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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Oct. 11, 2002
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    4,605

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    Quote Originally Posted by Guilherme View Post
    Because the salesman was very good.........

    Plumcreek gave pretty good advice......... American equine industry is in contraction and will be so for many years. The Boomers are aging out and the kids are more interested in video games and Tweeting than riding......... ........, but that means a condo with support services, not a "planned" community.

    G.
    Thanks.

    Some people just like the larger lots in an equestrian community. I call them the "space people". They are the ones that either love to watch horses pass by or alternately may try to block off the equestrian trail easement on the edge of their property.

    The 'Boomers' are actually buying horses and trail riding and showing. The over 50 division in AQHA is as large as the youth division, and often larger than the under 50 amateur division at the shows. (The trainers LOOOOOVE the seniors because they want full service and buy nice horses) The pre-teen girls are still wanting horses.

    What if that condo came with a central equestrian complex for your geriatric, smooth gaited trail riding horse???
    Comprehensive Equestrian Site Planning and Facility Design
    www.lynnlongplanninganddesign.com



  2. #42
    Join Date
    Apr. 27, 2008
    Posts
    2,318

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    I would love to live in an equestrian community. I would love to have access to an indoor riding arena, obstacles, trails, etc. Would be my dream come true. Well, actually, what I have now is my dream come true now that I think about it. When I was younger and dreaming, it didn't occur to me to dream about an indoor riding arena.
    I have a Fjord! Life With Oden


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Aug. 8, 2007
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    1,230

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    While I think it would be really awesome to own a house in an equestrian community, I do think resell would be a concern. There are several neighborhoods in the triangle area of NC where you dont own your own land, but there is a neighborhood barn. The lots are all fairly large for a neighborhood (usually around an acre) and you can board your horse at the barn. There are lots of people in the neighborhood that arent horse people and the houses usually sell very quickly. You might not have your own farm, but your horse is within walking distance.



  4. #44
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2000
    Location
    Pretty much horse heaven
    Posts
    2,824

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    I see that the Traces Equestrian Community (http://tracesequestriancommunity.com/) in Landrum/Tryon is still advertising to lot buyers and describing the central barn as closed to the public and "only people who own a lot or a home in the Traces can board their horses in the Equestrian Center." Yet the barn itself is for sale (http://www.sheelahclarkson.com/horsefarms/landrum/) and could leave the lot owners without access: "This convenient complex has provided the setting for a successful boarding barn business and also lends itself to the ideal setting for a private equestrian training center."

    There are plenty of other examples of these community barn situations not being particularly stable. If you buy into a community like Hatchaway or Three Runs or Bridle Creek where everyone has their own farm and just shares amenities like trails and arenas and their upkeep, you aren't as vulnerable to the personalities and economies of running a successful boarding business being key to the communities' success and stability.

    Be wary of developers' promises. Ideally, look at what already exists in an equestrian community and decided whether you will be happy being there if nothing further in the grand plan materializes.

    It's a cautionary tale reading this old 2005 Aiken Horse article on equestrian developments in Aiken. Three Runs wasn't even on the radar. Many of the developments and plans mentioned haven't stood the test of time. The idea of Barrington Hills with gallop lanes wide enough to pony five polo ponies is pretty laughable now (it's a slow developing non-horse subdivision). NOTHING took off with Longleaf, I think one single lot sold? Too many people jumped into the real estate market with big ideas before it crashed:
    http://www.theaikenhorse.com/Paradise.htm

    Three Runs is outselling other equestrian communities in Aiken by a longshot. There were 25 or more lots sold there in 2012 compared to something like 2 in Bridle Creek (one may have been a foreclosure) and possibly one in one other development (at least that was info current from realtors in Oct/Nov).

    Each community has it's own character and strengths and it's important to look at them individually, as some have broken the code on doing it well, and others have jumped on the bandwagon without realizing what they were getting into. I know people living in Bridle Creek, Cedar Meadows, Chime Bell Station, Chime Bell Chase, Fox Chase, Hatchaway Bridge, and Three Runs. Most of them are happy with their decision, some are delighted.
    Hindsight bad, foresight good.



  5. #45
    Join Date
    Apr. 9, 2006
    Posts
    275

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    We have a few here in the Washington, DC suburbs that are still hanging on. They are older (1950's-60's), and are a little different than most of the ones described above. Lots are of varying sizes and were built gradually and individually, so people have whatever house/barn/amenities they desired. There are trail easements and community facilities - one has a boarding barn run by the HOA (though most community members keep the horses on their own property and just use the rings there), another just has community rings. Most people are relatively laid back and there are a wide range of riders and horse owners, from top competitors to pleasure riders and everything in between. I enjoy the community aspect because I can use all my land for turnout (and therefore deal with smaller acreage) and just use the community rings and trails, which everyone helps to maintain. Even though neighbors are closer than they would be in an area of large horse farms, I've never had a problem with anyone being too nosy, and definitely have much more privacy than at a boarding barn. Also, its nice that some neighbors can see my horses from the road or their homes, so if there is a problem and I'm not home someone will notice.



  6. #46
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2000
    Location
    Aiken, SC
    Posts
    2,363

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    Pay particular attention to the details in the developments Covenants, By-Laws and Rules and Regs.
    Other things to look into.
    Check the finances of the POA/HOA. Is it properly funded? Any looming special assessments?
    Has the turnover occurred or does the Developer still have control?
    Read the minutes of POA/HOA past annual meetings to get a better understanding of issues, topics of discussion, etc.

    ACC (Architectural Control Commettee)? Past exceptions?



  7. #47
    Join Date
    Sep. 26, 2011
    Location
    WNC
    Posts
    699

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    In response to BADGER'S post re TRACES in Tryon/Landrum area... I live in this area, which is very horsey, but The Traces has never been embraced as a concept here. It started years ago with 1-acre lots offered for $90,000+ and then you pay upwards of $350-400/month for board; no particular trainer or discipline attached at that time.

    In this area you could buy decent farmland for $10-12,000/acre back then and many more people liked that approach than the pricey small lot with central barn. We have many good boarding options in this area, but it seems the majority of people still prefer to have their horses at home.

    We bought in an equestrian community but different than what you all have been describing. In our case the lots are from 7-30 acres, there are deeded neighborhood trails in our community and we connect to a private area trail system with more than 50 miles of trails. We have no central barn, we all have our horses on our own properties. The benefits are you can horse-keep the way you want to and have none of the central-barn drama but you're surrounded by other horse people and it's easy to find someone to ride with or go to any of the other local horse activities. We help each other with horse emergencies and swap out horse-sitting needs. There are several equestrian communities like ours in the Tryon/Landrum area; they've been well accepted and properties usually sell pretty quickly (which, of course, is relative in today's economy). And there are dozens of trainers all over the place in Tryon/Landrum so nobody's lacking for those options.

    Maybe some people considering an equestrian community would prefer a lower-key version like ours.
    It's just grass and water till it hits the ground.



  8. #48
    Join Date
    Oct. 11, 2002
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    4,605

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    Quote Originally Posted by pds View Post
    Pay particular attention to the details in the developments Covenants, By-Laws and Rules and Regs.
    Other things to look into.
    Check the finances of the POA/HOA. Is it properly funded? Any looming special assessments?
    Has the turnover occurred or does the Developer still have control?
    Read the minutes of POA/HOA past annual meetings to get a better understanding of issues, topics of discussion, etc.

    ACC (Architectural Control Commettee)? Past exceptions?
    Very good advice.
    The point where the developer turns over any centralized equestrian facilities to the residents is indeed the watershed moment. If the facilities have been built for economic longevity, and have adaquate funding provisions, you won't mind being responsible for a piece of it. If these facilities have been built more to impress and sell lots, the turnover moment is often traumatic, and that is when things end, or the facilities are put up for lease or sale to an operator. That is not the scenario under which you bought your property. The fancier the facilities, the more scrutiny needed by you, the potential resident.
    Comprehensive Equestrian Site Planning and Facility Design
    www.lynnlongplanninganddesign.com



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