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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2008
    Location
    Greeley, Colorado
    Posts
    3,828

    Default

    The one time it happened to me I was able to slip a lead around the back fetlock and flip her over. Luckily she was super well behaved and calm. As soon as I got into the stall she stopped thrashing. It also helped that she was only around 14h and 1000 lbs. I couldn't imagine having to do that with a panicked 17h wb.
    **Friend of bar.ka**

    Fils Du Reverdy (Revy)- 1993 Selle Francais Gelding
    My equine soulmate



  2. #22
    Join Date
    May. 18, 2006
    Posts
    150

    Default un-casting a horse by yourself

    Well just yesterday my 15 hand yearling got cast right up tight against the wall, all 4 legs. There was only me and a tiny little l2 year old girl around. I always have 2 long soft lounge ropes around this purpose. We both grabbed the end of the rope (looped around one back leg and one front leg) and tried to pull her over. We tried many times but couldn't get her flipped over. We finally switched places, me in the back and the little girl in the front and managed to slowly flip her over, but barely! I didn't think it was going to happen because we tried so many times. I don't know how anyone can actually PULL a horse out,. either by the halter, tail, or whatever, from the wall by themselves.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2008
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,354

    Default

    Unless the horse is thrashing/kicking, putting the rope on the hind leg always works better but the bigger the horse, the bigger that end is so its a bit of a catch 22.

    Also, once they have their legs at the bottom of the wall, you will have to get them back over most of the way before they will be able to help you.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2012
    Posts
    202

    Default

    A bit of an extreme scenario but I took a saws all to a stall wall to get a cast mare up, couldn't shift her even with two people and she was having difficulty breathing (head and neck were twisted). Luckily we were in the midst of renovating and she was good with powertools.
    Funniest one was a very round mare with no withers rolled in the middle of a field and sank straight down in a snow drift of wet heavey snow, perfectly on her back. Had to dig her out on one side so she would tip over and get up, couldn't pull her over by myself cause she was a good 2000lbs and that snow just packed up beside her as you pulled.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Nov. 5, 2002
    Location
    way out west
    Posts
    3,151

    Default

    One of my geldings was cast in his stall and I hauled first one, then another bale of hay in and forced it between his hind feet and the wall. He was able to push off against the hay with his back feet and scoot himself more to the middle and his front feet out the sliding door to his run, where he just lay there and caught his breath for a few minutes, then got up.

    It scared me to death, to be honest, because I was alone and there wasn't anyone to help. My horse had cut himself on his face with all the thrashing, and there was blood everywhere. All superficial, though. And of course it was both a holiday and the crack of dawn...4:30 a.m.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2011
    Posts
    1,188

    Default

    I've had success several times over the years with carefully looping a long cotton lead over the head and neck down to the base of the neck, and then pulling the horse away from the wall at an angle. Just a few feet and they can usually get right up. It has to be at the base of the neck not near the head, and it wasn't hard at all. An oldtimer taught me that one. I've also done the rope over the fetlock and flip toward you, but that usually results in legs flying.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2013
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    500

    Default

    I use a lead rope or lunge line around the offside leg and pull...had to do it a few times with a 2 yr old that was kept at a boarding farm where i fed sometimes. Not fun, but i was never hurt and neither was baby.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2011
    Location
    Co
    Posts
    4,389

    Default

    I was able to right my mare (she was not in a panic) by taking a firm hold of her mane close to the withers and tugging, moving her front end inch by inch until her front end was far enough away from the wall.
    Once she had the fore end free she was able to push against the wall with her hindquarters and get up.

    Of course, I was younger and stronger back then.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Nov. 10, 2005
    Location
    Va
    Posts
    3,601

    Default

    I used to do barn work for my trainer two afternoons a week. She had one very fancy mare who got herself cast so many times trainer got her one of those surcingles with the "bars" on it (anti-cast). I was there quite a few times by myself when she got cast. The mare was 16.3h. At the time I was in the 150lb range and about 5'5". Several times I was unable to actually flip her, but I was able to get her pulled away from the wall enough so she could push her self away further and then get up. Luckily, she was very sane.



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun. 13, 2009
    Posts
    243

    Default

    im guessing most people probably dont have a spare pair of hobbles (for standardbreds) hanging in there barn haha but they are great for a cast horse. i have used them different times, iworked at the track and often the only one around late at night or feeding in the morning. a hobble around the fronts a hobble around the back legs and i could get any horse flipped over, and then theres nothing tied to there legs once they are over they just slip off



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2002
    Location
    the far side
    Posts
    2,281

    Default

    This picture shows a larksfoot assist. If you imagine taking the end of the rope with the loop in it and just pulling it forward so that the two are running parallel to each other between the front legs, you have a forward assist. The larksfoot and the forward assist can be used to pull a recumbent horse forward. If you do the mirror image of the forward assist - rope goes through the hind legs, up over the croup, and back through the hind legs - you have a rear assist that can be used to pull the horse backward. I don't suggest doing any of these with a braided cotton rope, since it will stretch. The trick to getting the rope under the horse is to go right behind the elbows or right in front of the stifles and stick something under there from the back (where you should be standing) to hook a rope that you throw across them. There has been at least one entire book written on technical large animal rescue, and it's not always safe to do something like this on an unsedated horse, but I thought I'd mention these for the occasional horse who is stuck in the corner with their legs all folded up or has wedged themselves under something. Faster and cheaper than fixing the results of a Sawzall, if you can avoid it.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jan. 18, 2008
    Location
    Alberta, Canada and South Australia
    Posts
    2,996

    Default

    I live 40 feet from the stable so I hear everything. I can know tell if a horse is cast or just being annoying and kicking.

    Most of the time I can just yell at them or give them a poke as encouragement. Those are my fave types of being cast.

    But when they are cast against the door and really can't get up, which means I have to scale the walls. So not fun specially at 2am.

    When I do have to go in and flip them over, I do now phone a co-worker ( lives of property) and say " I have so and so cast, I'm going in. Don't think I will need help but if I scream or you don't hear from me, come and check!"

    So glad the stables are empty now....will now sleep easy now!

    P.



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Middleburg, VA
    Posts
    13,014

    Default

    I have been able to unstick them with a couple or ropes (especially if I am alone, I find two ropes, one for each end, easier). If I can't actually flip them, I can usually rock them enough to get them to move further away from the wall and give them an extra couple of inches to finish the job. I have a mare in my barn who cast herself more than most horses I know (at least three times in about 6 months, which is far more than any horse, even my weanling a few years ago, I know!). I had to unstick her alone at least once, and I was always able to...helped that she was cooperative.

    I try very hard not to get closer than necessary. I DID have to sit on a neck once when a horse kicked a foot through his stall bars. I sat on him while the other people got him unstuck, then we rolled him. That was loads of fun...



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,782

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Polydor View Post
    But when they are cast against the door and really can't get up, which means I have to scale the walls.
    That's why I love having exterior doors as well

    Does this mean your doors open in?
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Apr. 6, 2006
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,779

    Default

    My doofus of a mare once cast herself under the fence in her field - which of course has plenty of non-dangerous places to roll!

    The fence is the Centaur type so they had to unspool part of it to get her out.

    Unfortunately she is a drama queen and of course panicked. My friend (who luckily was RIGHT there when it happened) had to sit on her head to keep her from breaking her neck until she could be sedated and untangled.

    Thank god for the fence though! If it had been wood her legs would have been shredded. The mare seriously has NO sense of self-preservation whatsoever.

    In addition, last year my 32 year old gelding got cast in the middle of the night inside his shed. When they found him in the morning he was colicking badly and had to be put down. The vet thinks he was already colicking and rolled in the shed - then got stuck. (Dont' worry he had a long awesome life!) But I still feel bad that he ended up in that situation.

    I guess you can't watch them 24/7 - and even if you did they would still find a creative way to kill themselves!



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    5,268

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    Yep - done it solo many times - actually rather do it solo, then have an extra person in a danger area. Like the others - I use a long cotton rope.



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2009
    Posts
    1,210

    Default

    We had a horse that got cast several times. Luckily he was a little guy,
    maybe 15 hands. He was a stallion, but what a mellow little guy !

    The first time he somehow got a leg stuck in the hind leg strap of his
    blanket, too close to the wall. He could have easily broken it but he just l
    aid there and waited until I got there to feed in the morning. I unbuckled
    the straps and he was able to push himself far enough away from the wall
    to get up.

    Then a few other times he just got too close to the wall. He was small enough
    that I was able to wrap a fat cotton lead around the bottom hind leg and
    helped to flip him to his other side so he could get up.

    We figured out that he looooooooooved new shavings in his stall so much
    that he went nuts rolling in them. So we tried to just put a little in each
    day and mixed it in with the not so fresh beding, and he was less interested
    in rolling in it.



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2008
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    2,190

    Default

    The few times I encountered it and I was alone, I got a lead rope , put it around the neck, down by the chest and was able to pull him out just enough that he could get himself pushed clear. Another time his legs were up high on the wall and using lead ropes around the legs( all 4 legs at once,front & back ) I was able to pull him over and with the rope you are not in so much danger from kicks.



  19. #39
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2003
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    6,254

    Default

    I've had it happen when by myself and have never tried to flip them--too afraid to be caught by a hoof. All I've done is to grab the horse by the tail, pull it and slide the horse out from the wall (they will slide pretty easily on shavings.) Once they are out a bit from the wall they can get up on their own.
    "Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain" ~Friedrich Schiller



  20. #40
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2008
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,354

    Default

    Ok, I think I need to go back to the gym because when our guy (officially weighed at clinic at 1600 lbs) got cast, ie legs folded up at the bottom of the wall, there was no way DD at 125 lbs and me at 135 lbs could budge him! He was wonderfully calm, but maybe that was part of the problem, he was dead weight just laying there waiting for us to flip him over - no help whatsoever!

    So I guess I either need to bulk up or get smaller horses.....



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