The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 39
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep. 8, 2006
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    5,690

    Question Help! OTTB being very bad! UPDATE post 39

    Really hoping someone has an idea, because I have no idea.

    OTTB gelding, 13 this year. I have had him since late November 2011. Been at current facility since August 2012. Started acting up November/December 2012.

    He's turned out all day every day, except in extreme weather. Out with one other horse. They're attached, but nothing to explain his behavior.

    The problem is bringing him in at night. Some days he's perfect, other days he's terrible. He'll rear and strike at the person bringing him in. There doesn't seem to be any predictor of the behavior.

    Grain: He had been on ~1.5 pounds Ultium twice a day. Recently upped to ~3 pounds twice a day.

    Hay: AM gets 3/4 flakes of average hay (timothy?). PM he had been getting 4 flakes. Due to hay shortage now on 2 flakes + several pounds soaked alfalfa cubes (this has been for maybe a week now).

    Work: Hasn't done much in the past few weeks, now that it's getting warmer will try to work him 4-5 times a week.

    I've had almost no problem bringing him in. There have been a couple nights where the BO let me know he was being bad and I'd have to bring him in myself, both times he behaved fine. (If he's being bad, both he and his turnout friend stay out.)

    We've tried bringing him in first, using a chain, not using a chain... nothing seems to crack this behavior. He is worse with the chain. Use of the chain gets him worked up so he runs backward and generally gets nutty... which makes no sense to me, because he was on the track from ages 2-11.

    He's been on SmartCalm Ultra for over a month. I think he's been decent for a while and only recently got really bad. I am going to suggest we try taking him off the alfalfa and see if that makes a difference.

    The people who handle him are all experienced, competent horsepeople. It's possible people are a little nervous after seeing how bad he can be and he's feeding off that, but I can't blame anyone for being edgy after he's reared and struck out.

    We're at a loss of what to do with him. He's fine for most handling, it's just bringing him in that he's a problem.


    Any ideas?
    Last edited by amastrike; Sep. 4, 2013 at 11:36 AM.
    Against My Better Judgement: A blog about my new FLF OTTB
    Do not buy a Volkswagen. I did and I regret it.
    VW sucks.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,663

    Default

    I can think of three ideas... his grain was recently doubled, he was switched to a much hotter source of forage, and he hasn't been in as much work as he's used to.
    Try to break down crushing defeats into smaller, more manageable failures. It’s also helpful every now and then to stop, take stock of your situation, and really beat yourself up about it.The Onion


    11 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 8, 2006
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    5,690

    Default

    HH, this has been going on longer than any of those things. It's been going on since November or December. Grain change has been maybe two weeks, forage a week, work a few weeks. Had the behavior started in the past few weeks, then I'd point the finger at those things immediately, but it's been happening for several months.
    Against My Better Judgement: A blog about my new FLF OTTB
    Do not buy a Volkswagen. I did and I regret it.
    VW sucks.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2004
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    3,192

    Default

    I second all of what HungarianHippo said, but in addition, if he's being bad with a chain all of a sudden, someone used it improperly and hurt him and he's being defensive. If he's fine for you and bad for some of the employees, it's likely the people and the way they are handling.

    He's out of work, his grain doubled, and he's getting lots of alfalfa. He's got loads of energy in his system and any added stress will cause an explosion. I'd cut the grain back, and add some rice bran if you're having weight issues, which I'm assuming is why his grain doubled suddenly. That's a lot of grain for any horse, let alone a TB out of work.
    Strong promoter of READING the entire post before responding.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2004
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    3,192

    Default

    Just read your update. I go back to my part about someone treating him poorly. Try to narrow down who in particular he is having this issue with. If he's not doing it to you... and not doing it everytime to everyone, I'd evaluate WHO is handling him.

    I had a TB mare that would get jiggy on the lead line on the way in and out. We had one employee at the boarding facility that put the chain over her nose, incorrectly, and decided to discipline her... they were never able to lead her out again. She'd explode everytime. Anyone else could take her in and out without an issue.
    Strong promoter of READING the entire post before responding.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 18, 2010
    Location
    Aubrey, Texas
    Posts
    218

    Default

    Also - if he's bad, he gets to stay out with his friend? Seems like full incentive to me!

    Cut the rich foods, try to get him into more work if at all possible (can you lunge him a couple of nights a week, at least?), and insist that he behave.
    Veni vidi vici. With a paint pony, nonetheless.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2009
    Posts
    4,630

    Default

    My money is on all of the feed changes, new-ish facility, plus something with the handling.

    My horse (also a TB) is very sensitive to ANY nervousness on the part of his handler. He can just smell it on people or something. Anyway, only certain people can bring him in and out, get him dressed for turnout, etc. It's not always the most experienced people that handle him the best, either (although experienced CONFIDENT people do great with him). An inexperienced, but unafraid person can usually also handle him well.

    If he senses fear, he acts like a huge prick. Rears, strikes, tries to push into his handler with his shoulder, sometimes tries to bite. It's pretty terrible. If handled confidently, he will walk in like a trail nag with his head low and appropriately next to the person leading him.

    I've done a TON of ground work with him and could basically compete in a "showmanship" type division with him if I wanted to. He walks, stops, backs, turns, and trots in hand very, very well. He knows how to behave properly, but he requires the right person to handle him.

    Your horse might be the same.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    17,643

    Default

    My mare did this for a time. It got bad enough that the barn refused to bring her in and I had to go out and do it. I never had problems with her.

    It was purely handling errors from the barn staff. Corrections at the wrong time at the wrong intensity. I handled her for a few weeks correctly and then the barn could bring her in with no troubles.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep. 8, 2006
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    5,690

    Default

    The last few weeks have been bitterly cold, now it's warming up I'll make sure he gets worked as much as I can.

    BO and I are texting trying to figure out a plan.. We're going to try cutting back the Ultium, adding Amplify (a high fat supplement), and doing either regular hay or timothy/alfalfa cubes at dinner. If that doesn't help, take him out back and shoot him. (Kidding! Mostly....)

    I do wonder how other people handle him.. I always go in with a relaxed but no-nonsense attitude. I expect him to behave and I'm not bracing for a tantrum. If he does start to get snotty, I give the lead line a couple tugs, tell him to stop being a jerk, and carry on.

    Staying out with his friend isn't an incentive, he WANTS to come in, he just gets too excited about it.

    It's just weird because he was there for a good 3 months before he started being bad.
    Against My Better Judgement: A blog about my new FLF OTTB
    Do not buy a Volkswagen. I did and I regret it.
    VW sucks.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,663

    Default

    Got it. The timing of the behavior vs other changes wasn't clear. Still think all those recent changes are counterproductive, though. The other theory is that with the bad weather, they simply don't move around as much in turnout. They're often mincing around on uneven frozen or slippery ground, or parked by the hay feeder more than usual. My guys are out 24/7 but around this time of year they do get a lot of pent up energy because they don't get to do the gallop-buck-fart routine that they routinely do when the ground is more comfortable to run on. Can you give him 10-15 min a day at liberty in an indoor ring, just to let him be silly?
    Try to break down crushing defeats into smaller, more manageable failures. It’s also helpful every now and then to stop, take stock of your situation, and really beat yourself up about it.The Onion


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec. 12, 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    7,105

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by amastrike View Post

    Staying out with his friend isn't an incentive, he WANTS to come in, he just gets too excited about it.

    It's just weird because he was there for a good 3 months before he started being bad.
    It is the time of year for them to be sh!ts. Bad footing, cool weather, lack of work....all bad things for a TB!

    Just off the top of my head...has the turnout order changed? Is he being left for last (because of a change or because of his recent jerk behavior) instead of his usual first in position?



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2007
    Location
    NY State
    Posts
    363

    Default

    A couple of things you might try (along with what's already been posted);
    You might try to be THE one that brings him in for a while. When you start to bring him in, practice halting along the way, and making him stand a moment before he gets to his barn/stall. OTTBs often have the habit of "taking you there", rather than going with you or following you there. Folks that aren't used to these guys can get bullied around and intimidated by this. I tend to let mine be in a forward mindset while I'm leading them, but I realize that this would make them difficult for others to handle (so I need to work on it myself)! Bad habits start very easily and are much harder to correct than to prevent. He may need to be reminded of his manners, and not be allowed to just march on. He might have gotten used to going from the field right into his stall without interruption. Anyone who fiddles with him or has a little trouble from the start (attaching shank to halter, getting through the gate, etc) might be getting him impatient so that he's acting out. Then it all feeds on itself in a vicious cycle.

    Another thing to try (though inconvenient), is to hold off from feeding him immediately when he goes in his stall. Maybe even take him back out once or twice, then leave him while you attend to other things for a few moments. He's in a hurry to come in and then gets rewarded immediately without having to do anything for it. If he misbehaves with someone bringing him in and THEN gets his dinner right away then he has no reason to stop his bad behavior.
    I hope naughty River starts minding his manners. He MUST realize how lucky he is!?!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb. 7, 2005
    Location
    Lancaster, PA
    Posts
    5,028

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by amastrike View Post
    It's just weird because he was there for a good 3 months before he started being bad.
    Were there any staff changes during that time? Different handler?



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2012
    Posts
    667

    Default

    I think the part where you said you don't have a problem with bringing him in but other people do ,would make me observe what they are doing with your horse.
    I would start there first. If they are now somewhat intimidated, he maybe picking up on that and basically having his way.
    For my young horses that act stupid when hand walking them, I use a water filled squirt bottle and zap them in the face if they even 'think' about rearing or being sassy. It keeps them on the ground and respectful without having to do anything fancy. Once they learn what the squirt bottle means, I usually just have to show it to them or shake it.
    Good luck.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2009
    Location
    Southern Colorado
    Posts
    293

    Default

    I'm just going to toss this out there, take it or leave it. Tb's fret when they have time off. Could he be working himself into an ulcer? I have my Tb on smartpaks probiotics just to be sure he stays level with his digestion. Just an idea.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
    Posts
    13,236

    Default

    Take him off the Smartcalm ultra to start with. I had a horse who I tried a supplement that was supposed to calm them, and Jet went nuts on it. Many people have reported the same problme with MSM/magnesium.

    I'd also cut back the grain if he isn't being worked hard. Maybe substitute some grass hay for the alfalfa.

    Then, work him if possible 3 or 4 days a week. TB's are pretty smart. If he is bored, with excess energy, he may be looking for ways to amuse himself. Jet will do that with other people in the barn by making a game out of being caught, so they chase him around. Yet, he has never done that with me. And I've owned him 13 yrs.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2010
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    4,011

    Default

    What if they bring him in first of all the horses that come in?

    Maybe he just gets SOOO excited about coming in now that he knows the routine, and just can't control himself. By the time you get out there, his adrenaline rush is over and done with and he is back to being a good citizen.
    Freeing worms from cans everywhere!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2006
    Posts
    3,570

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FindersKeepers View Post
    I second all of what HungarianHippo said, but in addition, if he's being bad with a chain all of a sudden, someone used it improperly and hurt him and he's being defensive. If he's fine for you and bad for some of the employees, it's likely the people and the way they are handling.

    He's out of work, his grain doubled, and he's getting lots of alfalfa. He's got loads of energy in his system and any added stress will cause an explosion. I'd cut the grain back, and add some rice bran if you're having weight issues, which I'm assuming is why his grain doubled suddenly. That's a lot of grain for any horse, let alone a TB out of work.
    THIS!!! Too much gas in the tank!!!
    www.crosscreeksporthorses.com
    Breeders of Painted Thoroughbreds and Uniquely Painted Irish Sport Horses in Northeast Oklahoma



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2012
    Location
    Fern Creek, KY
    Posts
    3,010

    Default

    *sings* It's the most wonderful time of the year!!!

    Seriously though, it is about that time of year when everybody starts to get a little antsy. I'm with the above posters who say that it was probably a handler error. Striking can be a defensive thing, so to me that means he was being silly and somebody got in his face the wrong way about it. Now he's in defense mode.

    Ask who was handling him the first time he did it and who he's done it with since. You might have your answer there. It can't hurt to make some feed changes too and let him loose in the arena to shake the crazies out. A tired horse is a happy horse!
    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
    I prefer them outside playing as opposed to standing in the barn aisle playing "I can crap more than you"
    New Year, New Blog... follow Willow and I here.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2011
    Posts
    1,188

    Default

    Just throwing this out there..is his feed waiting for him in his stall when he is brought in? Is he fed right away?



Similar Threads

  1. I'm a new OTTB Mom!
    By Vermilion in forum Eventing
    Replies: 35
    Last Post: Nov. 5, 2013, 12:45 PM
  2. My New OTTB needs a Name!!
    By besttwtbever in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: Aug. 15, 2011, 12:21 AM
  3. For all your OTTB needs
    By vbunny in forum Eventing
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Sep. 11, 2009, 09:57 PM
  4. bit for ottb?
    By chelsealaurenmurphy in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: Aug. 31, 2009, 02:02 PM
  5. Replies: 8
    Last Post: Jul. 15, 2009, 11:52 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness