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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2010
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    1,498

    Default So how many whackjobs respond to your ads?

    Make me feel better. Trying to find homes for two horses and and keep getting, um, to put it kindly, unrealistic people responding to my ads. The horses are described carefully in the ads. But the respondents are truly off the wall.

    There is light at the end of the tunnel right?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    7,290

    Default

    Usually takes us a LONG time to sell a horse. We also carefully describe the horse and his skills, STILL get the riders who think they have far more skill than they do. Very inflated view of their riding ablities which must be encouraged by their riding instructors, because they are NOT showing it to me!

    None of our animals are beginner horses, though they are not complicated or difficult either, just need a moderately skilled rider who is IN CHARGE during the ride. Seems that kind of rider is harder to find as time goes by.

    You have to protect the horse from the riders that don't know what they are doing, so they don't UNTRAIN the horse during the ride. I have stopped buyers in a ride, pulled them off and told them horse was more than they needed.

    I DO BELIEVE that a lot of tire-kickers just are out for free rides, and that gets old. Same with the folks who come out and want to "get into his head" so they can be soul-mates.

    Good luck selling yours. It takes me from 6 months to a year to move a horse. We are too far out of the way for English riders to come see them. They LOVE the videos, but expect to be jerked around if they make the trip and be shown a puke. Horse can't be THAT GOOD, for that money! Their loss, because when The ONE comes to ride, they take the horse right away. Worth the wait for me! The buyers who purchase love the horse, ENJOY the horse, are glad they came. Horse seems to like them too, rides well, likes following directions from a confident rider. I LIKE selling to a person like that. We often hear about horse activities for years after.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    4,355

    Default

    Has anyone seen these horses prior to being put on sale?

    We never had an issue selling any of the kids horses when they wanted to trade up as they had buyers waiting...even the ones that were never for sale had people coming by the show grounds making offers.

    We just took everyday nice horses and worked with them to do what our kids were wanting to do at that time.....even the pony that cribbed was sold in a few weeks because it was an outstanding child's NATRC horse who my youngest daughter outgrew.

    Our horses were never project horses for sale, but project horses for our kids to learn with.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 23, 2008
    Location
    Afton, Virginia
    Posts
    204

    Default

    I really don't think people read ads beyond the first line. We have been trying to find a home for a 5 year old TWH mare who was unhandled for the first 4 years of her life. She is doing great now but still has some serious trust issues and needs an experienced person. I go into detail about all of this in our ads for her and I still get people asking if she would be good for their 4 year old to learn to ride on. Then they tend to get huffy when I tell them no it would not be a good fit. It is really frustrating!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 30, 2006
    Posts
    981

    Default

    We leased out my daughter's horse recently. I couldn't believe some of the responses I got. Two people who came (with their trainers) insisted they wanted to buy him. And I insisted he was not for sale. Then I had several asking for a free lease. This is a rock solid steady 3' hunter. Shown AA. Seriously? Free? We finally found a young girl wanting to show the low children's. It took about 3 months.

    I got so many crazy requests. One for a free lease to show him at a local schooling series. Oh my. He hadn't shown at a schooling show in about 5 years. That would be embarrassing. Several who wanted to use him for eventing. Ugh. Nothing against it but he is just not suitable. No matter how clear I made an ad I continued to get quite off the wall requests.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 26, 2000
    Posts
    3,147

    Default

    I am of the firm belief that ANY sort of advertisement with the purpose of placing an animal in a new home - whether it's a rescued guinea pig or a very fancy horse (and EVERYTHING in between) - is an invitation to the crazies. About 15 years ago I ran a breed specific rescue (non-profit, very legit) for Boxers. We were VERY VERY particular about the homes we sought, did home visits, gave dogs job skills before placement, carefully assessed their temperaments so we knew which dog could be with toddlers, which couldn't, etc. The nuts we had to deal with... Selling horses if often no different. When I've got something to sell horse-wise (haven't had to do that in a while), I call on my trainer friends & do my best NOT to place any ads...too time consuming & frustrating.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 16, 2012
    Location
    Across the Atlantic
    Posts
    172

    Default

    I was trying to sell a four year old I had started and I stated as clearly as possible in the ad that, while he had a lovely, kind nature, he required an experienced rider as he'd only been under saddle six months. He was also a 16hh draft cross.

    Most of the emails I got in response to that ad were from people wanting to buy a pony club horse for their beginner 12-year olds to whip round in mounted games. Do people actually read ads?


    2 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 2012
    Location
    La La Land
    Posts
    478

    Default

    With the way I was raised it would have been terribly rude not to respond to any and all replies to an advertisement. I dont know if its age or what, but honestly I dont even reply to some because its just so ballant that they are crazy, didnt read the ad, want it for free, or just going to show up to amuse themselves that day by being a totally offensive tire kicker.
    One couple was the ultimate of rude. He even made comments about the goat that was very clearly a pet, being ready to butcher. Or the people who want to show up for saturday pony rides for the kids that have no intention of buying.

    Wow sorry about that rant over.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2010
    Posts
    292

    Default

    Thankfully it's pretty easy to weed out some of the crazies before they come to look, via email. When I get inquiries about my green four year old from people looking for a young child's horse, a training level packer, or a free lease, I can simply reply that it is not a suitable match and be on my merry way.

    What drives me nuts is when people come out, having been thoroughly educated about the horse, and are clearly quite unsuitable. If you are a beginner and still learning your diagonals, don't come look at a horse for an experienced rider. If you are looking for a horse to trail ride on the weekends, please tell me that before coming out to look at horses that are listed at over $10k, because we both know you are not going to spend that much. I don't mind showing my horse to serious buyers, but I hate wasting hours of time so people can be entertained.

    I will say, there is light at the end of the tunnel, I promise! It just might be far, far away...


    3 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    17,780

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Caol Ila View Post
    I was trying to sell a four year old I had started and I stated as clearly as possible in the ad that, while he had a lovely, kind nature, he required an experienced rider as he'd only been under saddle six months. He was also a 16hh draft cross.

    Most of the emails I got in response to that ad were from people wanting to buy a pony club horse for their beginner 12-year olds to whip round in mounted games. Do people actually read ads?
    I had the same experience. Four year old 17.2 hh warmblood, 30 days under saddle with upper level potential, advanced rider only.

    One mother of a 6 year old was highly offended when I told her that 6 months of lessons does not an advanced rider make.

    Another wanted to keep him in her back yard for her 8 and 10 year old to "play around with." Listed price was $15,000. What the fruitbat?
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    2 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2013
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    500

    Default

    I tend to collect horses, not sell them, but this past year (2012) I had to sell two of my lesson/trail horses - first time I've sold horses in five years (I was up to 14 horses and needed to downsize a bit, lol). It only took a month or two to sell them - had a few people respond to the ads, but the very first people to come look at each of them ended up buying them. No one else came out, no competition or whatnot. It was easy.

    However, i did try to move one of my more advanced horses, and had a LOT of people that thought they knew what they were doing come out - even though horse was advertised as an ADVANCED horse NOT for beginners, had a lot of people saying "I just started riding, do you think this would be a good horse for me??" and "i'm looking for a horse for my 10 year old daughter, how do you think she would work out?"

    ugh. can people not READ a freakin ad??


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 2006
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    2,238

    Default

    However, i did try to move one of my more advanced horses, and had a LOT of people that thought they knew what they were doing come out - even though horse was advertised as an ADVANCED horse NOT for beginners

    I just sold a horse that I had started under saddle training only 15 months ago. I put her up for sale as soon as I acquired her and her price increased as her training, show mileage and accomplishments racked up. I sold her to the second person who actually came out and rode her/tried her. I had a handful of people inquire about her from the ads I put out there. One was from a "fellow" breeder who admonished me for pricing the horse way too low and insisted I up it by $9000, then she would send people my way and only charge me her finders fee (um no thanks). The others all wanted to know if I was firm on the price....um well that is what every advertisement stated and the fact that price would increase with more training and show miles. Though I had those who clearly were not a good match for the horse, there were far fewer than what I have experienced in the past. While my ads stated that the mare was green and had only been under saddle with me since "x", I believe that I had fewer inquiries overall because though the mare is solid, quiet and not flighty in the least, I listed her temperament as a 6. I truly believe it kept many of the beginner types, older ammies wanting safe/sane/easy/KMart types but still score 8s on gaits, and the younger crowd away.
    Ranch of Last Resort
    www.annwylid.com



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2008
    Posts
    424

    Default

    I think there's nut jobs on both sides. I've sold once and bought three times. I've come to believe that 2/3's of the people out there simply have no clue about horses in general. You should see what types of horses are listed as "dead quiet, perfect for beginners". At first I thought sellers were lying (and some were), but most people have no idea what a well behaved, quiet horse is like. I'm not a beginner, but at my age that's the type of trail horse I was looking for.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2007
    Location
    NY State
    Posts
    363

    Default Here's my most recent /current experience.

    Following is my craigslist ad. There are 6 photos accompanying the ad, including one taken when she was a weanling being lead over a tarp with ground poles. After the ad, see the most recent response and subsequent dialog from one "interested" person. I'm done answering this joker.


    Yearling <BREED TYPE LISTED> Filly - $<PRICE LISTED> on title line>.

    "Lucy" is a gorgeous unregistered (September, 31, 2011) <BREED LISTED> filly by a Frank Scripter/Lois Williams foundation bred few-spot stallion <STALLION LISTED>; out of a QH/Arab mare from <STALLION LISTED> breeding. Very friendly and EASY, EASY, EASY to work with. Leads, ties, stands for grooming, farrier, etc. Has free lounged in round pen and has worn a surcingle - NO problem. Current Coggins. Sire is 15.3 + (?) and dam is app. 15+ hands. Filly measured 13.3 hands on 2/11/13 and is growing fast. Pictured as a weanling (without snow) and as a yearling (with snow). She's going to be one flashy horse! $<PRICE CLEARLY STATED>.

    Inquiry:
    "Is she still for sale?"
    Response:
    "Yes she is."

    Inquiry:
    "Can you tell me about her?"
    Response:
    "She's basically described in the craigslist ad. Are there particular things you'd like to know about her?"

    Inquiry:
    "Has she had any work done with her? How old is she?"
    Response:
    "Born (September, 31, 2011). Leads, ties, stands for grooming, farrier, etc. Has free lounged in round pen and has worn a surcingle. One of the pics in the ad shows her as a weanling walking across poles/tarp."

    Response:
    "Ok great! What is her price again?"

    Oye!?!
    Last edited by CharingHounds; Feb. 19, 2013 at 09:39 AM. Reason: took out specific details that might make it an ad on COTH..


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2012
    Posts
    202

    Default

    I had one horse advertised as suitable for adult intermediate rider. Of course I got the inevitable phone call was "Can I use him to teach my 10 yr total beginner daughter?" Just because he was short apparently he was a kids horse?
    I don't think some people actually read the ads, they must just look at the pictures.
    I had a spate of tween girls inquiring one year, one thought I would hold the horse for her until she turned 16 as her parents said she could have a horse then, she was 13.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2013
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    500

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CharingHounds View Post
    "Lucy" is a gorgeous unregistered (September, 31, 2011)
    um.....


    september 31 is not a date.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2007
    Location
    NY State
    Posts
    363

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by equinekingdom View Post
    um.....


    september 31 is not a date.
    Yikes! No wonder they asked again how old she was!?!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    1,094

    Default

    Both sellers and buyers are crazy IMP. I get the usual crazy responses of "is your horse good for my little bitty kid to learn to ride on" in response to an ad for an unbroke large pony. I do make sure to put in the ad that the pony was not suitable for a child. I sometimes think they don't read past "for sale."

    Many years ago I was looking for a horse for myself but also one my son (a beginner) could ride. I drove an hour and a half to 2 hours one way several times to look at horses after being assured on the phone the horse was perfect for us, only to show up and wonder if they were trying to kill my child.

    Which actually reminds me of one I went to look at. He was advertised as 12 years old. I knew as soon as I looked at him that he was older. She told me that they were told he was 12 when they bought him but did suspect he was older. I asked how long they had him and was told a couple years. So, I guess she didn't realize horses age?


    4 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan. 28, 2013
    Location
    Southeastern US
    Posts
    1,596

    Default

    I had a whack job respond to a house bunny I was selling. She told me she was starting a rabbit sanctuary in her backyard where they could all just run free.

    Um, yeah. We still have the bunny.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2006
    Posts
    3,422

    Default

    Sorry...no light in sight!!! I find that the cheaper the price, the more the crazies come out!!! Even with expensive very large, fancy show horses I get tons of calls from "mommies" whose children have been "taking lessons for 30-60 days and we want to come look/try your 16.3 TB jumper"!! And when the weather sucks outside I get wayyyyy more calls because people are stuck indoors on the computer!!! Good luck!!!
    www.crosscreeksporthorses.com
    Breeders of Painted Thoroughbreds and Uniquely Painted Irish Sport Horses in Northeast Oklahoma


    2 members found this post helpful.

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