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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb. 17, 2013
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    10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tha Ridge View Post
    Hey, you never know—you might be able to get the NEXT Beezie!
    Beezie, Richard, McClain....really......Im not being thaaaat choosy.



  2. #22
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    Feb. 17, 2013
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    10

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    Quote Originally Posted by bornfreenowexpensive View Post
    To me...you need a ring with really good footing. Grass ring is nice but in today's market, an all weather ring of top level footing is needed.

    Will they have time to teach and space for additional training horses? Anyone who has the talent you are looking for will be able to build a larger string and want diversity in their business (not be solely dependent on your horses). The money you are offering is nice...but on the low end so you will need to create the siutation where they can grow a thriving business.

    If you like your current trainer, then as you find a candiate, make sure they will mesh with that trainer. Having good dressage help is great....but they will also need help over fences. Even the best still get the help of a good coach.

    Good luck. I'm doing something similar with event horses. I have a really great crew right now and hopefully can create a win win situation for everyone.
    A good ring is in the plan. I have plenty of land and stalls. As we sell one, I will buy two more, ad nauseum. We have some good contacts in Europe for quality horses. I am not interested however in having other people a. board here, or b. train here. This is my home, where my kids play. This is our private deal. I also would not work for 35k alone, but for the right person I believe that our opportunity surpasses merely what the salary speaks of (if that makes any sense at all). Hopefully we will find that right person. The hunt has just began and I am on no real time crunch. They are out there.

    I believe that any real rider is going to have a couple horses of their own that need to be ridden daily and competed. Within the next 12 months we will have 7-8 on the circuit (different levels and ages). I do not believe that they could realistically (without burning the candle on both ends too much) ride anyone else's horses and still do ours justice.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2001
    Location
    Finally...back in civilization, more or less
    Posts
    11,473

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    I can certainly relate to the challenge of bringing that many nice prospects along (but what a nice problem to have, yes?!)

    However - I would assume you have an enormous investment in your program, facilities and current horses. Certainly I think you can realize some economies compared to what you are paying now.... but I am not sure that you will get the quality you probably need with the structure you are proposing.

    However, IF you can offer a good pro a "home base" for a few of their own prospects/clients in addition to training and showing yours ... you may well find that the arrangement works well and benefits everyone.

    I've no idea if your facility would support that, or if you are open to sharing "your" pro with a few other private clients or sales horses.

    But if that is a possibility, I think looking into that sort of situation would get you someone with more experience, which I think is a huge issue when it comes to making up nice young horses. Of course there are quite a few very talented riders out there, great juniors moving up, etc... but not many who have the experience to develop top class young stock.

    Best of luck.

    ETA I see you want a person solely dedicated to your stock. For that, if you want a really good, qualified person I think you are going to need to offer a different comp plan. Not only because of the $$$ you are offering compared to what they could make elsewhere, but because you will not allow them to have outside clients or any horses of their own - you are making them entirely dependent on you. Most experienced pros know that these sorts of private situations are rarely long term arrangements, and are therefore leery of putting all their eggs in one basket, so to speak. That said, perhaps you *should* look for a younger, less established rider who has not yet made their reputation. That sort of person would likely view the deal more favorably, and while it's likely they will make a few mistakes along the way, it may be a better fit.
    **********
    We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
    -PaulaEdwina


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2005
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    12,645

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    Lucassb is thinking along the same line as I am and it is consistent with my experience.

    True if you have 7-8 horses competing they will not have a lot of time but for the type of talent that you want, they will most certainly want some of their own horses in training and teaching. Most of the top business expand their string enough so that they have more than one rider working with/for them.

    Also consider that not all riders get along with all horses.....and often the top level competitive riders are not always good with youngsters. I wish you luck as I think it will be hard to find someone who can be everything you are looking for.....and who will stay long term.
    Last edited by bornfreenowexpensive; Feb. 18, 2013 at 03:53 PM.
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec. 9, 2010
    Posts
    471

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    I suspect that the level of rider he is looking for, young , knowledgeable, and talented will be happy to work at the rate he offers.
    And if they are doing a good job will be busy 8+hours a day on "at home" days

    I will admit a good arena is absolutely necessary.

    Sport Horse Guy--I'm sending you a PM. and No!, I'm not applying.
    Taking it day by day!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb. 17, 2013
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    10

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    " Not only because of the $$$ you are offering compared to what they could make elsewhere, but because you will not allow them to have outside clients or any horses of their own - "

    I would be happy for them to have 2-3 horses of their own to show, sell and train. I would also be willing to foot the bill of them getting to the shows, use my equipment, stay in the hotels that I pay for while they show and sell their horses-provided that it is not a one way situation. I have had trainers in the past that have steered clients towards their own horses instead of showing everything in the barn.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2013
    Posts
    1

    Default James Fairclough

    I would contact James Fairclough, he's really good with young horses, very competitive and very hungry!



  8. #28

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    I am very interested in your inquiry ! If you could please email me either an address or an email that I could send a résumé to that would be great! My email address is taylorbattaglia343@gmail.com

    I look forward to hearing from you !
    Last edited by taylorbattaglia; Feb. 18, 2013 at 08:00 PM.



  9. #29
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    Feb. 17, 2013
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    Looks like he would be great but when you look at his facebook page he just accepted a position at a big facility in CT as the Head Trainer and rider. Too bad. Looks like he could have added a lot to the program.



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Feb. 17, 2013
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    10



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Oct. 24, 2008
    Location
    Portola Valley, CA
    Posts
    276

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    Boy I would love that job!

    But check with Julie Winkel and her intern program. She may be able to give you some leads.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 1999
    Location
    Middleburg VA and Southampton NY
    Posts
    6,095

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    Whether you find the person you are looking for will depend in large part on what the rest of your setup is like. A rider is one part of a great team, but no rider can cover every base; a good barn manager, ground person/road manager are all necessary components for success.

    You as owner may elect to wear some of these hats, but you had better be good at it to keep your horses and staff in good spirits and great shape, not looking to jump ship before you are ready to part company. If your approach is more hands off, then you need to assemble the right people, and be willing to respect and trust them while you let them do their jobs.

    It's a tricky balance sometimes--you think it's a question of getting a rider/trainer, but maybe what you need is an experienced manager/trainer who can handle the details of getting the horses prepared and schooled up, and ultimately delivered to a top tier rider on a freelance basis at the big horse shows.



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