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  1. #41
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    Oct. 1, 2005
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    Trying to land on your feet bailing from a bolting/galloping horse will get you a broken ankle or two, possibly followed by a broken wrist or arm or two when you try to break your fall before the nose plant.



  2. #42
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    Jun. 7, 2008
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    Responding to post number 41, only if you are a colossal klutz or have brittle bones. When landing on one's feet one must, of course have some flexibility of the ankle joints, and land with bent knees.
    Jeanie
    RIP Sasha, best dog ever, pictured shortly before she died, Death either by euthanasia or natural causes is only the end of the animal inhabiting its body; I believe the spirit lives on.



  3. #43
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2006
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    NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by sdlbredfan View Post
    1) kick feet out of stirrups
    2) drop reins and place hands on either side of horse's withers
    3) lean forward onto hands with elbows bent and swing your legs from the hips forward and back a couple or 3 times, building momentum on each swing
    4) when sufficient momentum has been reached, on next back swing of the legs, whilst the rider still is using hands on withers and bent elbows for stability, the rider swings the right leg in a higher arc than left, as it needs to clear the rump but both legs move
    5) rider lands ON FEET facing the same direction as the horse.
    This is how my dd was taught to "squirrel" and it is useful for somethings (probably not for riding out bucks), but in beginner lesson situations it was a good tool to get the kids off the horses quickly. E.g. one time a pasture gate got broken down and a small herd of loose horses was going to race past the side of the indoor. Kids were told "Everyone squirrel!" and they hopped off their trotting ponies and held their horses. Not a bad tool to learn.

    I started riding in my mid-30s and actually read a book for adult beginners that said teaching ED for adults beginners often ends in worse situations than a fall. (Now, I have no idea if they were referring to "squirrel" type of ED or a tuck and roll.) My trainer suggested I learn it and my first thought was a tuck and roll dismount, so I declined and said I'd take my chances.



  4. #44
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    Oct. 1, 2005
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    Sdlbrdfan, not trying to give you a hard time, but truly, what you advocate might work fine at lower speeds but will affirmatively expose the bailing rider to risk of serious injury at high speeds, klutz or not. If you 'really' need to part ways at a canter or gallop, you'd best NOT try to land on your feet, but do a parachute landing instead. I have seen far more injuries to folks bailing out in a panic (even at relatively slower speeds) than I've seen from riders just affirmatively getting dumped by horses. I'm mostly just trying to furnish food for thought for any novices reading this thread. Falling off of horses is a particular expertise of mine, but I don't ever bail first and ask questions later.



  5. #45
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    Jun. 7, 2008
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    Beverley, yes you are (unnecessarily) giving me a hard time. The instructor of my youth, (a 1930's model) who had learned most of what she knew (including ED) from a former Army Cavalry Officer from back in the days that they actually used horses (pre 1940's) had us practice ED at all gaits. No one was injured in the process. If the horse is moving faster than a walk then the ED'ing rider has to be able to hit the ground running. If someone is too creaky to do that, then maybe it is time to ride the rocking chair. I am in my 6th decade but still am flexible and fit enough to do an ED if the need arose.

    As others have mentioned the Pony Club still includes this in its curriculum. If you are 'dissing' the pony club training program, then you seriously need to enlarge your horsemanship horizons.

    ETA link to US Pony Clubs info, very similar to what I posted, but I had not looked at it prevously. The part that is different in the USPC is they advocate keeping a hold of the reins, which is not what I was taught. Presumably we were told to drop the reins because we were in a small arena and because that was going to make it easier to use the hands on withers to provide stability for the leg swings without risking injury to the horse's mouth:
    http://books.google.com/books?id=wgB...d=0CCYQ6AEwBA#
    "
    Last edited by sdlbredfan; Feb. 23, 2013 at 06:46 PM. Reason: clarity
    Jeanie
    RIP Sasha, best dog ever, pictured shortly before she died, Death either by euthanasia or natural causes is only the end of the animal inhabiting its body; I believe the spirit lives on.



  6. #46
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    Oct. 1, 2005
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    Sandy, Utah
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    Sdlbred, I have not dissed you or any training program. Get Over Yourself. I HAVE seen injuries resulting from what you are advocating. THAT IS ALL I AM SAYING. And I'll bet everyone but you processed that! Again, take a deep breath and quit taking yourself so seriously. You aren't the only one in these parts who had excellent instructors in their youth.



  7. #47
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    Nov. 30, 2009
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    DROP the reins!!! NEVER hold on to them when dismounting in a sketchy situation. I dislocated both arms within 20 minutes when holding onto reins while being bucked off. First the pony dumped me off the right side, dislocating the right arm...i got it back in, and mad as hell, got back on. The stinker popped me off the other side after the next jump and I dislocated the left. If I had not held on to the reins, I would have been fine. My shoulders are still messed up thirty years later, buti have learned my lesson. Let go of the reins!!!


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