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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2010
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    72

    Default Turn out on winter pasture question

    I had a good piece of my pasture fenced off since last summer. I've taken down the temporary fence today. My senior guy was recently diagnosed with ulcers. I am thinking it would be good for him to graze more. My mare is an easy keeper. Should I be concerned about leaving them out on this area 24/7, like on spring grass?

    Thank you!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2012
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    488

    Default

    If they're not accustomed to eating on this grass...you should do what is recommended for ALL feed changes, and introduce them S-L-O-W-L-Y...



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2010
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    72

    Default

    I started getting a little worried as soon as I pulled it down!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 11, 2011
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
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    269

    Default

    How much extra area is it? Are we talking 10 acres of lush pasture or like 2 acres of winter grass not eaten all the way down?
    "No hour of life is wasted that is spent in the saddle" - Winston Churchill

    Check out Central Virginia Horse Rescue



  5. #5
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    Jul. 5, 2010
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    72

    Default

    About 3/4 - 1 acre winter grass. I rested this part of the pasture starting in May (?) of last year. I mowed it at least four times last summer. There are a lot of plantains and clover, and mixed grass. They were out for 45 mins today and I put the fence back up.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
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    10,577

    Default

    Since they have, I'm guessing, been out of grass where they are for awhile. I would start them back slowly, as you have been. Besides I think they could quickly strip that if left for longer periods of time.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2010
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    72

    Default

    Merrygoround, with all the rain we've been having lately, it could get pretty trampled in short order. They were so happy yesterday to play on the grass--Miss Mare did a little buck-toot



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2009
    Posts
    8,743

    Default Please be careful ~

    Just saying although winter ``` I still have to watch mine after rain or snow !

    Too many delicious sprouts !
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2010
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    2,236

    Default

    Reintroduce slowly. If your winter grass is not completely dormant it could be very high in sugar.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2010
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    72

    Default

    Ok, another question, the area they are in now has grass but it's been eaten to the ground. Is it worse to leave them where they are now? I'm worried about Ulcer Gelding getting too much sugar as I think this would be considered as stressed grass? It's been 50 degree today where I am in the Midwest .

    I never realized how much of a challenge it would be keeping horses at home!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2011
    Posts
    535

    Default

    I would say the grass is stressed in both situations and if it's eaten to the ground it will be hard to get enough to upset much, so that's definitely the safer choice. I would treat the other area as spring grass. Introduce very slowly and realize ts going to be 'spring-like' sugar content until summer, so don't go crazy with it.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2010
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    72

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    Thank you! I have been reading about winter grass and that it can come out of dormancy if the weather turns warmer, and the sugar content rises throughout the day. My friend and I are going to board this summer so that can give me time to find help with my pasture. (County Extension office is wonderful for those who grow flowers and veggies but not so much when it comes to pasture management.)



  13. #13
    Join Date
    May. 20, 2009
    Posts
    495

    Default

    County extension is useless, complete embarrassment, but I know there are good ones.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2009
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    870

    Default

    I'm not sure where you guys are located but contacting a land grant university in your area is a good place to start if your county's extension office isn't of any help with pasture management, etc. So schools like Purdue, Kentucky State University, Iowa State University, U of MN, U of KY...here's the complete list.
    Quote Originally Posted by RugBug View Post
    Don't throw away opportunities because they aren't coming in exactly the form you want them to.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep. 25, 2012
    Location
    Blythewood, South Carolina
    Posts
    98

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by katiehorse View Post
    I'm worried about Ulcer Gelding getting too much sugar as I think this would be considered as stressed grass?
    Seeing as in their natural habitat in the wild, horses are supposed to be grazing 18 hours, it shouldn't do much harm. I'd say that he'd be fine on the grass he's on now, and like the mare, you should slowly introduce it.

    I've always heard eating is ALWAYS good for ulcer prone horses. It keeps their stomach full. (When the stomach isn't full, this is when the acidity level rises and starts to reach around the walls of the stomach, thus causing the ulcers to become more and more prominent.) having something in his belly can never hurt.
    Save The Date 08-15-2011



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2011
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    535

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by savethedate View Post
    Seeing as in their natural habitat in the wild, horses are supposed to be grazing 18 hours, it shouldn't do much harm. I'd say that he'd be fine on the grass he's on now, and like the mare, you should slowly introduce it.

    I've always heard eating is ALWAYS good for ulcer prone horses. It keeps their stomach full. (When the stomach isn't full, this is when the acidity level rises and starts to reach around the walls of the stomach, thus causing the ulcers to become more and more prominent.) having something in his belly can never hurt.
    What? What?!?! Ok, have to stop you there....we're not comparing apples to apples when we compare horses in their natural habitat to the planted, fertile, protected pastures we offer them now. Would you not trim your horse's feet, ever, because in the wild they trim their own? No, of course not, because our environment is NOTHING like the wild.

    Maybe in this situation, this horse is fine with that much pasture....but I caution you against applying that rule too generally, because a lot of them will become obese, leading to metabolic disorders, leading to founder, etc. Not a good rule of thumb there.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2010
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    72

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    I fed both horses 3 times a day before this latest incident. Now I've got some small hole nibble nets on order. DFL thank you! I will check that out!

    I think I'll play it safe and keep them both of the fenced off part of the pasture for now. Last thing he needs is more sugar!

    I posted pictures of my pasture last year--it's a lot of plantains, clover and grass. It needs weed control and fertilizer, and it needs to be over seeded. I probably need to just have it tilled up and start over.
    Last edited by katiehorse; Feb. 11, 2013 at 03:28 PM. Reason: To add info



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2009
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    8,743

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    Be safe with late winter and early spring grass ~

    well with any time grass ``` can be deceiving ~


    Jingles they can enjoy the pasture in short time periods ~
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov. 7, 2006
    Location
    Lexington, VA
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    1,370

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    Please be careful, as Zu Zu says. My Arabian, Willie, foundered on December grass in 2011 right before Christmas and his feet are just getting back to normal now. Better safe than sorry.
    stained glass groupie
    www.equiglas.com



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2010
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    Thank you Zu Zu and Event Groupie! I would have never have thought winter grass could be dangerous-- just kinda got that funny feeling when I took the fence down.



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