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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2013
    Posts
    18

    Question Turning out horses problem

    I am a Co-op student that is working a boarding stable that has like 50 horses. One of my problems that I want to ask is...

    Each pasture is organized by sex and attitude. I have to bring in two horse for the farrier, One is a gelding that sorta has a an attitude of him stepping all on you. He is also with a group of geldings that...don't hate but have a major pecking order. There is this one horse that was i assumed the boss because he would shoo the other horses away in an aggressive manner. Just today, I was not warned and went to turnout out the gelding that i am bringing in tomorrow. I opened the gate, brought the horse in, and with in minutes the bossy horse started to attack my horses rump and he went buzzerk! I got chucked into the gate and I just un clipped the lead and shut the gate closed. I could have gotten seriously hurt. I am going to ask for help tomorrow but there is going to be a day where everyone will be busy and one of the horses will be needed to be brought out or in from that pasture. What can I do to prevent me from getting seriously injured on the job?

    Now, the other horse is just with an annoying little pony that i can take care of so that will be the first to be brought in for the farrier.

    And another thing, some of the mares in the other paddock....I was just informed today to watch out for a mare with a great big attitude that I am a post to lunge some days. She is a pain in the butt and i have the same problem with keeping her away from the other horses, what can i do?

    Thank you so much



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2006
    Location
    Port Perry Ontario - formerly Prodomus
    Posts
    2,364

    Default

    if you have time bring in the agressive horse first, get the one you need and then afterwards put the agressive one out again.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 12, 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,649

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ClydesdaleLover View Post
    I am a Co-op student that is working a boarding stable that has like 50 horses. One of my problems that I want to ask is...

    Each pasture is organized by sex and attitude. I have to bring in two horse for the farrier, One is a gelding that sorta has a an attitude of him stepping all on you. He is also with a group of geldings that...don't hate but have a major pecking order. There is this one horse that was i assumed the boss because he would shoo the other horses away in an aggressive manner. Just today, I was not warned and went to turnout out the gelding that i am bringing in tomorrow. I opened the gate, brought the horse in, and with in minutes the bossy horse started to attack my horses rump and he went buzzerk! I got chucked into the gate and I just un clipped the lead and shut the gate closed. I could have gotten seriously hurt. I am going to ask for help tomorrow but there is going to be a day where everyone will be busy and one of the horses will be needed to be brought out or in from that pasture. What can I do to prevent me from getting seriously injured on the job?

    Now, the other horse is just with an annoying little pony that i can take care of so that will be the first to be brought in for the farrier.

    And another thing, some of the mares in the other paddock....I was just informed today to watch out for a mare with a great big attitude that I am a post to lunge some days. She is a pain in the butt and i have the same problem with keeping her away from the other horses, what can i do?

    Thank you so much


    This is kind of basic horse handling stuff, so you should really ask someone to walk you through stuff since you seem inexperienced, and you're right, stuff can happen so quickly and you don't want to get hurt.

    For now, go out with a lunge whip, to keep horses away from the ones you're handling. Don't be afraid to mention that you feel unsafe, and someone else needs to take over the job.

    Did you mis-type, or is it really taking you "minutes" to let a horse loose? ("within minutes the boss horse was attacking your horse")


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2013
    Posts
    18

    Default

    [QUOTE=

    Did you mis-type, or is it really taking you "minutes" to let a horse loose? ("within minutes the boss horse was attacking your horse")[/QUOTE]

    No sorry, I guess explained that wrong. What I meant to say was, The moment I got me and the horse in the pasture, the bully horse came running over and was biting the horse i had, and was pinning his ears back.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 22, 2007
    Location
    South of Georgia, North of Miami
    Posts
    1,117

    Default

    My horses learned early on they were not to rush the gate and if I had one of their pasture mates in hand they were to STAY BACK. Just because the gate was opened was not an invitation to exit.

    Bring a dressage whip with you. It's long enough to keep the others back without being so long it's hard to handle which can be a problem sometimes with a lunge whip (and I'm not the most coordinated person which doesn't help LOL). Do not be afraid to give anybody who gets close a good whack on the chest. Mean business and do not open the gate if you are being crowded. That's a recipe for disaster. Just keep making them back off. Once you get through the gate you can lengthen the lead line so if the horse you have needs to back away he can without pulling your arm out of the socket. It won't take the herd long to realize you are not to be messed with - horses are smart like that.

    Hopefully the farrier isn't coming at dinner time. If he is it wouldn't hurt to get the horses you need earlier so the feeding time pecking order doesn't get in the way and make your life harder.

    Good luck and stay safe above everything.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2013
    Posts
    18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Saidapal View Post
    My horses learned early on they were not to rush the gate and if I had one of their pasture mates in hand they were to STAY BACK. Just because the gate was opened was not an invitation to exit.

    Bring a dressage whip with you. It's long enough to keep the others back without being so long it's hard to handle which can be a problem sometimes with a lunge whip (and I'm not the most coordinated person which doesn't help LOL). Do not be afraid to give anybody who gets close a good whack on the chest. Mean business and do not open the gate if you are being crowded. That's a recipe for disaster. Just keep making them back off. Once you get through the gate you can lengthen the lead line so if the horse you have needs to back away he can without pulling your arm out of the socket. It won't take the herd long to realize you are not to be messed with - horses are smart like that.

    Hopefully the farrier isn't coming at dinner time. If he is it wouldn't hurt to get the horses you need earlier so the feeding time pecking order doesn't get in the way and make your life harder.

    Good luck and stay safe above everything.
    Thank you so much Saidapal! And the farrier is coming early in the morning.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 28, 2009
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    1,737

    Default

    I second the dressage whip. But you need to be hyer aware of the location of horses in the field and send the aggressor away before he has a chance to nip, kick at the horse you are handling. I would use the whip and a VERY ANGRY VOICE. It won't take too many times of using the VERY ANGRY VOICE with the whip and then you'll only need your voice.

    Good luck and be safe.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2006
    Location
    Central Illinois
    Posts
    875

    Default

    I agree, is just basic horse handling. When I go to the pasture, I am in charge. The gate belongs to ME. I am good w/a lead rope, but you may wanna take a lunge whip.

    NO horses are allowed by the gate when I go in or out. If I am taking a horse out, and another horse gets in your way, you need to leave your horse and chase the other other away.

    You are the one in charge, if you are consistant, the horses will respect your space.

    Giving a firm whack is fine. All I have to do is growl "get back" and they do. If they dont, I will make them MOVE their feet.

    It comes down to the basics. YOUR space is YOURS, PERIOD!

    If you ask a horse to move,if he doesnt, MAKE him move his feet until he does what you ask. Do not pester, but mean what you ask. It is all based in respect.

    Be fair, do not be afraid of being firm, and be consistant are the best ways to gain the horses respect.

    Good luck!
    Riding is NOT meant as an inside sport, GET out of that arena!!!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2013
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    500

    Default

    if you are still uncomfortable with the situation, take a more experienced horse person with you to help out and show you what to do - horses know who they can get away with stuff with and they will take advantage of that.



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