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  1. #1
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    Jan. 21, 2010
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    Default VEE in Louisiana?

    This is my first round of spring shots since I have moved to LA, and I have gotten conflicting reports from vets in the area about whether Venezuelan encephalitis is a "required" or simply optional vaccine in Louisiana. Any input from this crew?

    If it's not absolutely necessary, I'm hesitant to give it, especially to my old guys as they've had reactions to other vaccines (rhino) in the past.



  2. #2
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    Sep. 29, 2009
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    Default

    I do and I live in a less buggy area (well maybe) than you do.

    N. AL.

    I will be giving spring shots 3/1 to my coming 7 yr old. This horse is ok with rhino.

    I have had horses young and old have HORRIBLE reactions to rhino. I quit giving it to them. I just got shots with no rhino iow.



  3. #3
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    Jun. 25, 2004
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    Default

    VEE has been required in most all southern states since the 1970's. Mine and other horses where I have boarded and worked have received this vacine with NO or very little reaction.

    VEE/EEE are nasty diseases, insect (mosquito mainly) borne and easily protected against. Here is a link for more info. Tell your vet about your horse's prior reactions so he/she can research possible steps to take.

    Welcome to the sunny, humid South!
    "Never do anything that you have to explain twice to the paramedics."
    Courtesy my cousin Tim



  4. #4
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    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Greensboro, NC
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    Default

    Given the location, I think I'd give it, at least for a couple of years. Since he's never had it before, and since he does have a reaction to another vaccine, I'd give it separately.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  5. #5
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    Jan. 21, 2010
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    Default

    The AAEP states it hasn't been diagnosed in the US for over 35 years, and that cross-protection may be acquired from routine vaccination with WEE/EEE. They don't state anything about VEE vaccine recommendations in the southern states, which is what led me to my inquiry. I have heard that it has been diagnosed in Mexico, so that the "high risk" area in the US is southern TX. Not LA.



  6. #6
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    Since he's never had it before, and since he does have a reaction to another vaccine, I'd give it separately.
    Unfortunately you can't find it separately, which is my concern.



  7. #7
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    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Greensboro, NC
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    Default

    Oh boo
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  8. #8
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    Nov. 1, 2005
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    500

    Default

    My vet here in SE Texas recommends it. He said there has not been a case in years, but there is so much travel through this area to just give it. I geve my mare with reactions the VEE/WEE/EEE tetanus without problems.

    Forgot to add, if your in the south part of the state I would give it. If your more north I not sure what to tell you.
    Last edited by Proud To Be Spotted; Feb. 13, 2013 at 05:04 PM.



  9. #9
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    Jun. 25, 2004
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by morganpony86 View Post
    The AAEP states it hasn't been diagnosed in the US for over 35 years, and that cross-protection may be acquired from routine vaccination with WEE/EEE. They don't state anything about VEE vaccine recommendations in the southern states, which is what led me to my inquiry. I have heard that it has been diagnosed in Mexico, so that the "high risk" area in the US is southern TX. Not LA.
    "We" in the South have been testing for and vaccinating against VEE/WEE/EEE for 40+ years. Might explain the lack of diagnoses in the past 35 years.
    You might want to look at how some human diseases are re-occurring, such as the measles, because people are reluctant to immunize their children.

    However the horse is yours and you should do what you think is best.
    "Never do anything that you have to explain twice to the paramedics."
    Courtesy my cousin Tim



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO
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    Default

    "Required"? Are there ANY "required" vaccines for horses? Recommended, sure...

    I thought the only REQUIRED vax was rabies, for cats and dogs?

    Morganpony, I'd got with whatever your vet recommends for your particular horse with his hisotry of vaccine reactions, or your closest veterinary school.



  11. #11
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    Jul. 20, 2010
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    Texarkana, AR
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    I am old. I remember the great VEE scare of the 70's. I believe that a few horses near the Mexican border were diagnosed with the disease. There was a huge uproar about the disease spreading thoughout the south/southwest so all horses had to be vaccinated against the disease. At that time it was required. It was quite an operation, hunting down all the horses in the area and then rounding them up for vaccination. After they were vaccinated, the owners got a certificate and a small metal tag was crimped into the mane. A few of my high school buddies had nice summer jobs helping the local vet vaccinate.



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by wireweiners View Post
    I am old. I remember the great VEE scare of the 70's. I believe that a few horses near the Mexican border were diagnosed with the disease. There was a huge uproar about the disease spreading thoughout the south/southwest so all horses had to be vaccinated against the disease. At that time it was required. It was quite an operation, hunting down all the horses in the area and then rounding them up for vaccination. After they were vaccinated, the owners got a certificate and a small metal tag was crimped into the mane. A few of my high school buddies had nice summer jobs helping the local vet vaccinate.
    Yeah - The vaccines and then the Coggins test. Some people tried to hide their horses because postitive horses were immediately euth'd - Federally mandated, no recourse. One person had most or all of their wonderful QH breeding stock euth'd and quit the horse life/business. Rather informative time for a teen I learned how ham-handed and single-minded the Fed Gov't can be.

    Some years later people were given the option to brand the horse as positive and maintain the horse in isolation. Don't know if this is still allowed though.
    "Never do anything that you have to explain twice to the paramedics."
    Courtesy my cousin Tim



  13. #13
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    Jul. 20, 2010
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    Texarkana, AR
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fooler View Post
    Yeah - The vaccines and then the Coggins test. Some people tried to hide their horses because postitive horses were immediately euth'd - Federally mandated, no recourse. One person had most or all of their wonderful QH breeding stock euth'd and quit the horse life/business. Rather informative time for a teen I learned how ham-handed and single-minded the Fed Gov't can be.

    Some years later people were given the option to brand the horse as positive and maintain the horse in isolation. Don't know if this is still allowed though.
    Actually, there is no federal requirement for a Coggins test. The requirement or lack thereof is done on a state by state basis. I know that Arkansas requires annual Coggins tests but the law is rarely enforced. I believe they passed that law in the mid 90's. Prior to that, a horse only had to be tested if it changed ownership or was shipped to a show, race meeting or across state lines. There may be a federal requirement for a test for horses shipped in interstate commerce, I'm not sure.



  14. #14
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    Jun. 25, 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by wireweiners View Post
    Actually, there is no federal requirement for a Coggins test. The requirement or lack thereof is done on a state by state basis. I know that Arkansas requires annual Coggins tests but the law is rarely enforced. I believe they passed that law in the mid 90's. Prior to that, a horse only had to be tested if it changed ownership or was shipped to a show, race meeting or across state lines. There may be a federal requirement for a test for horses shipped in interstate commerce, I'm not sure.
    This was long ago, 1970/1971. IIRC - we were told it was a government mandate, I understood it to be federal. A vet was assigned to our area to test and vaccinate horses. We were advised that all horses had to be tested and vaccinated.
    The vet could amd did enlist sheriff or state patrol assistance to enter farms as necessary.
    Many horses were destroyed in those first years. True the horses were ill needed to put out of their misery as there was not viable treatment. However many 'healthy' horses were put down as they were considered carriers. Until it was discovered that many of the Positive Coggins tests were false positives. Most of the vets I knew would pull 3-4 tests before accepting a positive.
    This was over a 10-15 year period in AL/GA.

    After that we were 'encouraged' by our vets to continue with the vaccines. Again IIRC all southern tier states required a 6 or 12 month Coggins to trailer off property and definitely to cross state lines. Travel to FL required an health inspection in addition to the current Coggins, last I saw was 6 month.

    Vaccines are often region specific. As in my vet always checks if I am traveling in the Potomic Valley area. If no - then no PHF vaccine.
    "Never do anything that you have to explain twice to the paramedics."
    Courtesy my cousin Tim



  15. #15
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    Jul. 10, 2003
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    Default

    FWIW, a lot of vaccine reactions are due to the "other" stuff in the dose besides the antigen, like the carrier and adjuvant. If you have a particular WEE/EEE vaccine that this horse tolerates well, I would feel pretty comfortable giving the VEE added version. Pre-dosing with an anti-inflammatory is something to discuss with your vet to help mitigate overzealous reactions.
    The encephalitis and tetanus (not WNV added) seem to have a pretty low rate of adverse reactions. I see the most bad reactions with rhino, then some of the WNV, and sometimes strangles.
    *CrowneDragon*
    As Peter, Paul, and Mary say, a dragon lives forever.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
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    Jan. 21, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simkie View Post
    "Required"? Are there ANY "required" vaccines for horses? Recommended, sure...

    Morganpony, I'd got with whatever your vet recommends for your particular horse with his hisotry of vaccine reactions, or your closest veterinary school.
    Yeah, "required" was the wrong word. I suppose "strongly recommended" vs simply "only if you want to".

    And that is what is prompting this thread; multiple vets (from both substantial private practices in the area and the local vet school) telling me everything from "ALWAYS vaccinate for VEE" to "I have never vaccinated a horse for VEE".

    Quote Originally Posted by CrowneDragon View Post
    FWIW, a lot of vaccine reactions are due to the "other" stuff in the dose besides the antigen, like the carrier and adjuvant. If you have a particular WEE/EEE vaccine that this horse tolerates well, I would feel pretty comfortable giving the VEE added version. Pre-dosing with an anti-inflammatory is something to discuss with your vet to help mitigate overzealous reactions.
    The encephalitis and tetanus (not WNV added) seem to have a pretty low rate of adverse reactions. I see the most bad reactions with rhino, then some of the WNV, and sometimes strangles.
    Right, I found my usual E/W/T combo shot does have another version with VEE included. Since it's a killed virus, I do feel better about it, since he reacted violently to the live-attenuated rhino but had no history of reacting to the killed rhino. That being said, it was violent enough that both me & his vets (it happened twice, two different vets from same practice responded) were significantly traumatized and they told me to drop him down to the bare minimum vaccines. He's also 27, so his age is a consideration as well.

    I just posted to kind of see what others in the area do, kind of get a consensus or see if it is really split.



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