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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 22, 2004
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    Central Florida
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    Default Question on sale ads....

    More often now I see the term "only to good home" and "good home a must". Why is this posted all the time? It isn't like someone is going to call and admit to having a horrible hording home. Isn't an unspoken term that when you buy a horse from someone that you plan to give it a good home?
    *^*^*^
    Himmlische Traumpferde
    "Wenn Du denkst es geht nicht mehr, kommt von irgendwo ein kleines Licht daher"



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Default

    Best to avoid those.
    Either a crook trying to dump a horse that has problems and wants you to feel like you are helping and not see the problems, or a teenager with strange ideas of what a good home is.

    I bought a horse out of one such ad, the older horse had terrible feet and teeth that had not been done forever, but they didn't want it to go to any other than to a good home.



  3. #3

    Default

    It's one way for an individual seller to set themselves apart from the dealers/sale barns. Or for dealers/sale barns to give the individual/caring owner vibe.

    It may also suggest the seller is going to be picky about who they sell to. People have different ideas of what a "good home" means, so this could be as innocuous as meaning they will check references and as controlling as insisting they will only sell the horse to someone who plans to keep it in X situation, riding in Y discipline, and providing Z standard of care, etc.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2010
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    Orygun
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    Default

    Not that I'm in the market but I do read the for sale ads. From what I've noticed, the 'good home' ones are so picky about the horse, I'd avoid them anyway. Someone once told me they put that in their ads to weed out the undesirable homes, not that a home couldn't go bad in the future, but for right now anyway. I still don't see how anyone can predict what tomorrow may bring and guarantee a good home forever and ever.
    GR24's Musing #19 - Save the tatas!!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    15,556

    Default

    It used to mean that the would-be buyer who could offer the seller's idea of a good home has some room to negotiate for a lower price.

    So code for "Yeah, I'm flexible... but not on the traditional grounds of haggling for a used car."
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


    3 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2010
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    Orygun
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    It used to mean that the would-be buyer who could offer the seller's idea of a good home has some room to negotiate for a lower price.

    So code for "Yeah, I'm flexible... but not on the traditional grounds of haggling for a used car."
    That's a good code and I think you're right. However, on some of my FB horse pages, there are horses who people have tried to buy but the seller seems to be deadly serious about who, what, when, where and why the horse can be used. I don't know how they can do that, but they do.
    GR24's Musing #19 - Save the tatas!!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2009
    Location
    Pennsylvania
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    Default

    I've found it means MANY different things. Some people just tack it on in an ad without really even thinking about it. I've put it in an ad, meaning that I will be reserving the right to check out who I'm selling the horse to. For those of you who say "avoid those sellers", well maybe you do avoid some crazies that way but you will miss out on some really nice horses too.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2012
    Posts
    641

    Default

    I've used it in meaning the price is negotiable to a good home type situation. That if the "perfect" new home came along and the horse was out of their price range that we would be willing to work with the person. Or just expressing why a horse is priced a certain way. These are personal horses so in my mind it helps to set us apart from dealers who are generally a bit more money motivated.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2004
    Location
    Pottstown, PA (East Coventry)
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    3,228

    Default

    I think many people mean they don't want a dealer to buy the horse and flip it the next week- such as Strain Family or they want the horse to go to a private home not a hack barn, lesson factory.
    Oh, well, clearly you're not thoroughly indoctrinated to COTH yet, because finger pointing and drawing conclusions are the cornerstones of this great online community. (Tidy Rabbit)


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by SonnysMom View Post
    I think many people mean they don't want a dealer to buy the horse and flip it the next week- such as Strain Family or they want the horse to go to a private home not a hack barn, lesson factory.
    They should say so then.

    Some ads say just that.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 22, 2004
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    Central Florida
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SonnysMom View Post
    I think many people mean they don't want a dealer to buy the horse and flip it the next week- such as Strain Family or they want the horse to go to a private home not a hack barn, lesson factory.
    I agree with you Bluey. I actually went to look at a horse sold in the VA auction from the Strain farm. New buyer had many large offers from a large lesson program down the street for this horse. I came along and got him for a great price because I was considered the "good home" (12yr old at the time and he and I clicked even though he wasnt an easy ride) . I went and tried him out though.

    Many horses are bought site unseen over the internet these days and how on earth could you decide what a good home is on any horse let alone a $500 one. I see where it can weed out the dealers but the ripeoffs could talk a good talk I do understand the comment "price nego to right home" or something to that extent
    *^*^*^
    Himmlische Traumpferde
    "Wenn Du denkst es geht nicht mehr, kommt von irgendwo ein kleines Licht daher"



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2006
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    3,571

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    They should say so then.

    Some ads say just that.
    ***********

    This is the polite way of saying it!! I use this statement sometimes. I will not sell one of my good old boy packers to a lesson barn or one of my more sensitive horses to a "backyard, questionable care" situations.
    www.crosscreeksporthorses.com
    Breeders of Painted Thoroughbreds and Uniquely Painted Irish Sport Horses in Northeast Oklahoma



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