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  1. #1

    Default horse cast in stall and you're the only one there

    What to do? Luckily this hasn't happened to me yet; I've always had another person around to help me flip the horse over and get uncast. I could never flip over a horse by myself. What if they're stuck against the wall and can't get up.



  2. #2
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    Unfortunately I have had this happen numerous times with two of my horses. With the one horse he was up against the back wall with feet up in the air. I managed to grab the hind legs teeter him back and forth and using all the strength I could muster managed to roll him over. I had to run out of the stall to get away but still got struck by his legs. Fortunately I was not hurt.

    Another time I was able to pull the horse by the tail to get him away from the wall just enough for him to push himself off the wall.

    A third time he was cast against the stall door. I opened the door and his hind legs came out into the isle and he was able to scramble up.

    Fortunately both horses got a little smarter with age.

    Not something I enjoyed, though terrified at the time I always seemed to find the strength required. I guess my adrenaline went into overdrive.

    Meant to add, another time I used a lunge line around the base of the neck to pull the horse away from the wall.



  3. #3
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    Jul. 22, 2007
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    I have no idea, I think it would really depend how the horse was cast...I do always think of a scene in one of the "Thoroughbred" books when the main character uses a longe line and the column in the barn (for leverage) to pull the horse over.

    Also, I would think how panicky the horse was would play a big part...
    "On the back of a horse I felt whole, complete, connected to that vital place in the center of me...and the chaos within me found balance."



  4. #4
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    You can usually use a cotton lead rope either on the halter and pull that way or on a leg and pull that way depending upon how the horse is cast. When you start pulling the horse starts pushing and the he does the majority of the work. I have gotten countless horses up by myself that way. I had one horse who got himself cast more times than I can remember in the paddock with nothing but a water trough in it. His front legs would be on one side of the trough and back legs on the other with his belly up against the trough. You would think he would eventually learn to roll somewhere else!


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  5. #5
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    I would always use a rope, no matter how many people were there, as that will allow you to stay (mostly) out of range of flailing feet if/when the horse decides to try to help

    If the horse is just frantic, it doesn't matter how many people are there, and you still have to wait until he's calm enough to get close

    Getting a rope of some sort around the legs is key for single people, usually. I'd try to get the hind legs, since if you can get that end moving, the rest will come along with it. Front legs would be my second choice.
    ______________________________
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  6. #6
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    In my younger days I got right in there with a cast horse once and grabbed its legs and pulled it over . . . where it easily could have crushed me. Stupid! Bless the beast for being a saint and just slowly climbing to his feet.

    Now I would probably get my big, soft cotton longe line and try to figure out a way to snag a leg and move the beast just enough to give it a chance, but there's no way on earth I'm getting in harm's way unless it's a foal or something. People > horses.
    Click here before you buy.


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  7. #7
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    When snagging a leg with a rope, it helps if it's the offside leg when at all possible. If you grab the near side, you could cause some damage if you're having to pull hard enough to get the body weight to shift enough.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET


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  8. #8
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    Feb. 6, 2000
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    50 feet of cotton rope kept hanging inside the tackroom door.
    Length is probably overkill, but better too long than too short.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.


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  9. #9
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    Jun. 30, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laurierace View Post
    You can usually use a cotton lead rope either on the halter and pull that way or on a leg and pull that way depending upon how the horse is cast. When you start pulling the horse starts pushing and the he does the majority of the work. I have gotten countless horses up by myself that way. I had one horse who got himself cast more times than I can remember in the paddock with nothing but a water trough in it. His front legs would be on one side of the trough and back legs on the other with his belly up against the trough. You would think he would eventually learn to roll somewhere else!
    Ditto. It's usually surprisingly easy to get them up by yourself. All they usually need is a tug in the right direction so they can get a little more clearance.

    It seems like no one is ever around when I find a horse cast!

    Depending on how the horse is cast, you may need to use their tail or tie a rope in the tail.
    Don't fall for a girl who fell for a horse just to be number two in her world... ~EFO



  10. #10
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    DD's 17.3 1600 lb. horse got cast last year - head under the water buckets and legs down at the base of the wall. Thankfully, he just layed there while we got the buckets out but DD and I could not get him rolled over - he was like dead weight.

    Finally had to get DH out of the bed to come help. We opened the dutch doors at the back of the stall and the screen door to he aisle and used long leads on the bottom legs. As soon as the horse was rolled, we each made a hasty exit so the horse would have room to get up.

    If it had just been me, there would have been no way in hell I could have gotten him up but I sure wouldn't have wanted more than one person helping because we couldn' have gotten out of his way without someone getting hurt.



  11. #11
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    Default This is' how you do it' ~ if you can not the fire dept can be a resource too ~

    This is "how you do it" but if you can not your local Fire Dept. can be a resource ~ they are only a call away and then you don't have to leave the horse to find a neighbor to help you.

    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    I would always use a rope, no matter how many people were there, as that will allow you to stay (mostly) out of range of flailing feet if/when the horse decides to try to help

    If the horse is just frantic, it doesn't matter how many people are there, and you still have to wait until he's calm enough to get close

    Getting a rope of some sort around the legs is key for single people, usually. I'd try to get the hind legs, since if you can get that end moving, the rest will come along with it. Front legs would be my second choice.
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"


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  12. #12
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    In our stable management 101 classes, cast horses and how to help them was part of the first lesson.

    "It depends" on the presentation what you can do safely.
    Taking that into consideration, most times, wrapping a long cotton rope around the right leg for the situation and pulling the horse gently over does the trick.

    We had one yearling colt that kept getting cast in his very large run, all four legs thru the pipe bars and would wait there without scrambling for us to help him.
    We were glad when he learned to use the middle of the pen to roll around.

    The scariest I had was an older gelding cast by rolling with his belly into a column and then, not having anywhere to push with his legs on both sides of it and the column keeping him from rolling on it's belly, he could not get up.

    That one was hard to scoot around until he could help flip him over with one front hoof on the column to push against.
    I had some pictures somewhere, but can't find them.



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ghazzu View Post
    50 feet of cotton rope kept hanging inside the tackroom door.
    Length is probably overkill, but better too long than too short.
    Me, too.



  14. #14
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    I was taught to loop a long lead rope to each of the far legs and pull in tandem. It must be done when the horse is calm enough to allow you to do this. I keep two very fat round lunge lines in the tack room at the ready. The length of the lunge line allows you to be far enough away from the horses legs as he comes around. Thankfully mine have always "known" that I was there to help them and didn't struggle.
    "I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you..."



  15. #15
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    At 5'3 and 110lbs, I've rarely had luck flipping a cast horse over without some form of leverage. Pulling up (i.e. using a ceiling beam) sometimes isn't as helpful to help flip them, find a pipe or support that is across and use that.

    If the horse is chill, I'd attempt it with a cotton lunge line (with gloves!). If the horse is really panicking, my choice would be to kneel on head/neck and make a phone call to BO/BM/strong friend/fire or police department/vet/etc... Usually you can get them to chill with scritches (been here... multiple times) and some relaxing chatter. If you keep their head and neck down they usually won't flail.

    Take a deep breathe and really asses the situation before just jumping right in. Keeping a cool head is your #1 best strategy.
    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
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  16. #16
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    Omg the baby*cast himself every other day when he was little. I wrapped a lead or whatever I had handy around the off leg and rolled him back over. Some times were harder than others, depending where he was and how he was stuck. Plus he kept growing, which didn't help. For whatever reason he'd roll over right in to the fence, tree, whatever. Thank goodness he never panicked. A couple days ago he rolled again and I thought for sure he was going to roll into the fence, but actually stopped and didn't roll all the way over... maybe he's finally figured it out. LOL



  17. #17
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    Pony rolled downhill and got his legs on both sides of a tree. He's a smart boy and DH says he grabbed pony's blanket and used the slope and that the pony pushed when told to push until he came around far enough to roll back over. Without the blanket though . . . and I have no idea what we'd do for the old guy, he'd panic for sure.

    Good tips. What about covering the head if your guy is panicking? Or are you just going to have to wait it out for sedation?
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
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  18. #18
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    I asked this same question here a few years back. Best answer that I remember from CBoylen - poke them with a broom! Often they will manage to get up themselves. I have a horse that was getting cast regularly while on stall rest, and got to use this method once. We put anticast strips up in the stall and either tat worked or he got smarter as he hasn't done it again, at least, not that I know of.

    ETA found my thread from before: http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/sh...Horse-Up-Alone
    Last edited by horsepoor; Feb. 18, 2013 at 12:39 PM. Reason: Adding link



  19. #19
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    - I have a friend who got kicked in the face trying to raise a horse by herself - lost several teeth, broken jaw and scarred.

    - If the horse has stopped fighting, and has had a breath, just coming into the stall and flailing your arms might encourage him to make one more mighty attemp. It did with mine and she is 17 hh and too big for me to budge.

    - Our young one did it a couple to times, but my husband and I managed to get him up by pulling his head out a bit and the ropes on the far legs.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique



  20. #20
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    I am on the small side at 135lbs and 5'7 and have had to do it. It's hard but doable in those situations. Once I had to put his halter on the attached the halter to the lead and drug him out of the run in. Yes he stall cast in a huge run in shed. The safest way was to pull him straight out. Then in a stall once I've had to put the lead rope over a back leg and over a front leg and pulled until he flipped. Then the worst time, oh boy, I sometimes let the horses around my house. It's all fenced, very safe,nothing to get hurt on. So I thought. One horse somehow got up under my front porch. I don't know how he managed that but needless to say they are not allowed in the yard anymore. Lol. I had to crawl under attach a lead to him, i could get under the porch on my knees and bent over some so I have no idea how he did it. I had to pull him around a 180 then drag him out from under the porch. I never thought any horse would try to crawl under a porch. There's nothing there I don't know to this day how he did it. But, it can be done if you are in that spot you just have to find the best method. Luckily all my horses really trust me and did not panic at all when I had to do any of these methods. They all just laid there calmly and let me do it. This has been over 10 year time so luckily it doesn't happen to often. Knock on wood.
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole



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