The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 98
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 6, 2003
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    3,448

    Default Softening his feet?

    I know most post about wanting to toughen the feet/ soles but I have the opposite problem. Farrier could break hoof knives on my horse, but his feet are TOO hard now and it's affecting his soundness.

    Any suggestions for hoof packing, dressing, poultice, soaks, etc. that may make these feet a wee bit more pliable?

    Ugh.. I can't wait for summer.

    Thanks.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2011
    Posts
    935

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sansena View Post
    his feet are TOO hard now and it's affecting his soundness.
    Thanks.
    I really doubt it...


    4 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 3, 2002
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    858

    Default

    Soaking hooves w/ water will make hooves more pliable- this is why I prefer to trim AFTER a nice slow rain.

    I can't imagine hard hooves would have anything to do with soundness unless the farrier is just not trimming properly and leaving excess sole and bars.

    I understand some horses get rock hard feet, but it's the farrier/trimmers job to still trim properly to have a functional foot.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Georgia
    Posts
    16,631

    Default

    Just soak his feet for about 15 minutes in warm water before your farrier arrives. Otherwise, HARD and dry is a very good thing.

    Either that or find a trimmer who uses a hand grinder. No nippers needed and even 8+ months of overgrowth can be safely removed in about half the time and with a lot less effort... easier on the farrier/trimmer and easier on the horse.
    <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- "When they try to tell you these are your Golden years, don't believe 'em.... It's rust."



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,698

    Default

    Who is saying the hardness is affecting his soundness?

    The only thing I can think of is there is such hardness that sole is not exfoliating and you may have retained sole which is affecting his soundness.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 6, 2003
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    3,448

    Default

    Gee.. thanks for all the great suggestions on keeping his feet softer. Soaking in water is just going to promote further drying again/ hardening, once the feet dry and any moisture evaporates away.

    No, I"m not going to machinery to shorten his feet. And yes, we are literally breaking hoof knives. It would be lovely if people could simply answer the direct question without playing armchair vet or farrier. This horse is under the care of well reputed professionals. I think I'll take their advice as opposed to the unfounded, half informed snark coming from some of you here.

    I don't feel the need to post my horse's medical history to a bunch of strangers here. Lord knows it'll come back to bite me in the ass.

    So, once again: If any one can please offer suggestions for softening feet, I'd be much obliged. Thank you again.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2004
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    3,986

    Default

    I don't know about a softening effect, but Keratex Hoof Gel (not the hardener) worked really well for us last summer during the drought. It helps the hoof maintain moisture balance, so might be something to look into.
    Caitlin
    *OMGiH I Loff my Mare* and *My Saddlebred Can Do Anything Your Horse Can Do*
    http://community.webshots.com/user/redmare01


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,698

    Default

    Very often, the question asked isn't the right question - that's why people tend to ask questions to get more information instead of just blindly tossing out suggestions that might be wrong for the situation

    I haven't met a farrier yet who breaks knifes and says "it's a wonder this horse is sound because of his hard feet".
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET


    8 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 6, 2003
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    3,448

    Default

    Moisturizing +/- = softening.

    Sorry that was such a leap.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2006
    Posts
    9,991

    Default

    Wow when you post on hoof care threads one not only gets snark from farriers and other trimmers but OPs too!

    Look, on planet Earth water does equal moisture.


    8 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2004
    Location
    South Park
    Posts
    3,150

    Default

    Why don't you ask your vet and other "well reputed professionals " what they recommend? They are the ones that know your horse and his living conditions.
    A friend told me I was delusional. I almost fell off my unicorn.


    10 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2004
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    2,962

    Default

    If you have well reputed professionals working for you, why are you on here instead of asking them?
    send some of their smart literate deer who can read road signs up here since ours are just run of the mill dumb ones who get splatted all over creation because they won't stay in the woods


    11 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 6, 2003
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    3,448

    Default

    It used to be CoTH was populated by folks who actually wanted to share knowledge instead of come and look their nose down on others who had a different philosophy.

    It used to be CoTH was THE source to have healthy discussion based upon diverse backgrounds and experiences. Now it's populated by a bunch of half educated, self appointed 'experts'.

    It used to be that horsemanship was the backbone of the US industry. Now it's a pasttime taken up by those who would rather pay someone else to handle a problem instead of doing the backbreaking work themselves, and speak with others who have done similar backbreaking work, so they could compare experiences and take into accounts different work environments, careers, goals. Used to be a bunch of old horsemen could share 'secret' recipes, therapies, compare products instead of passing judgement on half assumed guesses.

    This thread pretty much confirms what I've suspected.
    Horsemanship is dead.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Georgia
    Posts
    16,631

    Default

    Well, I did share knowledge. I trim my own draft horses who have huge, rock hard, dry feet. If I were to trim with a rasp, I'd soak their feet in warm water so it would be easier to nip & rasp, therefore, less hard on my body & easier on them.

    However, I trim with a grinder, so no softening needed prior to said trim.

    It was info shared to add to your choices. Das ist alles
    <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- "When they try to tell you these are your Golden years, don't believe 'em.... It's rust."


    10 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2004
    Location
    South Park
    Posts
    3,150

    Default

    That is complete nonsense.
    Why would someone on a computer hundreds of miles away that only knows half the story be more knowledgeable about what your horse needs than a team of experts that knows you and your horse and his living conditions first hand?
    That is why people that are attempting to help you want to know more.
    The answer to your question would vary greatly depending on whether your horse is stalled 24/7, in a huge pasture, in rainy wet Seattle or dry high desert Santa Fe. It might depend on what your horse's diet is (one often "feeds"hooves and coats from the inside out.) It might depend on what medical conditions he has, what terrain/footing he is ridden on, etc.
    So no, there might not be an "easy" answer to your question, unless it is by your local DVM or professional farrier.
    A friend told me I was delusional. I almost fell off my unicorn.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,698

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sansena View Post
    It used to be CoTH was populated by folks who actually wanted to share knowledge instead of come and look their nose down on others who had a different philosophy.
    People still do want to share knowledge - it's done 1000 times a day. I don't see ANY down-looking here, merely seeking to better understand the situation so someone might be able to actually give the help that YOU are looking for.

    It used to be CoTH was THE source to have healthy discussion based upon diverse backgrounds and experiences. Now it's populated by a bunch of half educated, self appointed 'experts'.
    Based on....what exactly? Since when is "healthy discussion" only about answering a single question? That usually just leads to bad information since the whole picture, or at least more of it, isn't known.

    It used to be that horsemanship was the backbone of the US industry. Now it's a pasttime taken up by those who would rather pay someone else to handle a problem instead of doing the backbreaking work themselves, and speak with others who have done similar backbreaking work, so they could compare experiences and take into accounts different work environments, careers, goals. Used to be a bunch of old horsemen could share 'secret' recipes, therapies, compare products instead of passing judgement on half assumed guesses.
    Where the flock did this come from?

    Half assumed guesses? Well now, isn't that exactly what you're asking people to do? Would you rather people just not answer you because they don't want to offer up a potential solution that isn't the best thing for you, or risk getting body slammed because they dare ask a pertinent question?

    It used to be on COTH that people loved getting helped by others, even if it meant having to give more info so they could get the best potential answer. It's people like you that make folks like me not even want to bother
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET


    9 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct. 28, 2010
    Location
    DFW
    Posts
    204

    Default

    When my guys get rock hard from the dry Texas ground, my farrier usually suggests using a hoof conditioner like Rainmaker every couple of days. I also let the area around the waterer stay moist by emptying it throughout the day.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan. 6, 2003
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    3,448

    Default

    So far it's:

    Soak in water
    Mechanical rasp and
    Keratex Hoof Gel.

    Thanks.
    ....... ETA: and Rainmaker..

    Thank you again.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan. 6, 2003
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    3,448

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    ..<snip>... It's people like you that make folks like me not even want to bother
    Fabulous news.. given that you've been on 'ignore' for a while now.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    4,426

    Default

    Check the ingredients in Rainmaker; some of the hoof "conditioners" actually contain just as many drying ingredients as moisturizing ingredients.

    Maybe something like Fiebings Hoof Dressing or a hoof "oil" versus a conditioner might help; the problem is that some of them are really oily and messy. But it might help keep them moisturized.

    My farrier recommends putting them in damp bedding (e.g. wood pellets) for an hour or so before trimming. While in theory moisture might contribute to "drying out" of hooves, it's probably impossible to prevent them ever getting wet unless you're in an extremely dry climate anyway...just makes it a bit easier for your farrier.



Similar Threads

  1. Softening leather
    By ArabX3 in forum Dressage
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Nov. 15, 2012, 10:17 AM
  2. Softening tall boots?
    By Vero in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Apr. 16, 2012, 10:25 AM
  3. Softening my hands
    By AffirmedHope in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: Feb. 16, 2011, 08:19 PM
  4. Softening leather?
    By electric stride in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: Jul. 18, 2010, 03:06 PM
  5. Softening Venice Turpentine
    By Mali in forum Off Course
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Aug. 30, 2009, 12:20 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness