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  1. #1
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    Default Would you ask the BO?

    If you mostly like a barn but 1-2 things really keep you from wanting to stay or move to it would you ask the BO if that 1-2 things could be changed? Not safety or horse care related.

    This is a real life story.
    “Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.” Peter Drucker



  2. #2
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    Apr. 14, 2001
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    Depends on the things

    And also how well I know the BO, and what sort of relationship is there!


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  3. #3
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    This isnt it but lets say the outdoor ring is closed from Nov-April & the only other place to ride is the aisleway, Im talking barn rules more than anything.
    The BO & I are on good terms both business & personal.
    “Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.” Peter Drucker



  4. #4
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    Jun. 24, 2006
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    Default

    I would ask... what have you got to lose? Just explain how you are feeling.


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  5. #5
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    Jul. 15, 2003
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    Default

    It never hurts to ask, the worst he or she can say is "no" and as a BO, I would rather have a boarder ask than simply give notice and then tell me why, especially if it is something that I could have done for them.
    Every man has a right to his opinion, but no man has a right to be wrong in his facts.
    Bernard M. Baruch



  6. #6
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    Apr. 14, 2007
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    Default

    yes have a calm discussion. What have you got to lose?



  7. #7
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    Sep. 11, 2011
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    Default

    Definitely bring it up in a non-defensive, non-accusatory tone. If it's merely a conversation and the two of you have a good relationship, it shouldn't turn sour. If you don't say anything, chances are those 1-2 little things are going to bother you more and more and then the really little things are going to start to bother you too. Open communication is incredibly important.
    "No hour of life is wasted that is spent in the saddle" - Winston Churchill

    Check out Central Virginia Horse Rescue



  8. #8
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    Jun. 28, 2003
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    Default

    You can ask, but my experience in 40+ years of boarding is that asking a barn owner to change their ways of doing things does not usually go well. You need to look for a place that has a similar style of caretaking.

    You could talk to them about why the ring is closed, but I'm, guessing they are protecting the ring footing. It is possible that there could be a reassessment of when the ring really needs protecting (like after wet weather etc.) which is worth talking about

    I wouldn't call the ring situation a little thing though. If my main riding was in the ring, it's closed for 5 months of the year and there isn't any other realistic place to ride, it would be a BIG problem for me.
    Last edited by Drive NJ; Feb. 13, 2013 at 09:32 AM.


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  9. #9
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    Default

    My rule on this kind of thing is that I will always ask, but also always be willing to accept whatever answer I get. If the answer is no, I accept the answer and either move on to a different barn or stay at the current barn under the current conditions, depending on how important the issue was to me.

    What you don't want to do is ask for something to be changed and then get sour and throw a fit if your request is not honored. All you can do is ask a question and get an answer. Then YOU decide what you do in response to the answer.

    That said, if the things you want changed are major things that are part of the BO's overall philosophy, you are unlikely to find a solution you are pleased with. The most common areas that you are unlikely to get changed are turnout and feeding.



  10. #10
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    Default

    If the ring is closed all winter months I wouldn't have boarded there in the first place, but thats just my opinion and of course it depends what your priorities are as a horse owner. Some people don't need to ride all year round, but I'm not one of those people. If I'm paying for a horse, barring injuries/extenuating circumstances I expect to be able to ride!

    If your "changes" are as significant as this one, I doubt the BO will be willing to adhere to them. However, if you feel you can approach the conversation in an adult manner it can't hurt to ask. Next time you choose a barn I'd be sure to consider all aspects of the facility & how they relate to your needs. Not everything will be perfect, because nothing ever is, but your main needs should be there.
    Last edited by Event4Life; Feb. 14, 2013 at 07:17 AM. Reason: grammar mistake!
    "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
    "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey



  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drive NJ View Post
    You can ask, but my experience in 40+ years of boarding is that asking a barn owner to change their ways of doing things does not usually go well. You need to look for a place that has a similar style of caretaking.

    You could talk to them about why the ring is closed, but I'm, guessing they are protecting the ring footing. It is possible that there could be a reassessment of when the ring really needs protecting (like after wet weather etc.) which is worth talking about

    I wouldn't call the ring situation a little thing though. If my main riding was in the ring, it's closed for 5 months of the year and there isn't any other realistic place to ride, it would be a BIG problem for me.
    Sometimes rules are made after t e horse is moved but I am also looking around if the talk doesnt go well, Im thinking if I bring it up & they still say no its like a red flag that Im leaving. I dont want to get a rep as someone who moves around alot but that would be what Im doing if I go, & the horse world here is REALLY small.
    “Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.” Peter Drucker



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2001
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    Finally...back in civilization, more or less
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    Default

    Sometimes it is difficult to find the right "fit" in a boarding situation. There are simply things you cannot know until you've been somewhere for a while, or like you say, a situation that worked well originally can change over time and become less satisfactory. While I understand the concern about moving around a lot... I think sometimes that is just what happens until you find the right place.
    **********
    We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
    -PaulaEdwina


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  13. #13
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lucassb View Post
    Sometimes it is difficult to find the right "fit" in a boarding situation. There are simply things you cannot know until you've been somewhere for a while, or like you say, a situation that worked well originally can change over time and become less satisfactory. While I understand the concern about moving around a lot... I think sometimes that is just what happens until you find the right place.
    I agree with this. I spent a really long time boarding at one place through my junior years, but as an adult, I have moved around quite a bit with my current horse. He's a management challenge, and I'm particular. It wasn't easy for us to find the right fit (fingers crossed, things are going very well where we are now). In four years, I have boarded him in four barns (one for over two years, two for less than a year each, and my current one just under a year).

    Our horse community is also very small, and I know nearly everyone in it. I have been told that I do not have a bad reputation regarding the moves (it is something I also worried about). People are aware of the circumstances and reasons for each move, my vets at a very well known clinic can vouch for me, etc. I'm pretty positive I'm not blacklisted.

    If you are a straightforward and honest person who doesn't stir up crazy drama, people will like you and you will be welcome in most barns. Regarding the drama bit - if you speak to the barn owner about your concerns, make sure that is the ONLY person you talk to about those concerns. Don't be a pot-stirrer.



  14. #14
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    Jan. 29, 2013
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    Greensboro, NC
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    Default

    it can't hurt to ask, especially if you're on good terms with the BO already. Maybe ask why such rules are in place - perhaps they got burned before and don't want it to happen again.



  15. #15
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    Default

    Discuss, but be careful not to word it in terms of "I have a problem with you." Make it sound more, "We have a problem with this." No one wants to lose clients; so if she can or wants to accommodate you, she will. If she can't/won't, just give notice kindly and say, "I'm sorry, but I just need to find a better fit." That's how not to burn your bridge. . .



  16. #16
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    Jun. 28, 2003
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    We've found over the years that you find a good place and stay for a long time. If things change and it no longer fits, or it closes, or whatever, it's time to look again - and you usually let things go a bit longer than you 'should'.

    Then there is the transition period finding the next right place and here you may barn 'hop' for a bit until you find a place that fits. As stated you often don't know all about the new place until you are on site.

    As you said you have a good rep in the area, moving to find the right place will usually not change that.

    Where it becomes an issue is if you move a lot and bad mouth the other places. To us we just look at it as "a bad fit" regardless of what the issue is.



  17. #17
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    Dec. 10, 2012
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    Default

    By all means ask but have an exit strategy already mapped out and planned.

    I'm one who would not consider staying at a place that has a blanket closure of the outdoor arena for half the year.




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