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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2007
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    Central NJ
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    1,062

    Default Sorry, my mistake

    Dang...........so sorry, never meant for attacks. MY BAD
    Last edited by skykingismybaby1; Feb. 13, 2013 at 03:20 PM.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 12, 2006
    Location
    Western South Dakota
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    2,473

    Default

    You know, really, life is too short! There are too many good horses in the world to deal with this kind.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 13, 2011
    Location
    East Longmeadow, MA
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    3,390

    Default

    Oh, so sorry for the trainer. And heartbroken about Willow. Pasos are my breed. My boy is very reactive (way less so now that he's older) and nervous (also less so now) and I keep telling him he's very lucky he ended up with me. He has taught me patience.
    What's wrong with you?? Your cheese done slid off its cracker?!?!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 8, 2011
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    414

    Default

    If your friend doesn't have experience with Pasos (and specifically with rehabbing problem Pasos) she needs to let this one go before she gets killed and I mean that literally. I looked at the video and I'd bet good money that mare has either Castellano or Capuchino lines and has not been started or managed properly. *Some* of the horses from that line are extremely sensitive, reactive and athletic and really should be in the hands of a professional Paso trainer from age 2-1/2 on up to avoid becoming this kind of monster. I had a young mare that I bought sight unseen from a "friend" of a "friend" (note quotes) a few years ago who had issues similar to this one and had both Castellano and Capuchino lines. She was gorgeous, well-bred and well-gaited, and I like horses with brio. The issues were not disclosed to us beforehand but the Paso community is small and after talking around we discovered that the person who started her damaged the horse mentally and physically and that the "friend" definitely knew this. Hubby is an extremely talented and stubborn Paso trainer. I'm a reasonably skilled and stubborn Paso rider. We both liked the mare a lot and were willing to take on the project. After two years of rehab involving chiropractors (thank you Dr Dill) and skilled and patient training we both had to admit defeat. Although we improved her and dealt with the chiro issues, the mare was simply beyond repair as a reliable saddle mount.

    Fixing this mare at this point will require a lot more than positive reinforcement and cookies and she will NOT EVER be suitable for an amateur rider with a bad back. There are plenty of other Pasos out there with the same look and gait and much better brains. Please tell your friend to do the smart and honorable thing to make sure this mare doesn't go back into the auction or get passed to someone else who doesn't know her background...


    10 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2007
    Location
    Central NJ
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    1,062

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BarbaricYawp View Post
    If your friend doesn't have experience with Pasos (and specifically with rehabbing problem Pasos) she needs to let this one go before she gets killed and I mean that literally. I looked at the video and I'd bet good money that mare has either Castellano or Capuchino lines and has not been started or managed properly. *Some* of the horses from that line are extremely sensitive, reactive and athletic and really should be in the hands of a professional Paso trainer from age 2-1/2 on up to avoid becoming this kind of monster. I had a young mare that I bought sight unseen from a "friend" of a "friend" (note quotes) a few years ago who had issues similar to this one and had both Castellano and Capuchino lines. She was gorgeous, well-bred and well-gaited, and I like horses with brio. The issues were not disclosed to us beforehand but the Paso community is small and after talking around we discovered that the person who started her damaged the horse mentally and physically and that the "friend" definitely knew this. Hubby is an extremely talented and stubborn Paso trainer. I'm a reasonably skilled and stubborn Paso rider. We both liked the mare a lot and were willing to take on the project. After two years of rehab involving chiropractors (thank you Dr Dill) and skilled and patient training we both had to admit defeat. Although we improved her and dealt with the chiro issues, the mare was simply beyond repair as a reliable saddle mount.

    Fixing this mare at this point will require a lot more than positive reinforcement and cookies and she will NOT EVER be suitable for an amateur rider with a bad back. There are plenty of other Pasos out there with the same look and gait and much better brains. Please tell your friend to do the smart and honorable thing to make sure this mare doesn't go back into the auction or get passed to someone else who doesn't know her background...
    Even without your specific knowledge of Paso lines, this young trainer has figured out that this horse is not right for the owners and never will be. The future of this horse has to be determined in the near future. She was pulled from Camelot once and I doubt any of the parties involved will dump her again for some one else to get hurt. IMHO PTS is the solution unless some one steps up.
    Last edited by skykingismybaby1; Feb. 13, 2013 at 11:29 AM. Reason: spelling


    4 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
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    Jul. 13, 2011
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    East Longmeadow, MA
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    Default

    I know. So sad. Poor mare. Broke my heart ot see how scared she was just standing there tacked up. Hope your friend as a full and speedy recovery. She sounds like a really great person.
    What's wrong with you?? Your cheese done slid off its cracker?!?!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 8, 2011
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    414

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by skykingismybaby1 View Post
    Even without your specific knowledge of Paso lines, this young trainer has figured out that this horse is not right for the owners and never will be. The future of this horse has to be determined in the near future. She was pulled from Camelot once and I doubt any of the parties involved will dump her agan for some one else to get hurt. IMHO PTS is the solution unless some one steps up/
    Common sense is a rare thing, glad to hear your friend has some. Agree with your recommendation.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 11, 2007
    Location
    Andover, MA
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    Default

    I've been following this blogger for years and she just has SUCH a good head for horses and is thoughtful about what she does. We started out badly (long story) but she quite graciously came back to me and apologized. It's very sad that this happened, especially when her training business was really getting going.

    I think her point about "two kinds of horses" at Camelot and other low-end auctions is worth repeating. I know of a couple of fancy show Morgans who came through New Holland -- including some with outstanding recent show records -- who have turned out to be absolutely crazy and dangerous. Of course, a skinny beat up horse might have behavioral problems... but the fat shiny ones have to make you pause and ask WHY they are at auction.
    You have to have experiences to gain experience.

    Proudly owned by Mythic Feronia, 1998 Morgan mare; G-dspeed Trump & Minnie; welcome 2014 Morgan filly MtnTop FlyWithMeJosephine


    7 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 10, 2010
    Location
    Western NY
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    Default

    This poor girl...so kind and insightful about the horse. And she has no medical insurance.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
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    Default

    Your poor friend. Geez.

    I know from reading on here that the minute you say "rear" you get a lot of negative responses, mostly of the not safe and never going to be safe variety. My trainer has a colt that she keeps saying she's going to sell off the farm because he flipped in the bitting rig. She's been saying this for months now and can't bring herself to do the deed.
    I feel so for the poor horse Willow, she doesn't know, she's just reacting, but at the same time that could have been your friend's life. Maybe it is time to either turn Willow into a permanent pasture pet, forever and ever, or have her PTS. I'd be wrestling with this as her owner, that's for sure.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2000
    Location
    Heaven - Rappahannock County, Virginia
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    Default

    the author seems like a lovely insightful trainer and horsewoman, who also happens to be an idiot. she is training horses for a living and she has no health insurance?!!! she could afford $80 winter riding breeches but she didn't opt for health insurance

    yes, sadly, this is definitely a cautionary tale...
    * trying hard to be the person that my horses think i am


    7 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2007
    Location
    Central NJ
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jacksmom View Post
    the author seems like a lovely insightful trainer and horsewoman, who also happens to be an idiot. she is training horses for a living and she has no health insurance?!!! she could afford $80 winter riding breeches but she didn't opt for health insurance

    yes, sadly, this is definitely a cautionary tale...
    Yes the risks taken in youth seem very different when viewed from my 60yo vantage point.

    Read the rest of the blog --- lots of laughs and good writing, and great photography.
    Last edited by skykingismybaby1; Feb. 13, 2013 at 01:46 PM. Reason: spelling



  13. #13
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    Oct. 11, 2007
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    Default

    Of course the lack of insurance bothers me too but I will not judge her for it when there are so many horsepeople who go without it.
    You have to have experiences to gain experience.

    Proudly owned by Mythic Feronia, 1998 Morgan mare; G-dspeed Trump & Minnie; welcome 2014 Morgan filly MtnTop FlyWithMeJosephine


    3 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 2005
    Location
    Strasburg, PA "Just west of Paradise"
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    3,969

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jacksmom View Post
    the author seems like a lovely insightful trainer and horsewoman, who also happens to be an idiot. she is training horses for a living and she has no health insurance?!!! she could afford $80 winter riding breeches but she didn't opt for health insurance

    yes, sadly, this is definitely a cautionary tale...

    YES!



  15. #15
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    Jul. 13, 2011
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    East Longmeadow, MA
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    Default

    Unfortunately, lots and lots of people in this country cannot afford health insurance. Those of it who have it as a benefit from our employers can count ourselves lucky.
    What's wrong with you?? Your cheese done slid off its cracker?!?!


    16 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct. 11, 2006
    Posts
    1,707

    Default

    Wow. I read the whole tale. Im so glad she had a helmet on. Her assessment of those at Camelot was great. I think that people tend to forget (not the blogger) that these horses are at an AUCTION. They are ALL there for a reason. She summed it up well, so I won't repeat. I pulled my horse from the #10 feedlot at Camelot in 2010 and while he was NOTHING like this horse, he was not easy. The average person is not going to have a Snowman story about their horse pulled from the Auction. You really need to not only be aware and capable, but have a support system that can help you if it's more than you can do on your own. It seems like a fairy tale idea to 'rescue' a horse from camelot, but so many times, we see them get bought, only to come back through again because they were unsuitable for their buyer.

    This young trainer has a great head on her shoulders and I commend her for trying with this horse.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    5,283

    Default

    I agree -- I have discovered how relatively lucky (although I sure don't feel lucky, it's far from free) I am to have insurance and how quickly you can find yourself in a very serious place. I have a very physical job and a very physical hobby. Knee injury, surgery, PT, medications, MRI's, xrays, etc later, it is an ENORMOUS amount of money and I am still not done with it after almost 2 years. It would be several orders of magnitude higher without insurance. And I am still left with an unfixable injury and piles of bills.

    Dom is a kind and thoughtful person but it is an important point that you need to think very VERY carefully about putting yourself at risk and what the consequences will be. We often learn this lesson too late; I cringed reading, seeing only dollar signs fly by at each procedure. It really can wipe you out in the blink of an eye, especially if you have no backup (significant savings, family, lottery tickets, etc), and even a relatively "simple" thing as a broken leg can be financially devastating.

    ETA -- also consider that the rules are changing. Due the strain of treating uninsured patients (and many trainers fall into this category), you may show up at the hospital, have a splint strapped on and be shown the door if you cannot provide an insurance card. No surgical care, no expensive medications, etc, so you may be risking more than you think.

    I know very few people who spend their time with horses who have NOT been significantly injured in some way at some time. Dealing with them is always a package of uncertainty and we all know it happens despite our best intentions, in the of a heartbeat.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
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    May. 6, 2007
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    Napanee ON
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    4,123

    Default

    I hope you asked her if you could post this here....nothing like getting torn apart on Coth to brighten your day! Not meaning anyone is doing that yet...


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
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    Apr. 17, 2002
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    between the barn and the pond
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    14,388

    Default

    I read that with dread and an impending taste of copper in my mouth.

    I had (for me) a spectacularly bad wreck involving an abused and mistreated young molly mule, out of a Paso/TWH mare (Hot and twitchy and fizzy). I didn't know her history and very nearly got slammed face first into a 4X4 post when she panicked, bolted, and ducked when she got to the fence. My helmet was irrelevant. Severe whiplash, lost confidence, and a trashed hamstring later, I was able to count myself very, very, very lucky. I slid down and hit the dirt right beside that damn post. Just right there.

    The owner now has her turned out. Only she can safely ride the molly. I pray she never, ever, never considers that molly for sale again, but I'm not so sure it won't happen. She's pretty, and quick, and looks like she'd be a good one, and my wreck killed a very pretty check that was on hold to buy her. It took no less than five mule 'experts' to convince her she may never be safe for another rider. How much you wanna bet that the memory will fade? Some animals cannot be brought back from their first taste of 'riding'. They are too damaged.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2009
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    4,573

    Default

    Hmm. I dunno. I guess I agree that this horse doesn't seem like she will ever be suitable as a riding horse. She should probably either be a pasture pet or humanely euthanized.

    That said, when I was 14, a school horse that I knew well (and who was well within my ability level - I owned my own horse and showed in the 3 ft hunters at the time) reared and flipped on me at the mounting block and broke my femur.

    So it's not always the "troubled" ones that end up hurting you. If anything, I think we are all more careful around horses that we know we can't trust 100%.

    Riding is a risk, period. Stuff happens.

    That's why it is crazy to be riding when you don't have insurance, but I'm sure the blog's author realizes this now.


    4 members found this post helpful.

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