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  1. #221
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    Feb. 15, 2013
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    Wrong. It was rubber.

    It was wet because he knocked the water bucket over. Said bucket was then removed and horse was moved to a different stall in case he slipped in the wet rubber.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #222
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    Jun. 1, 2002
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    Indiana
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    Since you were there, can you tell me if you thought the horse was in danger at any time? Even if it was rubber, did you feel like he was in danger of flipping over in the crossties and seriously injuring himself? Can you explain why putting him in crossties to deal with his anxiety was the best method?


    9 members found this post helpful.

  3. #223
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    May. 17, 2010
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    Where humidity isn't just a word, it's a way of life.
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    Quote Originally Posted by lulu27 View Post
    Cement? It was a rubber floor.
    Lol! Lots of personal knowledge for a non-houseguest.

    I hope you or your friend heal quickly and easily, and I hope that you/she really spend some time learning how to read a horse's body language. I thihnk you will be amazed at how much easier things will be when you get a good grasp of that.


    15 members found this post helpful.

  4. #224
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    Feb. 15, 2013
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    Nope, wasn't there

    But then again, neither were any of you lot. So I guess only one person knows the truth.

    (also, humor me here, since I'm a n00b and all, but what is a "houseguest"?)



  5. #225
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    Nov. 13, 2009
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    4,546

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    Quote Originally Posted by lulu27 View Post
    Wrong. It was rubber.

    It was wet because he knocked the water bucket over. Said bucket was then removed and horse was moved to a different stall in case he slipped in the wet rubber.
    Oh boy. Well, see, even if it WAS rubber (which it sure did not appear to be in the video), the cement floor was only part of the problem with that video. Other problems include:

    It's freaking dangerous to leave a horse to rear like that in the cross ties, even if the stall was made of pillows. The horse nearly got its hooves over the top of the stall several times and nearly flipped over several times.

    And what the heck was a water bucket doing in there anyway during all of this? If you are going to leave a horse to rear repeatedly in a stall cross tied, at least remove SOME of the hazards!


    17 members found this post helpful.

  6. #226
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2004
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    Left coast, left wing, left field
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    6,231

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    Lulu, I saw the horse slip and nearly fall over. So it doesn't really matter if it was rubber or concrete or baby's tears. It was a bad situation with no release/reward/LEARNING for the horse.

    And it could have ended really badly. 90% of being a sensible horse person is choosing the path least likely to end in disaster. That's not a button I really see being selected too often by Dom.
    Arrange whatever pieces come your way. - Virginia Woolf

    Did you know that if you say the word "GULLIBLE" really softly, it sounds like "ORANGES"?


    18 members found this post helpful.

  7. #227
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    Nov. 13, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by lulu27 View Post
    Nope, wasn't there

    But then again, neither were any of you lot. So I guess only one person knows the truth.
    Actually, that's the thing with video. A LOT of people watched the video and can see the truth from that. Cement or no cement, there was nothing safe about what went on in that video.

    And it sure did look like cement. I'm pretty familiar with what cement looks like.


    15 members found this post helpful.

  8. #228
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    Jun. 15, 2002
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    5,929

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    Truthfully I am surprised it took her this long to break her leg. I mean lunging with the lunge line on the ground is just asking for it. I couldn't get over that fact.


    12 members found this post helpful.

  9. #229
    Join Date
    Oct. 31, 2011
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    35

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    So, you have a horse who is herd bound. So you should just.. Never.. touch it. Leave it always with its buddies, yeah.

    And also, if a horse is rearing in ties, you should run over and try to maybe put yourself under it in an attempt to free it. Although, pretty sure that's the duty of quick release ties.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #230
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    Jun. 1, 2002
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    Indiana
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    Who said you should just leave the horse in its field? Or that you should put yourself in danger after you realize you've made a mistake?


    2 members found this post helpful.

  11. #231
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    Feb. 15, 2013
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    13

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    You know what they say about assumptions?

    They make an ... out of you and me

    (Lol, I love the fact that it's turned into arguing about the material the floor is made from. I would find the whole thing hilarious apart from the fact that it's a bunch of keyboard warriors defaming a complete stranger on 'teh internetz'. Thats not funny. Thats sad.)



  12. #232
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    Mar. 14, 2004
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    Left coast, left wing, left field
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    I don't know about anyone else but I'm not a keyboard warrior. I'm a COTH regular with years and YEARS of horse experience. And YOU?
    Arrange whatever pieces come your way. - Virginia Woolf

    Did you know that if you say the word "GULLIBLE" really softly, it sounds like "ORANGES"?


    11 members found this post helpful.

  13. #233
    Join Date
    May. 18, 2012
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    Through the Looking Glass
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    167

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    Quote Originally Posted by coldfields View Post
    So, you have a horse who is herd bound. So you should just.. Never.. touch it. Leave it always with its buddies, yeah.

    And also, if a horse is rearing in ties, you should run over and try to maybe put yourself under it in an attempt to free it. Although, pretty sure that's the duty of quick release ties.
    I have not seen anyone here posting that letting a herd bound horse remain herd bound is a good thing. They've merely pointed out that there are better ways to deal with it.

    And yes - although I try very hard to never put a horse in a dangerous position, I would try to help them if they were. Even if it meant putting myself in some danger. I absolutely would have taken the horse in question off those ties in the safest manner I could have accomplished it.
    "I'm not strange, weird, off, nor crazy. My reality is just different from yours."
    ~Lewis Carroll


    6 members found this post helpful.

  14. #234
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    Jun. 15, 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by coldfields View Post
    So, you have a horse who is herd bound. So you should just.. Never.. touch it. Leave it always with its buddies, yeah.

    And also, if a horse is rearing in ties, you should run over and try to maybe put yourself under it in an attempt to free it. Although, pretty sure that's the duty of quick release ties.
    My solution to my mare that likes to rear/break out of cross ties is to simply NOT crosstie her. I got her a tie blocker ring and she just single ties on that. I can and have left her on it while I did things around the barn. Where she stood nicely and fell asleep. I did try to rehab her with cross ties and took a year and went nice and slow and she was good for about a year on them. Then she had something startle her and she freaked out and sat down and pulled back. The snap broke hit her in the nose and she fell down. She got back up with blood gushing out of her nose. I haven't cross tied her since that day. She is just a horse that needs a release if she goes to pull back. Its not worth risking her life. She is fine in cross ties if there is a wall behind her, but not hall way cross ties. She will stand single tied to a wall all day though. I still use tie blocker ring with her as if she get the little give she needs then she stops pulling.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  15. #235
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    Feb. 15, 2013
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    13

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    Me? nearly 25 years in horses. I am not a COTH regular because I, y'know, like to do stuff with said horses.

    But whatever you say.

    Anyway, I'm out. It's been a fun little boredom killing excersize, but I've got horses to feed. Bye!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #236
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    NorthEast
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    24,490

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    The floor material matters in terms of safety for the horse.

    I saw the video. The floors are cement. It doesn't take an acoustic specialist to know that metal shoes make a thud on rubber and a clink on cement. Horse was clinking. Very obviously.


    Although I personally don't care either way about slamming the trainer. Just pointing out the obvious. I have no issues with tying and letting them figure it out, but it should be done after the area has been made as safe as possible for the horse to have a hissy fit in. That simply wasn't safe.

    For the record, bare rubber mats wouldn't be either. Nor would tying in a manner where the human can't reach the release knot easily. Nor would leaving a water bucket in there before tying the horse. All beginner mistakes. Not saying a beginner is a bad thing either. Everyone was at some point.

    I'm still trying to figure out how I became a Mongol. Ya know, given the option I might prefer being a Hun.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte


    11 members found this post helpful.

  17. #237
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    Oct. 31, 2011
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    35

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    Quote Originally Posted by JoZ View Post
    I don't know about anyone else but I'm not a keyboard warrior. I'm a COTH regular with years and YEARS of horse experience. And YOU?
    That could be Webster's dictionary definition of keyboard warrior


    4 members found this post helpful.

  18. #238
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2008
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    2,195

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    Lulu and Coldfields

    It is tragic that your friend was injured.

    The point that you are both missing is that there were some serious mistakes being made by your friend. Mistakes that could have resulted in an even greater tragedy.

    I think most people here are trying to point out that maybe it is time to re examine some of her training methods. Believe it or not, there are some very experienced posters on here that are giving some excellent advice. It wouldn't hurt to listen and think about it.

    If you spend all your time trying to convince others on how much you know, you stop learning. If you stay open minded to sometimes realizing that there is so much more to learn, you can become an excellent horseperson.

    But it takes time.

    Lots of time.


    21 members found this post helpful.

  19. #239
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2010
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    Earth
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    2,352

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    Quote Originally Posted by lulu27 View Post
    You know what they say about assumptions?

    They make an ... out of you and me

    (Lol, I love the fact that it's turned into arguing about the material the floor is made from. I would find the whole thing hilarious apart from the fact that it's a bunch of keyboard warriors defaming a complete stranger on 'teh internetz'. Thats not funny. Thats sad.)
    I believe you have misunderstood this argument. I don't know Dom from Adam's house cat, but I can determine from the videos which were posted along with her diatribe (blog), that she is inexperienced, ill-equipped, and a poor judge of both horse and human behavior. From all of this, I can very well determine she is not qualified to train horses, especially those who she refers to as "dangerous". I've met trainers like her in real life, and they also frightened me. However, that was absent of the internet as well as blogs, and rarely did trainers (even bad ones) present video evidence of their incompetency for others to offer their opinions.

    If you do not wish to believe me, or anyone else posting on this thread (or elsewhere), that is your choice. However, when you post a public blog, you invite criticism. If you do not appreciate the commentary don't post it, or better yet, don't do the thing itself!
    Horse sense is the thing a horse has which keeps it from betting on people.
    W. C. Fields


    16 members found this post helpful.

  20. #240
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2003
    Posts
    1,897

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    I do know Dom, and have known her to behave quite recklessly both with horses and otherwise. She's young, and I hope this unfortunate experience turns out to be the old "sometimes the worst thing that happens is the best thing." It will give her time to reflect on her "methods" and ability.


    13 members found this post helpful.

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