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  1. #21
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    Feb. 1, 2012
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    Just curious...why would a foot that is too hard cause a horse to be unsound?
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  2. #22
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    Oct. 28, 2010
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    DFW
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    Hi S,

    I just looked at the ingredients of Rain Maker, and nothing listed is what I understand a "drying agent"

    http://www.drsfostersmith.com/produc...m?pcatid=16001


    Is there something I'm missing?

    Thx



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun. 8, 2003
    Posts
    153

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    What about a hoof packing like Forshners for the soles?
    then you can still use a topical moisturizer like Rainmaker or something too



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2006
    Location
    NY
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    4,386

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    Hi S,

    I just looked at the ingredients of Rain Maker, and nothing listed is what I understand a "drying agent"

    http://www.drsfostersmith.com/produc...m?pcatid=16001


    Is there something I'm missing?

    Thx
    No, I just looked at your link and I agree with you that it looks ok (from my lay person's opinion). At one point my farrier cautioned me against "hoof conditioners" because a lot of them contain formaldehyde and maybe turpentine...? I would definitely ask my farrier if I were concerned about "dryness" and hardness overall because topical products might not help and might make things worse. Things like hoof oil may not *really* change the quality of the hoof but might make it easier to trim. Which might help a little but maybe not get to the heart of a lameness issue.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2003
    Location
    Where is gets way too cold
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    A recent study (IIRC) indicated that external moisture (mud, dressings, etc) does very little to soften horn, just the sole (and frog, I'd imagine). I can't recall the exact study and can't get my thehorse.com account to open, but here is a link for you to read it:
    http://www.thehorse.com/articles/297...ration-studied

    My farrier uses a small blow torch on the feet for a few seconds if they are super hard.
    *CrowneDragon*
    As Peter, Paul, and Mary say, a dragon lives forever.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
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    Oct. 28, 2010
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    DFW
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    Thx for the quick response. My farrier knows I use this one, and will comment after a trim that I should be applying more regularity if their feet are extremely dry.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
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    12,462

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    Quote Originally Posted by CrowneDragon View Post
    A recent study (IIRC) indicated that external moisture (mud, dressings, etc) does very little to soften horn, just the sole (and frog, I'd imagine). I can't recall the exact study and can't get my thehorse.com account to open, but here is a link for you to read it:
    http://www.thehorse.com/articles/297...ration-studied

    My farrier uses a small blow torch on the feet for a few seconds if they are super hard.
    My farrier uses the torch too.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Greensboro, NC
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuckerForHorses View Post
    Just curious...why would a foot that is too hard cause a horse to be unsound?
    Careful, that's apparently a question lacking in horsemanship
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET


    11 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Sep. 15, 2008
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,470

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    I use fiebings dressing directly on the sole of the hoof. Since I do trim most of my own horses, it helps with some of them that have super hard soles. I use it a week prior to trimming.

    What about plain vaseline? I've never tried it, but I know people put it on their feet with socks on to soften them up.



  10. #30
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    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Greensboro, NC
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2BayPonies View Post
    Hi S,

    I just looked at the ingredients of Rain Maker, and nothing listed is what I understand a "drying agent"

    http://www.drsfostersmith.com/produc...m?pcatid=16001


    Is there something I'm missing?

    Thx
    Regular use of petroleum-based products tends to "melt" the protective outer layer, which screws with the hoof's very good ability to manage moisture intake and output, so if the outlying environment is already dry, it can end up making it brittle, and it can end up allowing to much moisture in when in a wetter environment.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #31
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    Aug. 25, 2012
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    641

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    Suggestions seem reasonable as well as the questions being asked to try and understand the situation as best as possible. OP not sure why you are so snarky and rude if you didn't want questions or suggestions probably shouldn't ask the question and just stick with your reputable professionals who know your horse.


    12 members found this post helpful.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2010
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    2,432

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    Any farrier/trimmer or vet who told me my horse was sore because his hooves are too hard would no longer be caring for my horse. Because that's just not possible. As others have noted, the farrier/trimmer not being able to trim sufficiently because of the hard hooves and the horse having overlaid bar and/or retained sole? THAT, I would believe. And in that case I would either soak the hooves with water or use something like this -- http://www.herbsoftheworld.com/Like-...ming_p_68.html -- ONLY prior to trimming.

    I know you don't want to hear it. But we are all just trying to share our own knowledge/experience with you, because maybe it will help your horse. Then again, someone who has such a helpful poster as JB on ignore probably doesn't want to hear anyone's opinion but his/her own.


    7 members found this post helpful.

  13. #33
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    Oct. 28, 2010
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    DFW
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    Can you link me to article(s) regarding this?

    What would constitute regular use? 2x week year round, or less?

    I generally use Rainmaker in the summer months, and once a week generally unless my farrier mentions their feet are extremely dry. I then "try" to use more often, but its a messy business.

    Just looking for clarification so I can discuss with my guy next visit.




    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    Regular use of petroleum-based products tends to "melt" the protective outer layer, which screws with the hoof's very good ability to manage moisture intake and output, so if the outlying environment is already dry, it can end up making it brittle, and it can end up allowing to much moisture in when in a wetter environment.



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Dec. 3, 2002
    Location
    Florida
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    854

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    OP. I AM an OLLLLLLD Horsewoman, could probably be your grandmother.
    The other posters and I have tried to tell you what we would do. We also tried to tell you, there is no such hoof that breaks hoof knives due to hardness, or becomes UNSOUND due to hardness UNLESS that "professional"
    is not properly attending to the nuances of proper trimming. Don't beat up on the messenger.

    Why in the world would you put an OLD Horsewoman like JB on ignore when 99.99999999% of the time she's spot on accurate on her suggestions when answering questions on here. Yes, she directly asks other questions, but only because that helps in making other suggestions- to try and help you w/ your questions.

    Maybe you're having a BAD day, we all have those but we ARE trying to help you. So to sum up.....

    Water is a moisturizing softener for hooves- fact.
    All hooves dry out after being wet- fact.
    Hoof knives generally do NOT break easily.
    Nothing bad about mechanized Abrasive Trimming- just quicker and easier for trimmer.
    Not all reputable professionals are equal.

    Peace!


    3 members found this post helpful.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2013
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    500

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    I love Rainmaker and Fiebings. Both fabulous, keep feet moisturized and healthy.



  16. #36
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    Feb. 5, 2010
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    Yes, the grinder can be a god-send! My trimmer used it on a foundered mare (after x-rays, of course!) and she was able to trim the mare so much faster, which was obviously a great thing for the mare. Heck, my vet trims his own horses and he uses the grinder on all of them because it's easier on his back. It's not for every horse or every hoof, but don't discount it.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #37
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    Nov. 4, 2003
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    Dallas, Georgia
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    16,615

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    And while I have never touted myself as a professional, I will say that in my experience trimming my own mares and a few others locally, adding any goop, goo, salve, etc. sets up an unhealthy hoof environment and opens the door to bacteria, fungus & yeast to move in and dine.

    Dry and hard is a good thing.
    <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- "When they try to tell you these are your Golden years, don't believe 'em.... It's rust."


    3 members found this post helpful.

  18. #38
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    Feb. 5, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by equinekingdom View Post
    I love Rainmaker and Fiebings. Both fabulous, keep feet moisturized and healthy.
    You should read this article -- http://www.thehorse.com/articles/133...t-studies-show


    2 members found this post helpful.

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Dec. 7, 2008
    Posts
    257

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sansena View Post
    It used to be CoTH was populated by folks who actually wanted to share knowledge instead of come and look their nose down on others who had a different philosophy.

    It used to be CoTH was THE source to have healthy discussion based upon diverse backgrounds and experiences. Now it's populated by a bunch of half educated, self appointed 'experts'.

    It used to be that horsemanship was the backbone of the US industry. Now it's a pasttime taken up by those who would rather pay someone else to handle a problem instead of doing the backbreaking work themselves, and speak with others who have done similar backbreaking work, so they could compare experiences and take into accounts different work environments, careers, goals. Used to be a bunch of old horsemen could share 'secret' recipes, therapies, compare products instead of passing judgement on half assumed guesses.

    This thread pretty much confirms what I've suspected.
    Horsemanship is dead.

    If you're looking for a more direct answer to your question, then by all means google it, or use another online database. The people on here are living breathing people and not algorithms; they have every right to attempt to answer a question by asking another question. Sometimes more information is needed before good advice can be offered--I'm not sure why you want a definitive answer on a topic, when the general consensus is that there is something wrong with your premises.

    If you don't think much of other people's opinions, then you should probably stop asking questions on a forum.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Greensboro, NC
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marla 100 View Post
    there is no such hoof that breaks hoof knives due to hardness,
    I politely beg to differ I truly believe these feet exist. I know at least 2 farriers who have this trouble in the Summer with some of their clients' horses' hooves. The horses live in a dry, arid region, very little moisture unless it's snow cover during the Winter and melt off in the Spring. By the end of the long, dry Summer, some of their feet really, truly do break knives, BUT, the horses are sound.

    or becomes UNSOUND due to hardness UNLESS that "professional"
    is not properly attending to the nuances of proper trimming. Don't beat up on the messenger.
    Exactly - someone who throws out that statement and then gets mortally offended when asked to clarify why someone said "feet are so hard it's making the horse unsound" probably doesn't really know and is just projecting embarrassment at not knowing, into being pissy.

    Why in the world would you put an OLD Horsewoman like JB
    I refuse to be old! If you could be the OP's g'ma, you could be mine too

    on ignore when 99.99999999% of the time she's spot on accurate on her suggestions when answering questions on here. Yes, she directly asks other questions, but only because that helps in making other suggestions- to try and help you w/ your questions.
    Thank you to you and Frizzle
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



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