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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2002
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    Henrico, NC 36 30'50.49" N 77 50'17.47" W
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    Quote Originally Posted by shakeytails View Post

    Somehow I don't think they'd be interested in minor concrete removal...
    Actually, this is the kind of small jobs they show how to do on that show. Same guys, but not the same show as This Old House.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,104

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    The sucking sound generally is the lines emptying, if your hydrant is higher than other lines.

    Generally, we put a bit of gravel on the top few inches around the faucet, but didn't there, where the picture was taken.
    One of those things you leave for later and is still not done.
    All it has is some sand and stuff tries to grow on it.

    I would put something there that lets water seep thru, so when you overflow a bucket or other, water will go right down, not onto the concrete.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2005
    Location
    Kentucky
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    4,326

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    Couldn't find a concrete saw to rent or borrow, but DH made a few more cuts with the diamond blade on the circular saw and is now hammering away with a big Milwaukee electric hammer and making fairly quick progress. We showed the guy (plumber who was just a kid and working towards his master plumber license when he plumbed our barn apartment) pictures of what little progress we'd made on the concrete and he said ick. He said he'd be happy to help with the plumbing part but didn't want to do the excavation part. Hopefully we won't have to call him. I"m sure he'll balk at excepting anything, but is $50 a fair tool rental price?

    The supply pipe is 3/4 PVC (I hate that black pipe!), and DH is pretty sure there's no brass nipple. It should be just cut back and glue because I did get a 6" nipple for the new hydrant.

    I'm not sure what exactly the noise is, but with the hose attached and turned off I could still hear it. I'm just glad I did because while I didn't exactly time it, watching the water meter it was at least a gallon every few minutes- that would be one hefty water bill if it went undetected for very long!



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2010
    Location
    Gum Tree PA
    Posts
    1,069

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    Quote Originally Posted by shakeytails View Post
    Couldn't find a concrete saw to rent or borrow, but DH made a few more cuts with the diamond blade on the circular saw and is now hammering away with a big Milwaukee electric hammer and making fairly quick progress. We showed the guy (plumber who was just a kid and working towards his master plumber license when he plumbed our barn apartment) pictures of what little progress we'd made on the concrete and he said ick. He said he'd be happy to help with the plumbing part but didn't want to do the excavation part. Hopefully we won't have to call him. I"m sure he'll balk at excepting anything, but is $50 a fair tool rental price?

    The supply pipe is 3/4 PVC (I hate that black pipe!), and DH is pretty sure there's no brass nipple. It should be just cut back and glue because I did get a 6" nipple for the new hydrant.

    I'm not sure what exactly the noise is, but with the hose attached and turned off I could still hear it. I'm just glad I did because while I didn't exactly time it, watching the water meter it was at least a gallon every few minutes- that would be one hefty water bill if it went undetected for very long!
    While the fact you used PVC will make short work of splicing/repairing the line and elbow it is not designed for underground use. It has very low shear strength and it can crack/break easily from ground movement, settling pressure over time. I would be very hesitant using it this way in the future. It won’t stand much movement especially the glued couplings if the hydrant has a “wobble” to it. And they all develop this over time, cemented or not. I hear you about ‘black poly” pipe PIA to splice. But it is widely used for a reason. 3/4 inch PEX would be a much better choice and can be bough in long rolls. It is easily spliced using “Shark Bite” couplings and fittings that just slip on and are easily taken off with an inexpensive tool. IMO PEX is not as widely used as it should be because of easy installation and repair which cuts down substantially on “billing time”.

    Yes, leaks can be very expensive in KY at least around the Lexington area. It is interesting that just about all of the farms in the Lexington area have utility delivered water. Older farms have the old galvanized pipe running all through them. Some of my friends have shown me some pretty eye opening water bills from undetected leaks!

    IMO $50 would be fair unless the bit got torn up.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2011
    Posts
    906

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    If you are truly losing that much water underground, you are going to have a huge mess getting that hydrant out. You may even have a large area under the concrete washed out. Do you have water running out of the ground anywhere?



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2002
    Location
    Henrico, NC 36 30'50.49" N 77 50'17.47" W
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    PVC is mostly all that has been used for underground water supply lines around here for at least 40 years.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2005
    Location
    Kentucky
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    Y'all ain't gonna believe this crap. The leak was a hole worn through the galvanized elbow- must've been sitting on a sharp rock or something...

    The plumber we borrowed the hammer from said he's never seen anything like it... and flat out refused to take any money for use of the tool.

    re: PEX. When we did the plumbing here it wasn't in widespread use and just starting to become popular. Even though I've never had a lick of trouble from the PVC, if I ever build anything again, it will be Pex tubing, just 'cuz it's better.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2005
    Location
    Kentucky
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    Quote Originally Posted by gumtree View Post
    Yes, leaks can be very expensive in KY at least around the Lexington area. It is interesting that just about all of the farms in the Lexington area have utility delivered water.
    I'm south of Louisville, but a leak still wouldn't be cheap. That county water was a godsend during the ice storm a couple of years ago. If we had been on a well we wouldn't have had water either for 10 days. I can make do without electric, running water not so much! After being on a well and subject to power outages and drought, I'm happy to pay my water bill every month.



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