The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2005
    Location
    The Prairie
    Posts
    5,373

    Default I'm gonna do it. Laser eye surgery.

    I have had it had it had it had it with glasses and contact lenses. I am 47 yrs old, worn corrective lenses since I was 11 and I have had it.

    I have booked surgery for April 25. I have been assessed by the technician, still need to have the consultation with the surgeon and decide ILasik or PRK.

    I have many questions for him but thought I would canvas the horsey set.

    1) No dusty dirty or smoky environments for 2 weeks. I have a barn. Is it reasonable to get someone to do chores for me for a week then wear goggles?

    2) Technician said most athletes involved in contact sports get PRK vs ILasik as it results in a stronger cornea. I don't consider riding a contact sport but I have gotten clocked in the head from time to time. I also work with young horses. Did you go with ILasik or PRK?

    3) I am getting to the point of needing reading glasses. At this point I can read a computer screen and most printed words just fine. However, I am peering over the top of my glasses for fine print. This is impossible with contacts and my arms aren't long enough. Technician says it is possible to correct dominant eye to see far and other eye to see near. Does this not affect one's depth perception? And does that not affect your ability to judge a take off spot for jumping?

    4) Night vision. I am aware that poor corneal healing can affect your night vision. Mine is not super wonderful as it is. I prefer glasses to contacts for night driving. I experience some glare and starburst patterns from lights at night. Technican says surgeon can actually improve night vision. Anyone have that experience?

    These are, of course, questions for the surgeon but I am curious what experience horse people have had. I am particuarly curious about the depth perception thing if I go with a different correction in each eye. If I have them both corrected to the same degree I can't just peer over my glasses like I do now.


    P.S. don't tell my 81 yr mother I am doing this. She would kill me.
    I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 18, 2011
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    211

    Default

    Good for you! I got Lasik ~10 years ago and have been so happy with it

    Re: barn work, I had someone cover my chores for the afternoon after the surgery and the following day, then wore goggles for the two weeks while doing stalls, riding, etc. Didn't have any problems, though your mileage may vary. (I was 30-ish when I got mine done).

    I had both eyes corrected for nearsightedness, and have only just started thinking I could use reading glasses.

    Re: night vision, mine was *bad* for about the first year after the surgery (starbursts, glare, etc.), then cleared up. Now it's quite good.

    The only thing I really lost from the surgery was a bit of peripheral vision--it's still tough to shave my armpits (potentially TMI, snicker). But it was totally worth it to not fight with glasses or contacts!

    Best of luck to you!
    Horsey romances written by a horsey person
    www.JesseHayworth.com



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2008
    Posts
    323

    Default

    My old trainer had it done about 10 or more years ago. She loved it. She did still have to use reading glasses.

    1) She wore goggles and did fine.

    I really don't know the answer to the others.. I will say she is now almost blind in one eye - she told me it was because of the retina detaching. I don't think it is related to eye surgery though.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 15, 2001
    Posts
    4,674

    Default

    Hubby had PRK done courtesy of the army 4 years ago... apparently they don't actually do lasik, just PRK. His vision was corrected to ~20/15 in both eyes. He is thrilled with the results.

    PRK is more painful and has a longer healing time than lasik due to the complete removal of the flap, but apparently less of a chance of infection and better long-term healing and sight correction. He was stuck in the house wearing dark glasses for about 4 days, and on percocet (definitely needed) for most of that time. Had some night vision issues for about 4 months, but not enough to keep him from driving/working/training at night.

    Hubby is so happy with it he wishes he had done it 10 years earlier.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2005
    Location
    Spotsylvania, VA
    Posts
    12,256

    Default

    I had mine done a year and a half ago. I'm 63.
    The surgeon recommended correcting both eyes for distance. He was afraid that I would have trouble with depth perception otherwise. I now need reading glasses, but had bifocals before the surgery.
    He had me stay out of the barn for 2 weeks or so due to fungal infections. Fungal infections did not sound appealing so I complied.
    Evidently they can predict who will have problems at night depending on the size of the pupil and amount of correction needed. I have had no problems
    Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2005
    Location
    The Prairie
    Posts
    5,373

    Default

    According to surgeon PRK is approved by NASA, army, etc and he recommends it for basketball players, hockey player, police officers, prison guards etc because the risk getting a stick or elbow in the eye. With ILasik there is chance a direct blow to the eyeball will dislodge the flap. Professionally I am safe, my biggest occupational hazard is eye strain or a paper cut. Horse wise, though, might it be a good idea? If I get konked in the head (something I try really hard to avoid ) it is more of a blunt blow to the side of the head as opposed to a blow right to the eye.

    Technician says surgeon is very conservative and if he thinks PRK is better he will recommend it. I do have a scar one one cornea and it is possible that will push me in direction of PRK.

    I am pretty busy with work, family, horses etc so if he thinks I am good candidate for ILasik I might go that route because of shorter down time.
    I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2005
    Location
    The Prairie
    Posts
    5,373

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by carolprudm View Post
    The surgeon recommended correcting both eyes for distance. He was afraid that I would have trouble with depth perception otherwise.
    Thank you, I was really wondering about that. I don't need any more reasons to screw up my distances!
    I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2005
    Location
    Spotsylvania, VA
    Posts
    12,256

    Default

    My son had to have PRK based on the thickness of his cornea. He doesn't regret not needing glasses but he has had a lot more problems than I had with the iLasik. He still uses a lot of eye drops
    Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 16, 2002
    Location
    ontario, canada
    Posts
    2,381

    Default


    1) No dusty dirty or smoky environments for 2 weeks. I have a barn. Is it reasonable to get someone to do chores for me for a week then wear goggles?
    I think that is pretty reasonable. I recall going to a horse show on day 2 to watch some friends, and I just wore sunglasses. I also definitely didn't wear goggles when I rode, just sunglasses.

    2) Technician said most athletes involved in contact sports get PRK vs ILasik as it results in a stronger cornea. I don't consider riding a contact sport but I have gotten clocked in the head from time to time. I also work with young horses. Did you go with ILasik or PRK?
    I had the Interlase SBK, which combines the safety of PRK with the quick recovery time of LASIK surgery. I know that the clinic I went to would not advise Lasik or professional athletes like hockey players due to the issues of getting clocked in the head and having the 'flap' move etc. With the Interlase procedure, they basically do something to the flap that causes it to act as a suction cup and the risk of the flap shifting is lower. They will now do this surgery for professional hockey players, and I figured they were at a higher risk of hard hits than I!

    Both my parents had PRK and one had a great result, while the other had issues (eye regressed, basically fought the correction - TWICE). The recovery period was not fun, especially when compared to my incredibly easy recovery!

    3) I am getting to the point of needing reading glasses. At this point I can read a computer screen and most printed words just fine. However, I am peering over the top of my glasses for fine print. This is impossible with contacts and my arms aren't long enough. Technician says it is possible to correct dominant eye to see far and other eye to see near. Does this not affect one's depth perception? And does that not affect your ability to judge a take off spot for jumping?
    I didn't have this surgery but an acquaintance did. She is active and into skiing and ski racing. I know that she hasn't had any issues.

    4) Night vision. I am aware that poor corneal healing can affect your night vision. Mine is not super wonderful as it is. I prefer glasses to contacts for night driving. I experience some glare and starburst patterns from lights at night. Technican says surgeon can actually improve night vision. Anyone have that experience?
    I have HUGE pupils, and had ghosting at night with contacts. It never bothered me much. I was warned that I would have the same issues after the surgery due to my abnormal pupils, and I do. It isn't hugely noticeable or a big deal in my daily life. When they map your eyes, and they will be able to tell you if you are likely to have the same issue.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    38,538

    Default

    I rather keep my glasses, thank you, but many people I know have had all different kinds of such surgeries.
    Every one of them wishes they had it done sooner, they are so happy with the results.
    No one reported being hard or painful or having any problems, said problems were rare, it is very much standard any more.

    Hope this helped.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 14, 2005
    Location
    Aiken SC / Fay NC
    Posts
    5,366

    Default

    SO had lasik in one eye, PRK in the other.

    Key points:

    Vitamin C supplementation during the few weeks after recovery (something about vasoconstriction properties - Doctor actually prescribed it).

    Stay on top of your pain meds. Don't wait for it to start hurting to remember to do your drops.

    ABSOLUTELY stay on top of the antibiotic / antifungal drops.
    FREE TACK/APPAREL ADS: BITS AND BARTER BOARD: http://bitsandbarter.proboards.com/i...ay&thread=5450



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 24, 2007
    Location
    Monroe, WA USA
    Posts
    229

    Default

    I had Lasik over 15 years ago so I'm not quite up on the newest procedures. Anyway, I did one eye at 20/15 and the other at 20/30 so I wouldn't need reading or computer glasses for a while. It worked out well for me and I didn't have any depth perception problems, YMMV. I started needing reading glasses about 5 years ago, and this year now need computer glasses. I was just careful about dust, etc. for the first week.

    I know some people who had PRK and they took a long time to heal. With Lasik your vision correction is pretty much immediate whereas with PRK it takes quite a while before you can see well. Guess your cornea has to grow back before you notice the correction.

    I had a little problem with glaring from lights at night and now have glasses to help minimize it. Fortunately I don't have to wear the glasses very often and only when driving.

    My eyes were really dry after the procedure and I should have used the eye drops more often. They said every half hour, but I really needed them about every 10-15 minutes, but that was only for a few days.



Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 13
    Last Post: Jun. 24, 2013, 03:36 PM
  2. Laser surgery for horse that roars...
    By southern in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Feb. 16, 2012, 03:12 PM
  3. yup.. I'm gonna say it!
    By themarchcat in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: Nov. 28, 2011, 11:27 AM
  4. Replies: 8
    Last Post: Nov. 24, 2011, 06:10 PM
  5. Tie back surgery vs. Laser Surgery
    By GiGi Larkin in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: Jan. 11, 2011, 08:06 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness