposed comparison group was utilized. A standardized review of medical records was conducted for all cases of GBS, VTE, and anaphylaxis.

    RESULTS:

    A total of 600,558 HPV4 doses were administered during the study period. We found no statistically significant increased risk for the outcomes studied. However, a non-statistically significant relative risk (RR) for VTE ICD-9 codes following HPV4 vaccination of 1.98 was detected among females age 9-17 years. Medical record review of all 8 vaccinated potential VTE cases in this age group revealed that 5 met the standard case definition for VTE. All 5 confirmed cases had known risk factors for VTE (oral contraceptive use, coagulation disorders, smoking, obesity or prolonged hospitalization).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    In a study of over 600,000 HPV4 vaccine doses administered, no statistically significant increased risk for any of the pre-specified adverse events after vaccination was detected. Further study of a possible association with VTE following HPV4 vaccination is warranted.

    Published by Elsevier Ltd.







    JAMA. 2009 Aug 19;302(7):750-7. doi: 10.1001/jama.2009.1201.

    Postlicensure safety surveillance for quadrivalent human papillomavirus recombinant vaccine.

    Slade BA, Leidel L, Vellozzi C, Woo EJ, Hua W, Sutherland A, Izurieta HS, Ball R, Miller N, Braun MM, Markowitz LE, Iskander J.


    Source

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, Mailstop D-26, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. bfs9@cdc.gov


    Abstract


    CONTEXT:

    In June 2006, the Food and Drug Administration licensed the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (types 6, 11, 16, and 18) recombinant vaccine (qHPV) in the United States for use in females aged 9 to 26 years; the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices then recommended qHPV for routine vaccination of girls aged 11 to 12 years.

    OBJECTIVE:

    To summarize reports to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) following receipt of qHPV.

    DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:

    Review and describe adverse events following immunization (AEFIs) reported to VAERS, a national, voluntary, passive surveillance system, from June 1, 2006, through December 31, 2008. Additional analyses were performed for some AEFIs in prelicensure trials, those of unusual severity, or those that had received public attention. Statistical data mining, including proportional reporting ratios (PRRs) and empirical Bayesian geometric mean methods, were used to detect disproportionality in reporting.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

    Numbers of reported AEFIs, reporting rates (reports per 100,000 doses of distributed vaccine or per person-years at risk), and comparisons with expected background rates.

    RESULTS:

    VAERS received 12 424 reports of AEFIs following qHPV distribution, a rate of 53.9 reports per 100,000 doses distributed. A total of 772 reports (6.2% of all reports) described serious AEFIs, including 32 reports of death. The reporting rates per 100,000 qHPV doses distributed were 8.2 for syncope; 7.5 for local site reactions; 6.8 for dizziness; 5.0 for nausea; 4.1 for headache; 3.1 for hypersensitivity reactions; 2.6 for urticaria; 0.2 for venous thromboembolic events, autoimmune disorders, and Guillain-Barré syndrome; 0.1 for anaphylaxis and death; 0.04 for transverse myelitis and pancreatitis; and 0.009 for motor neuron disease. Disproportional reporting of syncope and venous thromboembolic events was noted with data mining methods.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Most of the AEFI rates were not greater than the background rates compared with other vaccines, but there was disproportional reporting of syncope and venous thromboembolic events. The significance of these findings must be tempered with the limitations (possible underreporting) of a passive reporting system.





    J Intern Med. 2012 Feb;271(2):193-203. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2796.2011.02467.x. Epub 2011 Nov 15.

    Surveillance of autoimmune conditions following routine use of quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine.

    Chao C, Klein NP, Velicer CM, Sy LS, Slezak JM, Takhar H, Ackerson B, Cheetham TC, Hansen J, Deosaransingh K, Emery M, Liaw KL, Jacobsen SJ.


    Source

    Department of Research and Evaluation, Kaiser Permanente Southern California, Pasadena, CA 91101, USA. chun.r.chao@kp.org


    Abstract


    OBJECTIVE:

    An observational safety study of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4) in women was conducted. This report presents findings from autoimmune surveillance. Design.  Subjects were followed for 180days after each HPV4 dose for new diagnoses of 16 prespecified autoimmune conditions.

    SETTING:

    Two managed care organizations in California. Subjects.  Number of 189,629 women who received ≥1 dose of HPV4 between 08/2006 and 03/2008.

    OUTCOME:

    Potential new-onset autoimmune condition cases amongst HPV4 recipients were identified by electronic medical records. Medical records of those with ≥12-month health plan membership prior to vaccination were reviewed by clinicians to confirm the diagnosis and determine the date of disease onset. The incidence of each autoimmune condition was estimated for unvaccinated women at one study site using multiple imputations and compared with that observed in vaccinated women. Incidence rate ratios (IRR) were calculated. Findings were reviewed by an independent Safety Review Committee (SRC).

    RESULTS:

    Overall, 1014 potential new-onset cases were electronically identified; 719 were eligible for case review; 31-40% were confirmed as new onset. Of these, no cluster of disease onset in relation to vaccination timing, dose sequence or age was found for any autoimmune condition. None of the estimated IRR was significantly elevated except Hashimoto's disease [IRR=1.29, 95% confidence interval: 1.08-1.56]. Further investigation of temporal relationship and biological plausibility revealed no consistent evidence for a safety signal for autoimmune thyroid conditions. The SRC and the investigators identified no autoimmune safety concerns in this study.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    No autoimmune safety signal was found in women vaccinated with HPV4.

    © 2011 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.






    J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2012 Apr;21(4):425-32. doi: 10.1089/jwh.2011.2895. Epub 2012 Jan 9.

    Reported adverse events in young women following quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination.

    Naleway AL, Gold R, Drew L, Riedlinger K, Henninger ML, Gee J.


    Source

    The Center for Health Research, Kaiser Permanente Northwest, Portland, OR 97227, USA. allison.naleway@kpchr.org


    Abstract


    PURPOSE:

    To assess and describe young women's experiences with their first dose of quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4) (Gardasil®) in a large managed care organization.

    METHODS:

    We collected survey and electronic medical record (EMR) data for 899 young women aged 11-26 receiving their first HPV4 injection from February through September 2008. Survey items included questions about adverse events, interactions with healthcare providers, and knowledge and attitudes toward HPV disease and HPV4.

    RESULTS:

    Six hundred ninety-six (78%) participants reported pain at the injection site. Other common reactions included injection site bruising or discoloration (n=155, 17%) or swelling (n=127, 14%) and presyncope or syncope (n=134, 15%). Overall, preteens and teens were more likely than adult participants to report vaccine adverse events. Most respondents, particularly in the adult age group, reported that their healthcare provider reviewed important information about HPV infection and about the risks and benefits of receiving the vaccine. Knowledge and attitudes about HPV and HPV4 also varied by age, with older women generally exhibiting more accurate knowledge about HPV and perceived susceptibility to cervical cancer.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    There were significant age differences in young women's experiences with their first HPV4 injection. These findings highlight the importance of age-appropriate education and provider communications about HPV disease and vaccination.


    PMID: 22229713 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


    5 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
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    I appreciate this thread. I have three boys and this is helping me think about it.



  4. #24
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    I've had it, no problems.
    Impossible is nothing.



  5. #25
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    Absolutely! I was in my 20's and had just a year left of insurance coverage for it (based on age) and went out of my way to make sure I got it. Anything that has a chance of preventing cancer (and has a very good safety record) is worth it to me. I wouldn't hesitate to vaccinate kids when/if the time comes.



  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by S1969 View Post
    Again, I'm not suggesting that we stop vaccinating just in case . I am just personally cautious about vaccines that are not necessary, or that are not necessary YET. I know my kids are not sexually active, and see no harm in putting a vaccine like this off for the moment.
    And by the time you know they are sexually active it may be too late. My understanding is the vaccine is only effective prior to exposure to HPV. Therefore the age recommendations are an age that should be BEFORE any sexual activity including heavy petting. (Trying to keep this somewhat PG)
    Oh, well, clearly you're not thoroughly indoctrinated to COTH yet, because finger pointing and drawing conclusions are the cornerstones of this great online community. (Tidy Rabbit)


    7 members found this post helpful.

  7. #27
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    I've had 2 of the shots. I'm overdue for my 3rd one but I go into mass hysteria/panic/anxiety attacks whenever I get shots. Just reading this thread is giving me anxiety I didn't have any adverse reactions other than being a bit stiff after I got the 1st one, but I think that's because I also got my tetanus at that time too.
    Proud member of the COTH Junior (and Junior-at-Heart!) clique!



  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by SonnysMom View Post
    And by the time you know they are sexually active it may be too late. My understanding is the vaccine is only effective prior to exposure to HPV. Therefore the age recommendations are an age that should be BEFORE any sexual activity including heavy petting. (Trying to keep this somewhat PG)
    Yes, thank you - I know how it works - it wasn't my plan to wait UNTIL they were sexually active. Certainly my 11 year old is no where near being "in danger" of HPV exposure for some time, so I am not in a hurry for her, despite the fact that other kids do have sex at her age. Our pediatrician has been pushing it since she turned 9. I am not worried that we will miss the window of opportunity by not vaccinating a 9 year old girl.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by S1969 View Post
    Certainly my 11 year old is no where near being "in danger" of HPV exposure for some time, so I am not in a hurry for her, despite the fact that other kids do have sex at her age.
    Your idea of some time might not match that of your daughters.


    20 members found this post helpful.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by mercedespony View Post
    Interesting - I chose not to have our daughter vaccinated.
    I'm pretty messed up fertility wise, and have had many miscarriages. I'd feel better knowing the results/effects on the second generation post vaccination.
    This is why my mom and I ultimately decided that it wasn't worth the risk. Additionally, several of my friends started the series and had such severe reactions (very, very sick) that they didn't even go back for the third shot.



  11. #31
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    But don't you know, according to Michele Bauchmann, she spoke to a woman whose child received the HPV vaccine and the child suffered from mental retardation thereafter.

    Sorry, I just couldn't resist.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    4 members found this post helpful.

  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by mercedespony View Post
    Interesting - I chose not to have our daughter vaccinated.
    I'm pretty messed up fertility wise, and have had many miscarriages. I'd feel better knowing the results/effects on the second generation post vaccination.
    I've had all 3 vaccinations and zero trouble conceiving.



  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by trubandloki View Post
    Your idea of some time might not match that of your daughters.
    Sigh. Believe it or not, I am quite positive that my 11 year old is in no danger; one of many, many reasons we homeschool is so that pre-teen girls do not feel pressured to have sex at age 11. Because quite honestly, I doubt most of those sexually active pre-teens really are interested in the sex - especially the girls. But feel free to think what you want; my kids and I have a pretty good relationship so I feel confident I am not putting them in danger by not having them vaccinated yet.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #34
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    No way. No how.



  15. #35
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    I have two boys. One has had the vaccine. He was already 16 when it was approved by the FDA and it was initially offered only to girls. Shortly before he left for college, his pediatrician discussed it with him and they decided (he was 18 at the time, so I was not part of the discussion) that he should have it.

    Younger boy is only 10 and nowhere near being sexually active (we're all late bloomers here!). He pediatrician has not raised the issue yet, I'm sure she will in time. If not, I'll bring it up, as I do want him to have it.

    Oral cancer is terrifying. DH had a small squamous cell tumor on his lip 8 years ago, it was tiny and successfully treated with Moh's surgery and has never returned. His was likely related to sun exposure and smoking, but, while doing research on oral cancers, I came across a lot of stories of YOUNG men and women, who had never smoked, being diagnosed with disfiguring, disabling, and often deadly, oral cancers...all related to high risk HPV strains. If there is a way to avoid that, I'm all for it.


    8 members found this post helpful.

  16. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by mercedespony View Post
    Interesting - I chose not to have our daughter vaccinated.
    I'm pretty messed up fertility wise, and have had many miscarriages. I'd feel better knowing the results/effects on the second generation post vaccination.
    It's a vaccine for a virus. Like the flu, chicken pox, or hepatitis. How concerned are you about those causing fertility issues?

    Having had multiple recurrences of pre-cancerous cells and associated painful tests and treatment, I'd kill to have been able to get the vaccine as a kid. I was too old for the vaccine by the time it came out, but paid out of pocket anyways to protect myself from the strains I hadn't been exposed to.

    Had absolutely zero problem conceiving post-vaccine, but have had serious problems maintaining this pregnancy, courtesy of the treatments for the pre-cancerous condition. Pre-term labor (2x starting at 25 weeks) and 14 weeks of bedrest are awesome. Just something to noodle on.


    8 members found this post helpful.

  17. #37
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    I agree with wanderlust...concerns of fertility and childbearing should drive one to get the vaccine, not avoid it.

    I somehow managed not to acquire any high risk HPV strains and haven't had any persistent abnormal paps that required treatment, but I do have an incompetent cervix (born that way). It is NO fun. First son was born at 26 weeks, after having a cerclage and a month of bedrest. Second son made it to 37 weeks...again cerclage and FOUR months of bedrest. And, I'm one of the very lucky ones, two healthy boys. Surgeries for HPV and cervical cancer can most certainly produce an incompetent cervix. Preterm birth, very expensive medical care, lost wages while lying in bed...nothing anyone wants to go through.


    8 members found this post helpful.

  18. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canaqua View Post
    concerns of fertility and childbearing should drive one to get the vaccine, not avoid it.
    Any cancer in the pelvic region that receives radiation treatment WILL, without any doubt, leave your child sterile. Period. End of genetic story.
    I'm not arguing, I'm just explaining why I'm right
    Violence doesn't end violence. It extends it. Break the cycle.


    17 members found this post helpful.

  19. #39
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    I'm not quite clear on the logic of waiting to get vaccinated. If you are going to get vaccinated, why not get it now? Just get it over with and be protected.
    Forward momentum!


    7 members found this post helpful.

  20. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canaqua View Post
    I agree with wanderlust...concerns of fertility and childbearing should drive one to get the vaccine, not avoid it. <snip>

    I somehow managed not to acquire any high risk HPV strains and haven't had any persistent abnormal paps that required treatment, but I do have an incompetent cervix (born that way). It is NO fun. First son was born at 26 weeks, after having a cerclage and a month of bedrest. Second son made it to 37 weeks...again cerclage and FOUR months of bedrest. And, I'm one of the very lucky ones, two healthy boys. Surgeries for HPV and cervical cancer can most certainly produce an incompetent cervix. Preterm birth, very expensive medical care, lost wages while lying in bed...nothing anyone wants to go through.
    Amen. Fortunately, I have a job (and an awesome boss) that have allowed me to work from home. Otherwise I'd be looking at 50%-60% of my salary in disability payments, and probably a complete mental meltdown. Not to mention the stress of wondering if your 25-week preemie will live, and if so, what major long-term health issues it will have and what kind of impact that will have on both of your lives.

    Scary, life-altering stuff... both the fear for my own health, and now, that of my child.


    2 members found this post helpful.

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